23 posts categorized "Actors"

May 15, 2018

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY — TRAILER

Scheduled for release on November 2, Bohemian Rhapsody already looks like a shoe-in come Oscar-nomination season. 

The movie stars Rami Malek in the title role as Freddie Mercury. Lucy Boynton, Gwilym Lee, Ben Hardy, Joseph Mazzello, Aiden Gillen, Tom Hollander, and Mike Myers also star. In spite of all of the musical chairs regarding directors and actors, this looks to be a very entertaining experience. 

April 30, 2018

Metal Monday II — MONSTER CYCLE

If you liked the first episode of Adam Zuniga's METAL MONDAY, you'll love the follow-up. Bang your head!

March 28, 2018

APRIL PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
APRIL PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Nicholas Ray's In A Lonely Place
Adventures in Moviegoing with Adam Gopnik, and five color films by Ozu!
 
Sunday, April 1
Adventures in Moviegoing with Megan AbbottIn a Lonely Place*

Cinema has been an important part of Megan Abbott's life since her days growing up in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, when her family would make trips to the local revival house. In her episode of Adventures in Moviegoing, the award-winning novelist spoke with programmer Michael Sragow about films she loves, including ones that have influenced her approach to crime fiction. This month, we're adding one of her all-time favorites to her personally curated series: Nicholas Ray's emotionally charged adaptation of the Dorothy B. Hughes thriller In a Lonely Place. A brilliant, turbulent mix of suspenseful noir and devastating melodrama, fueled by powerhouse performances from Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame, the film follows a gifted but washed-up screenwriter who becomes the prime suspect in a Tinseltown murder. Watch it on the Channel with a new introduction by Abbott.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, April 3
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Monkey Love Experiments* and Koko: A Talking Gorilla

Two different takes on the complex relationship between humans and primates. Combining stop-motion animation, live-action, and CG, Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson's BAFTA-nominated 2014 short Monkey Love Experiments tells the story of a misguided monkey who believes he's destined for the moon. In Koko: A Talking Gorilla, acclaimed director Barbet Schroeder and cinematographer Nestor Almendros create an intimate documentary portrait of the world-famous title subject, exploring the ethical concerns surrounding a controversial experiment that sought to teach her human communication through American Sign Language.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, April 4
Metropolitan*: Edition #326
 
One of the great American independent films of the 1990s, the surprise hit Metropolitan, by writer-director Whit Stillman, is a sparkling comedic chronicle of a young man's romantic misadventures while trying to fit in to New York City's debutante society. Stillman's deft, literate dialogue and hilariously highbrow observations earned this first film an Academy Award nomination for best original screenplay. Beneath the wit and sophistication, though, lies a tender tale of adolescent anxiety. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Stillman, editor Christopher Tellefsen, and actors Chris Eigeman and Taylor Nichols; and rare outtakes and alternate casting, with commentary by Stillman.
 
Thursday, April 5
Art-House America: Gold Town Nickelodeon, Juneau, Alaska
Local Hero, Bill Forsyth, 1983
 
Last year, the Channel-exclusive series Art-House America took a trip to Juneau, Alaska, where intrepid programmer Colette Costa runs a downtown movie theater catering to year-round locals in the country's cruise-ship capital. Alongside our documentary portrait of this bustling venue, Costa has been programming an ongoing selection of films that capture "what it feels like to live in Alaska." The latest addition to the series is Bill Forsyth's 1983 Local Hero, presented in a limited engagement. Mixing wry comedy and unexpected pathos, and featuring music by Mark Knopfler, this stirring ode to Forsyth's native Scotland follows a Texas oil executive (Peter Riegert) whose life is changed when his boss (Burt Lancaster) sends him to a Scottish village to buy up land for a new refinery.
Friday, April 6
Friday Night Double Feature: Night Moves and My Night at Maud's
 
"I saw a Rohmer film once. It was kinda like watching paint dry." So says Gene Hackman, famously, in Arthur Penn's 1975 neo-noir Night Moves, a film that contains striking parallels and references to the French director's wonderfully talky 1969 My Night at Maud's. Penn's New Hollywood masterpiece centers on Harry Moseby (Hackman), a retired professional football player turned Los Angeles private investigator who finds himself embroiled in the complex case of a runaway teen. One of the most acclaimed entries in the influential series "Six Moral Tales," Rohmer's film features Jean-Louis Trintignant as a pious Catholic engineer whose rigid ethical standards are challenged when he unwittingly spends the night at the apartment of a bold, brunette divorcée.
 
Monday, April 9
Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins: The Summer of Flying Fish*
 
Not long after winning an Oscar last year for Moonlight, Barry Jenkins joined Criterion's Peter Becker for an intimate conversation about his personal journey as a movie lover, the filmmakers who have influenced his style, and finding his relationship to cinema as a person of color. Alongside some of his favorite classics, he championed some little-seen gems, including Chilean director Marcela Said's 2013 narrative feature debut, The Summer of Flying Fish. A vivid coming-of-age story and a powerful allegory about environmental destruction, this richly atmospheric drama follows a teenage girl as she goes on vacation with her father, a wealthy landowner who becomes obsessed with eliminating the carp fish from his artificial lagoon. Featuring a new introduction from Jenkins, the film streams on the Channel in a limited engagement.
*Premiering on the Criterion Channel this month.
Tuesday, April 10
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Manhatta and The Naked City
The New York of the past comes to life in these two portraits, shot in different periods in the city's history. A pioneering work of American avant-garde cinema, the silent short Manhatta (1921)- directed by photographer Paul Strand and painter Charles Sheeler-takes in the modern metropolis from a variety of soaring perspectives, assembling a miniature symphony of the city in all its industrial splendor. Shot on location more than a quarter of a century later, Jules Dassin's masterpiece The Naked City (1948), a noir procedural inspired by Italian neorealism, offers a grittier view of Lower Manhattan from street level.
 
Wednesday, April 11
The 400 Blows: Edition #5
 
François Truffaut's first feature is also his most personal. Told from the point of view of Truffaut's cinematic counterpart, Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud), The 400 Blows sensitively re-creates the trials of Truffaut's own childhood, unsentimentally portraying aloof parents, oppressive teachers, and petty crime. The film marked Truffaut's passage from leading critic to trailblazing auteur of the French New Wave. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: two audio commentaries, one by cinema professor Brian Stonehill and the other by director François Truffaut's lifelong friend Robert Lachenay; rare audition footage of Jean-Pierre Léaud, Patrick Auffay, and Richard Kanayan; newsreel footage from the film's showing at Cannes; and more.
 
Friday, April 13
Friday Night Double Feature: M and Peeping Tom
 
These unsettling and widely influential thrillers give viewers a glimpse inside the psychopathic mind. Fritz Lang's expressionist touchstone M (1931) revolves around the Berlin manhunt for a murderer of children (Peter Lorre), in the process offering an analysis of the man's tortured psyche. In Peeping Tom (1960), a controversial film that nearly ended his career but is now regarded as a masterpiece, Michael Powell offers a Freudian portrait of a London serial killer (Carl Boehm), a cameraman with a predilection for recording the terror of his victims.

Monday, April 16
In Search of Ozu
 
In this original documentary, filmmaker Daniel Raim delves into Yasujiro Ozu's remarkable late work, in which the master made the leap from black and white to color. In his stirring tribute to the great filmmaker, Raim examines Ozu's life and work through archival treasures such as his diary and the red teakettle from the family drama Equinox Flower (1958); sits down with Ozu's nephew and the producer of the director's gently elegiac final film, An Autumn Afternoon (1962); and interweaves many scenes and images from the vibrant and humane films with which the director capped his career. Alongside the documentary, we present five of Ozu's color films, including Equinox Flower, Floating Weeds (1959), Late Autumn (1960), The End of Summer (1961), and An Autumn Afternoon (1962). 
 
Tuesday, April 17
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Casus belli* and Weekend
 
Two critiques of consumerism that make dazzling use of tracking shots. In Greek filmmaker Yorgos Zois's sinuous debut short, Casus belli (2010), an apparently continuous dolly shot observes different queues of people, from the supermarket checkout line to the wait at the betting-agency counter-and back again-wryly revealing the social divisions among those standing in place. Jean-Luc Godard's acid comedy Weekend (1967), in which a bourgeois couple set out to secure an inheritance from a dying relative, opens with a famous seven-minute-long shot of a massive traffic pileup, setting the tone for the entropic satire to follow.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, April 18
The Hero: Edition #911
 
In this psychologically rich character study, written and directed by Satyajit Ray, Bengali film star Uttam Kumar draws on his real-world celebrity to play Arindam Mukherjee, a matinee idol on the brink of his first flop. When Mukherjee boards an overnight train to Delhi to accept an award, a journalist (Sharmila Tagore) approaches him seeking an exclusive interview, which initiates a conversation that sends the actor reeling down a path of self-examination. Seamlessly integrating rueful flashbacks and surreal dream sequences with the quietly revelatory stories of the train's other passengers, The Hero is a graceful meditation on art, fame, and regret from one of world cinema's most keenly perceptive filmmakers. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a program featuring an interview from 2008 with actor Sharmila Tagore, and a program featuring film scholar Meheli Sen.
 
Friday, April 20
Friday Night Double Feature: Babette's Feast and The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover

Food represents the highest of arts and the basest of cruelties in this cinematic banquet. Gabriel Axel's Oscar-winning Babette's Feast, adapted from a short story by Isak Dinesen, tells the moving story of a French housekeeper with a mysterious past who brings quiet revolution in the form of one exquisite meal to a circle of starkly pious villagers in late-nineteenth-century Denmark. It's paired with an outrageously decadent masterpiece from Peter Greenaway, who stages a modern Jacobean revenge tragedy in a lavish restaurant, where a brutal gangster (Michael Gambon) holds court while his wife (Helen Mirren) sneaks away to her paramour. With vivid cinematography by Sacha Vierny and a hypnotic Michael Nyman score, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover culminates in a memorably gruesome feast.
 
Monday, April 23
Observations on Film Art No. 18: Staging and Performance in Ivan the Terrible, Part II

Sergei Eisenstein's final film, a two-part biopic of the notorious Tsar Ivan IV, is one of the revolutionary director's boldest experiments in film form, frequently departing from the codes of cinematic realism. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at how great filmmakers use cinematic devices and techniques, scholar David Bordwell examines Eisenstein's concept of "expressive movement," and shows how the director uses it to stage elaborate set pieces that incorporate the languages of painting and dance.
 
Tuesday, April 24
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Ghost Trip and Kings of the Road

These spare, existential road movies take in vast landscapes in stunning black and white. Bill Morrison's eerie Ghost Trip, a rare "fiction" film from an artist best known for his use of archival material, follows a mysterious driver on an American odyssey from coast to coast, passing through deserts, casinos, and graveyards along the way. Then, the capstone of Wim Wenders's Road Trilogy accompanies a film projector repairman and a depressed psychologist as they roam aimlessly from one movie theater to another across a melancholy Germany still haunted by war.
 
Wednesday, April 25
An Actor's Revenge: Edition #912

A uniquely prolific and chameleonic figure of world cinema, Kon Ichikawa delivered a burst of stylistic bravado with this intricate tale of betrayal and retribution. Set in the cloistered world of nineteenth-century kabuki theater, the film charts a female impersonator's attempts to avenge the deaths of his parents, who were driven to insanity and suicide by a trio of corrupt men. Ichikawa takes the conventions of melodrama and turns them on their head, bringing the hero's fractured psyche to life in boldly experimental widescreen compositions infused with kaleidoscopic color, pop-art influences, and meticulous choreography. Anchored by a magnificently androgynous performance by Kazuo Hasegawa, reprising a role he had played on-screen three decades earlier, An Actor's Revenge is an eye-popping examination of how the illusions of art intersect with life. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: A rare 1999 Directors Guild of Japan interview with director Kon Ichikawa, conducted by film critic Yuki Mori; and an interview with critic, filmmaker, and festival programmer Tony Rayns.
 
Thursday, April 26
Adventures in Moviegoing with Adam Gopnik

This month's guest curator, author and longtime New Yorker contributor Adam Gopnik, is a writer of omnivorous interests. For his selection of favorite films, he handpicked gems such as Jacques Demy's The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and Jean Cocteau's Orpheus, and then sat down with Antonio Monda, artistic director of the Rome Film Festival, to discuss a lifetime of moviegoing. From watching European cinema on television with his family, to seeing Singin' in the Rain during his adolescence in Paris, to his first date with the woman he would go on to marry (they saw Jean Vigo's achingly romantic L'Atalante), Gopnik chronicles his infatuation with cinema, a medium whose storytelling methods he often seeks to emulate in his own writing.
 
Friday, April 27
Friday Night Double Feature: Tokyo Drifter and The Long Good Friday

This gangster-movie double bill finds two career criminals attempting to go straight, only to get sucked back into the underworld. In Tokyo Drifter (1966),Seijun Suzuki's delirious pop-art riff on the yakuza genre, reformed hit man Tetsu gets called back from retirement to do battle with a rival gang, resulting in an onslaught of giddily stylized action. Then, a magnetic Bob Hoskins stars in John Mackenzie's The Long Good Friday (1980) as a vicious London mob boss whose best-laid plans to cross over into legitimate business get blown to smithereens over the course of one agonizing, bloody day.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
April 1
In a Lonely Place, Nicholas Ray, 1950
 
April 3
Monkey Love Experiments, Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson, 2014
 
April 4
Metropolitan, Whit Stillman, 1990
 
April 9
The Summer of Flying Fish, Marcela Said, 2013
 
April 17
Casus belli, Yorgos Zois, 2010
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.

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December 04, 2017

NEW BROADCAST TIME FOR THE 90TH OSCARS®

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

 THE COUNTDOWN BEGINS: 90 DAYS TO OSCAR® SUNDAY

NEW BROADCAST TIME FOR THE 90TH OSCARS®
LIVE SUNDAY, MARCH 4, AT 8 PM EST/5 PM PST ON ABC

The Oscars Pre-Show Will Kick Off the Night’s Festivities at 6:30 p.m. EST/3:30 p.m. PST

First Look at New 90th Oscars Promo 

ABC and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today the 90th Oscars® telecast on Sunday, March 4, 2018, will now begin at 8:00 p.m. EST/5:00 p.m. PST, a half-hour earlier than prior telecasts. As previously announced, late-night talk show favorite Jimmy Kimmel will return to host, and Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd will return to produce.

Additionally, starting at 6:30 p.m. EST/3:30 p.m. PST, the Oscars Pre-Show returns to give fans exclusive, insider access to all the excitement of the red carpet. The 90-minute special features interviews with nominees, presenters and performers, and brings viewers the best behind-the-scenes moments. ABC and the Academy also released a first look at the 90th Oscars with a promo celebrating the season. To view the promo and download additional assets, click here.

The 90th Oscars will be held on Sunday, March 4, 2018, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center®in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network. The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

About the Academy
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 8,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which is under construction in Los Angeles.

About ABC Entertainment
ABC Entertainment airs compelling programming across all day parts, with new shows including fall’s No. 1 new drama, “The Good Doctor”; as well as “Kevin (Probably) Saves the World” and “The Mayor”; and current hits such as groundbreaking dramas “Designated Survivor,” “Quantico,” “Scandal” “How to Get Away with Murder,” “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and “Once Upon a Time.” The ABC Television Network is also home to the Emmy® Award-winning “Modern Family” and trailblazing comedy favorites “black-ish,” “American Housewife,” “Fresh Off the Boat,” “The Goldbergs,” “The Middle” and “Speechless”; hit game shows “$100,000 Pyramid,” “Celebrity Family Feud,” “Match Game” and “To Tell the Truth”; reality phenomenon “Shark Tank,” iconic “The Bachelor” franchise, long-running hits “Dancing with the Stars” and “America’s Funniest Home Videos,” and the return of “American Idol”; “General Hospital,” which has aired for over 50 years on the network, along with daytime talk show “The Chew”; and late-night talk show “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” The network also boasts some of television’s most prestigious awards shows, including “The Oscars®,” “The CMA Awards” and “The American Music Awards.”

November 30, 2017

Ask Jim Jarmusch a Question!

 
Ask Jim Jarmusch
 
Criterion's popular Q&A series with director Jim Jarmusch is back!
A special edition of Jarmusch's Dead Man is currently in the works,
will feature a new 4K restoration and is slated to be released in 2018.
 

The Criterion Collection is currently working on the special edition of Jarmusch's Dead Man, which will feature a new 4K restoration and is slated to be released in 2018, and is wondering if fans have any questions that they would like answered about the film.
 
Criterion will be accepting all of your questions from fans from now until December 8 and sending the most thoughtful and creative ones to Jim. Though they cannot guarantee that all will be answered on the release, feel free to ask as many as you like. Personal requests will not be answered.
 
Now ask away! Just make sure to include your full name, city, state, and country of residence with your questions.

November 29, 2017

THE FOX SEARCHLIGHT PARTY 2017

Doug Jones & Richard Jenkins

Two finer gentlemen you could never hope to meet. Richard Jenkins is a national treasure of American Cinema. Doug Jones is one of the kindest human beings I've ever met; his performance as the monster in "The Shape of Water," as contrasted with his ebullient personality, reminds me of Boris Karloff — my favorite movie monster actor of all time. 

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As for pleasant people to chat with, Guillermo del Toro is a filmmaker I'd like to write a book about. He remembered me from the time I interviewed him in Cannes for "Pan's Labyrinth." Mike spoke Spanish with him and I learned that he made "The Shape of Water" for $19.3 million. Amazing!

Jonathan Dayton  Valerie Faris & Billie Jean King

Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, the husband-and-wife directing team behind "Battle of the Sexes" chat with Billie Jean King. Just a lovely scene.  

Mike & Cole

And then there were these two reprobates drinking up everything in sight and carrying on like a couple of podcast pals living it up in NYC at the truly impressive Nomad Hotel at 28th and Broadway, where the service was truly Five Stars. Kudos to the great folks at Fox Searchlight and at the Nomad Hotel; you guys were awesome, and the food and cocktails were inspired!

 

November 11, 2017

HAPPY END — Trailer & Poster

Happy_end

You had me at Michael Haneke. And then you add Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant, and we've got a very promising movie on hand. Really looking forward to seeing the latest effort from Haneke!

 

THE POST — TRAILER & POSTER

Post

Steven Spielberg's latest movie has crowd-pleaser written all over it for the 50+ generations to which it is clearly aimed. Streep and Hanks are showing their age. It's a reminder that we won't always have these great artists around with us. So, regardless of how predictably tame the narrative about the Washington Post leaking the Pentagon Papers might seem by today's standards of Wikileaks reporting, get out and see this movie. Even if it flops at the box office, "The Post" will be a success.

October 26, 2017

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT — LARS VON TRIER

The-House-That-Jack-Built-

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