51 posts categorized "Cannes Film Festival"

April 25, 2017

THE 2017 CANNES JURY IS ANNOUNCED

CANNES70

Under the presidency of the Spanish director, screenwriter and producer Pedro Almodóvar, the Jury for the 70th Festival de Cannes will be made up of eight key figures from the 7th Art, coming from all over the world. Four women and four men will thus help Pedro Almodóvar select from among the films in Competition. The winners will be announced on Sunday 28th May at the Closing Ceremony, following which the Palme d’or will be awarded in the presence of the winning team.

THE  2017 JURY
 
Pedro ALMODÓVAR – President
(Director, Screenwriter, Producer – Spain)

Maren ADE (Director, Screenwriter, Producer - Germany)

Jessica CHASTAIN (Actress, Producer - United States)

Fan BINGBING (Actress, Producer - China)

Agnès JAOUI (Actress, Screenwriter, Director, Singer – France)

Park CHAN-WOOK (Director, Screenwriter, Producer - South Korea)

Will SMITH (Actor, Producer, Musician – United States

Paolo SORRENTINO (Director, Screenwriter - Italy)

Gabriel YARED (Composer – France)

Maren ADE, director, screenwriter, producer - Germany

Maren_ade

In 1998, Maren Ade began studying film production and direction in Munich. During her studies, she co-founded the film production company Komplizen Film. In 2004, Maren Ade first film, The Forest for the Trees, premiered in Toronto and won the Special Jury Award at the Sundance Film Festival. In 2009, her second film Everyone Else received the Silver Bear for Best Film and for Best Actress. Maren Ade third film, Toni Erdmann, debuted in Competition at the 2016 Festival de Cannes and won numerous awards like the European Film Award. As a producer, she worked on productions like Tabu by Miguel Gomes and Sleeping Sickness by Ulrich Köhler.

 

Jessica CHASTAIN, actress, producer - United States

Jessica

Two-time Academy Award nominee Jessica Chastain has emerged as one of Hollywood’s most sought after actresses of her generation. She has received numerous nominations and accolades for her work, in Kathryn Bigelow’s Zero Dark Thirty, A Most Violent Yearby J.C. Chandor, The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby by Ned Benson and Ridley Scott’s The Martian. Jessica Chastain launched a production company Freckle Films. She is currently in production for Susanna White’s period drama Woman Walks Ahead and will be seen in Xavier Dolan’s The Death and Life of John F. Donovan

 

Fan BINGBING, actress, producer - China

Fan-bingbing

Born in 1981, Fan Bingbing rose to fame in 1998 with the mega-hit TV series My Fair Princess. In 2003, she starred in Cell Phone, which became the highest-grossing Chinese film of the year. Since then, she has starred in many films, most notably Lost in Beijing (2007), Buddha Mountain (2011), and Double Xposure (2012). In 2014, she participated in the Hollywood blockbuster X-Men: Days of Future Past. In 2016, she starred in I Am not Madame Bovary and received the San Sebastian Film Festival Best Actress Award as well as the 11th Asian Film Best Actress Award. Fan is selected for the 2017 TIME 100.

 

Agnès JAOUI, actress, screenwriter, director, singer – France

Agnès JAOUI

Multi-award winning artist Agnès Jaoui joined forces with Jean-Pierre Bacri to develop a theatre and film style of which Kitchen with Apartment and Family Resemblances were first to meet with success. They worked with Alain Resnais on Smoking/No Smoking and Same Old Song. In 2000, Agnès Jaoui directed The Taste of Others which won four César. She wrote and directed Look at Me, which won Best Screenplay Award at the 2004 Festival de Cannes, followed by Let’s Talk about the Rain (2008) and Under the Rainbow(2013). She is a singer, and her Latin “Canta” album won a Victoire de la Musique award in 2007. She can be currently seen in Aurore by Blandine Lenoir.

 

Park CHAN-WOOK, director, screenwriter, producer - South Korea

Park-chan-wook

Ever since his Korean box office record breaking Joint Security Area in the year 2000, Park Chan-wook’s diverse body of work has garnered recognition both at home and abroad. These include his successes at the Festival de Cannes in 2004 with the Grand Prix for Old Boy and the Jury Prize for Thirst in 2009. In 2013, Park Chan-wook expanded his œuvre to include English language films with Stoker and also produced Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer. In 2016, Park Chan-wook returned to Cannes in Competition with The Handmaiden and won the Vulcan Prize, once again establishing him as one of the most significant talents working in cinema today.

 

Will SMITH, actor, producer, musician – United States

Will-Smith

Two-time Academy Award nominee Will Smith has a vast filmography including portrayals of true-life icons in Ali, The Pursuit of Happiness and Concussion. His headlining credits include Independence Day, I, Robot, Hitch, I Am Legend, Men in Black I, II, & III, and last summer’s Suicide Squad. The two-time Grammy Award winner began his career as a musician selling millions of records worldwide before crossing over into television with The Fresh Prince of Bel Air. Will Smith is dedicated to working toward the advancement of communities and individuals through the Will and Jada Smith Family Foundation.

 

Paolo SORRENTINO, director, screenwriter - Italy

Paolo+Sorrentino

Paolo Sorrentino, director and screenwriter, was born in Naples in 1970. Seven of his 8 films have been presented in Competition at the Festival de Cannes, where Il Divo won the Prix du Jury in 2008. In 2014, his film La Grande Bellezza (The Great Beauty) won the Oscar and Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film, as well as a BAFTA. In 2016, La Giovinezza (Youth) gained an Oscar nomination and won three European Film Awards. In 2016, he made his first TV Series: The Young Pope. He has also published a novel “Hanno tutti ragione” in 2010, and two collections of short stories: “Tony Pagoda e i suoi amici” (2012), and “Gli aspetti irrilevanti” (2016).

 

Gabriel YARED, composer - France

Gabriel-yared

After spending his childhood in Lebanon, Gabriel Yared attended the composition classes of Henri Dutilleux in Paris. He stayed in Brazil and returned to France in 1972, and quickly became an orchestrator and producer sought after by the biggest European singers of the time. Since 1980, he devoted most of his time to film composition. He has written more than a hundred scores to date, of which many have earned him prestigious international awards. He wrote his first score for Jean-Luc Godard, which was followed by successful notable collaborations with Jean-Jacques Beineix, Jean-Jacques Annaud (Cesar for The Lover), Anthony Minghella (Oscar for The English Patient) and Xavier Dolan.


Copyrights
Pedro Almodóvar © El Deseo D.A.S.L.U. Nico Bustos
Park Chan-wook © SEO Ji-hyoung
Maren Ade © Iris Janke
Agnès Jaoui © Laurent Viteur / Getty Images
Will Smith © Matt Doyle / Contour by Getty Images
Paolo Sorrentino © C. Laruffa Splash NewsCorbis
Fan Bingbing © Sun Jun
Jessica Chastain © Matt Doyle Photo
Gabriel Yared © Ammar Abd Rabbo
 

MAY PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

 
Includes Adventures in Moviegoing with Guillermo del Toro, Blow Out, Zatoichi and timeless classics (that were booed at Cannes)!
 
Tuesday, May 2
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Sea Horse* and L'Atalante

Taking to the water, this week's Short + Feature offers two very different - but equally dazzling - visions of the life aquatic. Jean Painlevé's mesmerizing short The Sea Horse (1933), a fourteen-minute science film that goes below the surface of the sea to glimpse the strange world of the titular creature, sets the stage for Jean Vigo's timeless masterpiece L'Atalante (1934), an intoxicating love story that takes place aboard a run-down river barge on the Seine.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, May 3
Blow Out*: Criterion Collection Edition #562

A conspiracy thriller for the ages, Brian De Palma's 1981 masterpiece features dazzling stylistic flourishes and John Travolta in one of his most memorable performances. The movie hits the Channel alongside all of the supplemental features from our release, including an hour-long interview with De Palma conducted by filmmaker Noah Baumbach, and De Palma's 1967 feature Murder à la Mod, which itself makes a cameo appearance in a scene in Blow Out.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Thursday, May 4
Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman: Criterion Collection Edition #679

Japan's longest-running action series centers on the adventures of Zatoichi (Shintaro Katsu), a blind masseur who also happens to be an incomparable swordsman. The inspiration for the blind warrior Chirrut Îmwe (Donnie Yen) in Rogue One, this charismatic action dynamo remains one of cinema's most iconic heroes. Our massive edition of the series features digital restorations of all twenty-five Zatoichi films made between 1962 and 1973, along with supplements that include an interview with Asian-film expert Tony Rayns and a 1978 documentary about Katsu, who portrayed Zatoichi through the entire length of the series and directed the twenty-fourth installment.
 
Friday, May 5
Friday Night Double Feature: The Element of Crime* and Europa*

This week's double bill brings together the bookends of Lars von Trier's Europa trilogy, two bold visions from his early career. The expressionist mystery The Element of Crime (1984), the director's stunning debut feature, takes place in a postapocalyptic future, while the Kafkaesque Europa (1991) immerses the viewer in a strangely futuristic Frankfurt in the aftermath of World War II.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Monday, May 8
John Bailey and Haskell Wexler on Days of Heaven

Terrence Malick's 1978 sophomore feature is a period drama of extraordinary visual beauty, depicting labor and leisure amid the wheat fields of the Texas panhandle in ravishing magic-hour images. In this piece, cinematographers John Bailey and Haskell Wexler share their memories of working on the film with Malick and Nestor Almendros, who took home an Oscar for the film's photography.
 
Tuesday, May 9
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Borom sarret* and Black Girl

The most renowned figure of twentieth-century African cinema, the Senegalese writer-director Ousmane Sembène crafted stark, stirring dramas that addressed urgent social and political concerns. This week's Short + Feature shows that his mastery of the form came early: his acclaimed short Borom sarret (1963), about a luckless cart driver on the streets of Dakar, bears witness to the personal effects of the postcolonial order, as does his harrowing first feature, Black Girl (1966), about a Senegalese woman mistreated by her white employers in a small town on the French Riviera.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, May 10
The Secret of the Grain*: Criterion Collection Edition #527

Six years before winning the Palme d'Or in 2013 for his controversial coming-of-age romance Blue Is the Warmest Color, Tunisian French filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche delivered this bustling, multigenerational saga about family and food. Our complete edition of the film arrives this week on the Channel, complete with Sueur, Kechiche's reedit of the film's climactic belly-dancing sequence, as well as interviews with the writer-director and many of his key collaborators.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, May 12
Friday Night Double Feature: Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words and News from Home

In celebration of Mother's Day this weekend, we've paired two moving portraits of maternal love. Stig Björkman's 2015 documentary Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words assembles Super 8 and 16 mm home-movie footage, taken by the icon herself, into an intimate view of her complex life as an artist, wife, and mother. Chantal Akerman's melancholy 1976 urban portrait News from Home pairs meditative shots of New York City, where the director relocated in the early seventies, with readings of letters from her mother on the voice-over.
 
Monday, May 15
Booed at Cannes!

From Michelangelo Antonioni to Lars von Trier, some of the world's most lauded auteurs have elicited derisive responses at their Cannes premieres, only to have their polarizing films later hailed as masterpieces. With the seventieth edition of the festival opening this week, we're gathering a selection of these controversial works: Antonioni's L'avventura (1960), Carl Th. Dreyer's Gertrud (1964), Robert Bresson's L'argent (1983), Jane Campion's Sweetie (1989), and von Trier's Antichrist (2009).
 
Tuesday, May 16
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Butter Lamp* and Yi Yi

The complex role of photography in everyday life is explored in Hu Wei's 2013 Oscar-nominated short Butter Lamp and Edward Yang's 2000 masterpiece Yi Yi. Hu's film charts the story of a photographer and his assistant as they take family portraits in a remote Tibetan village, in the process observing the erosion of local culture by the forces of globalization. Yang's intimate epic captures the tensions lying beneath the surface of contemporary middle-class Taipei, highlighting the perspective of a young boy who becomes obsessed with his camera.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, May 17
Fish Tank*: Criterion Collection Edition #553

This week, we're turning the spotlight on British filmmaker Andrea Arnold and her Cannes Jury Prize-winning Fish Tank. This gritty work of social realism follows the coming-of-age of a fifteen-year-old housing project resident (the remarkable Katie Jarvis) struggling with her burgeoning sexual attraction toward her mother's predatory new boyfriend (Michael Fassbender). The supplements from our edition include a conversation with Fassbender and three of the director's short films: Milk (1998), Dog (2001), and the Oscar-winning Wasp (2003).
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, May 18
Blow Up of Blow Up: A 2016 Documentary

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of Antonioni's countercultural masterpiece last year, Italian journalist Valentina Agostinis created this documentary portrait, which revisits key locations in the film, explores the auteur's meticulous approach to art direction and photography, and features interviews with dialogue assistant Piers Haggard, fashion photographer David Montgomery, former Yardbirds manager Simon Napier-Bell, and others.
 
Friday, May 19
Friday Night Double Feature: A Man Escaped and La Haine

This week, we've paired two films that share a spirit of rebellion and skillfully align our sympathies with the underdogs they portray: Robert Bresson's A Man Escaped (1956) and Mathieu Kassovitz's La haine (1995). Both Bresson's suspenseful yet humane jailbreak masterpiece and Kassovitz's gritty look at cultural volatility in contemporary France received the best director award at Cannes.
 
Monday, May 22
All the Screen's a Stage

This series lifts a curtain on the passions, triumphs, illusions, and foibles of theater people-and shows how such cinematic masters as Ingmar Bergman, Jean Renoir, and Max Ophuls have drawn inspiration from the art of stagecraft. The lineup - which includes Marcel Carné's Children of Paradise, Jean Renoir's The Golden Coach, and Ingmar Bergman's Fanny and Alexander - features a series introduction by Criterion Channel programmer Michael Sragow.
 
Tuesday, May 23
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Next Floor* and Babette's Feast

Treat yourself to a two-course meal: an early short by Denis Villeneuve (Arrival) gives a grotesque new meaning to the phrase "all you can eat," while Gabriel Axel's Oscar-winning adaptation of a story by Isak Dinesen serves up a feast for the spirit.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, May 24
I Knew Her Well: Criterion Collection Edition #801

Antonio Pietrangeli cuts commedia all'italiana with a dose of melancholy in this underappreciated classic, an episodic portrait of a beautiful young woman making her way through the celebrity-obsessed and sexually liberated Rome of the 1960s. This edition's supplements include a recent interview with actor Stefania Sandrelli (The Conformist), as well as archival footage from her audition for the film.
 
Thursday, May 25
Adventures in Moviegoing with Guillermo del Toro

In the latest installment of our Adventures in Moviegoing series, the director of Pan's Labyrinth and Cronos joins MythBusters' Adam Savage to talk about his cinematic passions and influences. To accompany their conversation, del Toro has selected some of the inspirations - including Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face and Jean Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast - that have helped fuel the nightmares and fantasies that play out in his own visionary films. Past contributors to the series include Jonathan Lethem, Mary Karr, Roger Corman, and Michael Cera.
 
Friday, May 26
Friday Night Double Feature: Rome Open City and Brief Encounter

What does Roberto Rossellini's revolutionary portrait of a city under occupation have in common with David Lean's achingly sad story of a love affair? Both of these heartbreakingly humane films were among the winners of the top prize at the 1946 Cannes Film Festival.
 
Monday, May 29
Observations on Film Art No. 7: Staging in The Rules of the Game

In the latest installment of our Observations on Film Art series, Professor Kristin Thompson maps out the intricate staging of Jean Renoir's The Rules of the Game. Famed for its deep-focus photography, the film nimbly traces the intersecting loves, rivalries, aggressions, and jealousies that play out over the course of a weekend at a country estate. Watch Thompson's analysis to learn how Renoir sets his tragicomic machine in motion, then check out the other entries in the series for more insights from her and her fellow authors of the canonical textbook Film Art: An Introduction, David Bordwell and Jeff Smith. Previous subjects include the music in Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent, the editing in Akira Kurosawa's Sanshiro Sugata, and landscapes in the work of Abbas Kiarostami.
 
Tuesday, May 30
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Cailleach* and I Know Where I'm Going!

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger set their sprightly romantic comedy I Know Where I'm Going! in the gloom of the remote Scottish Hebrides. That story of a headstrong woman's unexpected romance with a handsome naval officer is paired with Cailleach, a short documentary from 2015 that profiles another independent woman in the same location-one who knows where she's staying above all. Rosie Reed Hillman's tender portrait of Morag, an elderly sheep farmer who has lived her whole life in the rugged area, makes for a poetic complement to the Archers' effervescent fable.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

May 1
Bitter Victory, Nicholas Ray, 1957

May 2
The Sea Horse, Jean Painlevé, 1933

May 3
Blow Out, Brian De Palma, 1981

May 5
The Element of Crime, Lars von Trier, 1984
Europa, Lars von Trier, 1991
The Marriage of Chiffon, Claude Autant-Lara, 1942
Douce, Claude Autant-Lara, 1943
Sylvia and the Phantom, Claude Autant-Lara, 1946

May 9
Borom sarret, Ousmane Sembène, 1963

May 10
The Secret of the Grain, Abdellatif Kechiche, 2007

May 12
Nacional III, Luis García Berlanga, 1982
Barrios altos, Luis García Berlanga, 1987
La boutique, Luis García Berlanga, 1967

May 16
Butter Lamp, Hu Wei, 2013

May 17
Fish Tank, Andrea Arnold, 2009

May 19
Katzelmacher, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1969
Chinese Roulette, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1976
Satan's Brew, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1976
Querelle, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1982

May 23
Next Floor, Denis Villeneuve, 2008

May 30
Cailleach, Rosie Reed Hillman, 2014
 
 
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April 11, 2017

RISK — TRAILER

Laura Poitras's new documentary [about Julian Assange] premiered at Cannes last year where I saw the film in a packed house on the croisette. Global action heroes don't come any smarter or more composed than Julian Assange in the face of massive corporate and political malfeasance. "Risk" arrives this summer. If you only see one documentary this year, make sure it's RISK.

March 29, 2017

CANNES 70 — POSTER

Cannes 70

November 01, 2016

FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck has launched. This streaming collaboration between Kino Lorber, Criterion, and Turner Classic Movies is every film-lovers dream. This is going to be HUGE I tell ya!

August 11, 2016

COLE SMITHEY'S MOST ANTICIPATED FILMS AT NYFF 54

The films I most look forward to screening at the 54th New York Film Festival are informed by Cannes since many of the films in the NYFF main slate premiered there back in May. That said, there are plenty of other films I'll be able to screen because I have a running start. This is going to be fun!

Elle
Directed by Paul Verhoeven
France/Germany/Belgium, 2016, 131m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere

Elle

"Elle" was my favorite film at Cannes this year. I can't wait to see it again. This is one racy satirical thriller, and by racy I mean sexy, dark, and badass in a hyper-feminist way. "Paul Verhoeven’s first feature in a decade—and his first in French—ranks among his most incendiary, improbable concoctions: a wry, almost-screwball comedy of manners about a woman who responds to a rape by refusing the mantle of victimhood. As the film opens, Parisian heroine Michèle (a brilliant Isabelle Huppert) is brutally violated in her kitchen by a hooded intruder. Rather than report the crime, Michèle, the CEO of a video game company and daughter of a notorious mass murderer, calmly sweeps up the mess and proceeds to engage her assailant in a dangerous game of domination and submission in which her motivations remain a constant source of mystery, humor, and tension. A Sony Pictures Classics release." 

The 13th
Directed by Ava DuVernay
USA, 2016
World Premiere

Ava-DuVernay-and-Angela-Davis

I'm looking for Ava DuVernay's doc to set the proper cultural and political tone for the 2016 NYFF. The film promises to foster constructive discussion about addressing America's systemic racism and ongoing incremental genocide of black citizens by militarized State police. "The title of Ava DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing documentary refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which reads “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States.” The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass criminalization and the sprawling American prison industry is laid out by DuVernay with bracing lucidity. With a potent mixture of archival footage and testimony from a dazzling array of activists, politicians, historians, and formerly incarcerated women and men, DuVernay creates a work of grand historical synthesis. A Netflix original documentary."

20th Century Women
Directed by Mike Mills
USA, 2016
World Premiere

20th-Century-Women

The director behind the great LGBT drama "Beginners" (2010) puts together a dream-team cast for his self-penned observation of '70s era women's liberation.  Annette Bening, Elle Fanning, Alia Shawkat, Greta Gerwig, and Billy Crudup star in what could prove to be the hottest ticket at the festival. This film is a must-see if not for Annette Bening's appearance. Bening is a national treasure whose mastery of acting craft is beyond reproach. "Mike Mills’s texturally and behaviorally rich new comedy seems to keep redefining itself as it goes along, creating a moving group portrait of particular people in a particular place (Santa Barbara) at a particular moment in the 20th century (1979), one lovingly attended detail at a time. The great Annette Bening, in one of her very best performances, is Dorothea, a single mother raising her teenage son, Jamie (Lucas Jade Zumann), in a sprawling bohemian house, which is shared by an itinerant carpenter (Billy Crudup) and a punk artist with a Bowie haircut (Greta Gerwig) and frequented by Jamie’s rebellious friend Julie (Elle Fanning). 20th Century Women is warm, funny, and a work of passionate artistry. An A24 Release."

Aquarius
Directed by Kleber Mendonça Filho
Brazil/France, 2016, 142m
Portuguese with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere

Aquarius-de-Kleber-Mendonca-Filho

"Aquarius" contributes to the female-dominated films at this year's festival. I missed it at Cannes, but will be sure to catch this buzzed-about drama on the rebound. "A highlight of this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Kleber Mendonça Filho’s follow-up to his acclaimed Neighboring Sounds revolves around the leisurely days of a 65-year-old widow, transcendently played by the great Brazilian actress Sônia Braga. Clara is a retired music critic and the only remaining resident of the titular apartment building in Recife. Trouble starts when an ambitious real estate promoter who has bought up all of Aquarius’s other units comes knocking on Clara’s door. She has no intention of leaving, and a protracted struggle ensues. Braga’s transfixing, multilayered performance and the film’s deliberate pacing and stylistic flourishes yield a sophisticated, political, and humane work."

Fire at Sea / Fuocoammare
Directed by Gianfranco Rosi
Italy/France, 2016, 108m
English and Italian with English subtitles

Fuocoammare_di_Gianfranco_Rosi

The fact that this doc is a Kino Lorber release is reason enough to seek out this year's Winner of the Golden Bear at Berlin. "Gianfranco Rosi’s documentary observes Europe’s migrant crisis from the vantage point of a Mediterranean island where hundreds of thousands of refugees, fleeing war and poverty, have landed in recent decades. Rosi shows the harrowing work of rescue operations but devotes most of the film to the daily rhythms of Lampedusa, seen through the eyes of a doctor who treats casualties and performs autopsies, and a feisty but anxious pre-teen from a family of fishermen for whom it is simply a peripheral fact of life. With its emphasis on the quotidian, the film reclaims an ongoing tragedy from the abstract sensationalism of media headlines. A Kino Lorber release."

Manchester by the Sea
Directed by Kenneth Lonergan
USA, 2016, 137m

Manchester-by-the-sea

Writer/director Kenneth Lonergan promises a slice of authentic cinema with a solid cast. "Casey Affleck is formidable as the volatile, deeply troubled Lee Chandler, a Boston-based handyman called back to his hometown on the Massachusetts North Shore after the sudden death of his brother, Joe (Kyle Chandler), who has left behind a teenage son (Lucas Hedges). This loss and the return to his old stomping grounds summon Lee’s memories of an earlier, even more devastating tragedy. In his third film as a director, following You Can Count on Me (2000) and Margaret (2011), Kenneth Lonergan, with the help of a remarkable cast, unflinchingly explores grief, hope, and love, giving us a film that is funny, sharply observed, intimately detailed yet grand in emotional scale. An Amazon Studios Release."

Neruda
Directed by Pablo Larraín
Chile/Argentina/France/Spain, 2016, 107m
Spanish and French with English subtitles

Neruda

You had me at Neruda. "Pablo Larraín’s exciting, surprising, and colorful new film is not a biopic but, as the director himself puts it, a “Nerudean” portrait of the great Chilean poet Pablo Neruda’s years of flight and exile after his 1948 denunciation of his government’s leadership. Larraín’s heady blend of fact and fancy (the latter embodied in an invented character, straight out of detective fiction, played by Gael García Bernal) is many things at once: a loving, kaleidoscopic recreation of a particular historical moment; a comical cat-and-mouse game; and a pocket epic. Featuring Luis Gnecco, a dead ringer for the poet and a formidable actor, alongside a terrific cast. A release of The Orchard."

Sieranevada
Directed by Cristi Puiu
Romania, 2016, 173m
Romanian with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere

Sieranevada-cristi-puiu

Cristi Puiu is the real deal in his output as card-carrying member of the Romanian New Wave (see "The Death of Mr. Lazarescu"). File under "Must-See." "Cristi Puiu returns with a virtuosic chamber drama set largely within a labyrinthine Bucharest apartment where a cantankerous extended family has gathered forty days after its patriarch’s death (and three days after the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris). Rituals and meals are anticipated and delayed, doors open and close, and the camera hovers at thresholds and in corridors. As claustrophobia mounts, heated, humorous exchanges—about the old Communist days and the present age of terror—coalesce into a brilliantly staged and observed portrait of personal and social disquiet."

Things to Come / L’Avenir
Directed by Mia Hansen-Løve
France/Germany, 2016, 100m
French with English subtitles

Mia-Hansen-Løve-Lavenir

Isabelle Huppert makes her second appearance in the Festival, behind her Oscar-worthy performance in Paul Verhoeven's "Elle." If there's one actress I can never get enough it's the wonderful Isabelle Huppert. Sign this one with love. "In the new film from Mia Hansen-Løve (Eden), Isabelle Huppert is Nathalie, a Parisian professor of philosophy who comes to realize that the tectonic plates of her existence are slowly but inexorably shifting: her husband (André Marcon) leaves her, her mother (Edith Scob) comes apart, her favorite former student decides to live off the grid, and her first grandchild is born. Hansen-Løve carefully builds Things to Come around her extraordinary star: her verve and energy, her beauty, her perpetual motion. Huppert’s remarkable performance is counterpointed by the quietly accumulating force of the action, and the result is an exquisite expression of time’s passing. A Sundance Selects release."

Yourself and Yours
Directed by Hong Sangsoo
South Korea, 2016, 86m
Korean with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere

Yourself-and-yours

Hong Sangsoo's 2012 film "In Another Country" is a bold cinematic statement that commands inspection of this remarkable filmmaker's latest effort. "Prolific NYFF favorite Hong Sangsoo boldly and wittily continues his ongoing exploration of the painful caprices of modern romance. Painter Youngsoo (Kim Joo-hyuk) hears secondhand that his girlfriend, Minjung (Lee Yoo-young), has recently had (many) drinks with an unknown man. This leads to a quarrel that seems to end their relationship. The next day, Youngsoo sets out in search of her, at the same time that Minjung—or a woman who looks exactly like her and may or may not be her twin—has a series of encounters with strange men, some of whom claim to have met her before . . .  Yourself and Yours is a break-up/make-up comedy unlike any other, suffused with sophisticated modernist mystery."

CS SNM

July 04, 2016

Abbas Kiarostami (June 22, 1940 — July 4, 2016)


Cinema has lost a master-craftsman. We'll miss you Abbas.

Kiarostami

June 19, 2016

Von Trier's THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT ready for production

Lars-von-Trier

Variety reported that Danish auteur Lars von Trier has finished the script for his next film, "The House That Jack Built." The 10 million dollar-budgeted film will go into production in August. Von Trier's follow-up to "Nymphomaniac Vol. I and II" is a thriller that covers ten years in the development of a serial killer plying his trade in Washington D.C. Think "Man Bites Dog."  

At a recent Cannes press conference, the film's producer Louise Vesth said, “It will be a serial killer movie like you’ve never seen before. He [von Trier} wants to be able to change it between periods of shooting because when we’ll have done the body of the film in the fall, he will then go edit it and he sees how he can combine the murders.”

After being unceremoniously (and ridiculously) thrown out of the Cannes Festival by artistic director Thierry Fremaux in 2011 for jokey comments about Hitler (regarding his film "Melancholia"), von Trier was labeled "Persona Non Grata." Although Fremaux has since backtracked on the decision and said that the filmmaker is no longer banned from the festival and would be welcomed back in the future, it is doubtful that von Trier will ever return to Cannes after being treated so poorly. You can only be treated the way you let people treat you.  

May 27, 2016

CANNES 2016 — PHOTO JOURNAL

69CA1

TOWER BRIGHT

Mayor's lunch

69CA2

St. Honorat Island

JIM JARMUSCH

IGGY2

ELLE FANNING

NICHOLAS WINDING-REFN

IGGY

JACOB APPLEBAUMJacob Appelbaum at the after-party for Laura Poitras's RISK. FREE JULIEN ASSANGE

CANNES FROM THE FORT

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