195 posts categorized "Cinema"

June 05, 2018

SUSPIRIA — (REMAKE) TRAILER & POSTER

Suspiria

I'm not a fan of Hollywood's knee-jerk tendency to remaking movies, but this project looks promising. Luca Guadagnino is smart to do horror after making "Call Me By Your Name," an unintentionally camp classic if ever there was. I especially love the font for "SUSPIRIA" with the comb-like piano keyboard under it. Points for style all around. 

June 02, 2018

JUNE PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

 
JUNE PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Frank Capra's It Happened One Night
the Complete Monterey Pop Festival, and Aki Kaurismäki's The Other Side of Hope!
 
Friday, June 1
It Happened One Night*: Edition #736

Opposites attract with magnetic force in this romantic road-trip delight from Frank Capra, about a spoiled runaway socialite (Claudette Colbert) and a roguish man-of-the-people reporter (Clark Gable) who is determined to get the scoop on her scandalous disappearance. The first film to accomplish the very rare feat of sweeping all five major Oscar categories (best picture, best actor, best actress, best director, and best screenplay), It Happened One Night is among the most gracefully constructed and edited films of the early sound era, packed with clever situations and gags that have entered the Hollywood comedy pantheon and featuring two actors at the top of their game, sparking with a chemistry that has never been bettered. Supplemental features: a conversation between critics Molly Haskell and Phillip Lopate, an interview with Frank Capra Jr. from 1999, a feature-length documentary about the director's life and career, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, June 1
Friday Night Double Feature: A Streetcar Named Desire and The Fugitive Kind

Marlon Brando sizzles in these two hothouse melodramas based on the work of Tennessee Williams. In 1950, Elia Kazan turned Williams's most famous play, the Pulitzer Prize-winning A Streetcar Named Desire, into a big-screen sensation. Dripping with New Orleans atmosphere and featuring some of the most celebrated performances in Hollywood history, the film stars Vivien Leigh as tragic southern belle Blanche DuBois, who seeks shelter with her sister Stella (Kim Hunter) and brutishly sexy brother-in-law Stanley (Brando) after losing her home-and upends their lives in the process. A decade later, an all-star cast sank its teeth into Sidney Lumet's The Fugitive Kind. In this intense reimagining of Williams's Orpheus Descending-which would go on to be a major inspiration for David Lynch's Wild at Heart-a snakeskin-jacketed Brando plays a drifter who tries to go straight but becomes romantically entangled with a sexually frustrated married woman (Anna Magnani) and a wild child (Joanne Woodward).

Monday, June 4
Philip Kaufman Presents The Asphalt Jungle by John Huston

Philip Kaufman (The Right Stuff, The Unbearable Lightness of Being), one of the most accomplished and eclectic of all American directors, recently sat down with critic and programmer Michael Sragow to explore his formative experiences as a film lover. Among the topics they got into was his love for John Huston's meticulously calibrated 1950 crime drama The Asphalt Jungle. As an addition to Kaufman's Adventures in Moviegoing episode, we're presenting the film alongside a new introduction, in which Kaufman talks about his admiration for Huston's complex depiction of the criminal underworld and his expert craftsmanship.
 
Tuesday, June 5
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Old Man* and Easy Rider

1969 saw the release of Dennis Hopper's Easy Rider and the media circus ignited by the Manson murders, two seismic cultural events that cast a shadow on the freewheeling good vibes of the hippie era. This program brings together two films that capture the spirit of that chaotic year. In the 2012 experimental documentary Old Man, Brooklyn-based artist Leah Shore combines eye-popping animation with never-before-heard phone calls that Charles Manson made from jail to the infamous cult leader and Canadian author Marlin Marynick. In his directorial debut, Hopper created one of the great American road movies, a counterculture sensation that mixed New Wave-inspired aesthetics, a bold rock soundtrack, and star-making performances by Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson.
*Premiering on the Chanel this month
Wednesday, June 6
The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates: Edition #808
Featured on the Channel on the anniversary of Robert Kennedy's death, this edition gathers four films that are early exemplars of the movement known as Direct Cinema and showcase some of the greatest footage we have of American politics at work. Seeking to invigorate the American documentary format, which he felt was rote and uninspired, Robert Drew brought the style and vibrancy he had fostered as a Life magazine correspondent to filmmaking in the late fifties. He did this by assembling an amazing team-including such eventual nonfiction luminaries as Richard Leacock, D. A. Pennebaker, and Albert Maysles-that would transform documentary cinema. In 1960, the group was granted direct access to John F. Kennedy, filming him on the campaign trail and eventually in the Oval Office. This resulted in three films of remarkable, behind-closed-doors intimacy - PrimaryAdventures on the New Frontier, and Crisis - and, following the president's assassination, the poetic short Faces of NovemberSupplemental features: an alternate cut of Primary; an audio commentary; a documentary featuring archival footage; outtakes from Crisis; an interview with Richard Reeves, author of President Kennedy: Profile of Power; a conversation about Crisis featuring former U.S. attorney general Eric Holder and Sharon Malone, Holder's wife and the sister of Vivian Malone, one of the students featured in Crisis; and more.

Thursday, June 7
Adventures in Moviegoing with Marlon James
The movies have always been a source of inspiration and escape for this month's guest curator, Man Booker Prize-winning novelist Marlon James (A Brief History of Seven Killings). Growing up in Jamaica in the seventies, he got his first taste of international cinema by watching the country's one TV station, which played art-house staples like Fanny and AlexanderThe Seventh Seal, and . In this episode of Adventures in Moviegoing, James talks with Antonio Monda, artistic director of the Rome Film Festival, about this experience and others that shaped his tastes, including his first time seeing a movie in a theater (Come Back, Charleston Blue) and his encounter with Happy Together, which he considers the "only effective depiction of a gay relationship" on-screen. Alongside the interview, James has also handpicked a selection of all-time favorites, including Alfonso Cuarón's Y tu mamá también, Dusan Makavejev's Sweet Movie, and Errol Morris's The Thin Blue Line.
Friday, June 8
Friday Night Double Feature: Million Dollar Mermaid and The Lure
The myth of the mermaid serves as a jumping-off point for these two showbiz musicals replete with siren songs. A biopic of the Australian swimmer turned early-cinema star Annette Kellerman, the Busby Berkeley-choreographed Million Dollar Mermaid follows its heroine from Sydney and London to New York and Hollywood as she becomes embroiled in a love triangle with her promoter and her manager. Then, Agnieszka Smoczyńska's genre-defying horror-musical mash-up features a pair of carnivorous mermaid sisters who venture onto land and become the star act at a Polish nightclub.
Tuesday, June 12
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Madame Tutli-Putli* and The Lady Vanishes

Train cars set the scene for nightmares and mysteries in this locomotive pairing. In Chris Lavis and Maciek Szczerbowski's painstakingly animated short, a timid woman sets off on a bizarre train journey that descends into terror. Five years in the making, Madame Tutli-Putli has an eerie tone that owes much to its innovative compositing process, which allowed the filmmakers to merge live-action footage of actors' eyes with stop-motion puppets. In Alfred Hitchcock's quick-witted and devilish comic thriller, a plucky young woman on a trip across Europe meets a kindly spinster, who then seems to vanish into thin air. The master of suspense brings a light touch to this scenario, ingeniously orchestrating a breathless adventure within the confines of a train.
*Premiering on the Channel this month
Wednesday, June 13
Death by Hanging: Edition #798

Genius provocateur Nagisa Oshima, an influential figure in the Japanese New Wave of the 1960s, made one of his most startling political statements with the compelling pitch-black satire Death by Hanging. In this macabre farce, a Korean man is sentenced to death in Japan but survives his execution, sending the authorities into a panic about what to do next. At once disturbing and oddly amusing, Oshima's constantly surprising film is a subversive and surreal indictment of both capital punishment and the treatment of Korean immigrants in his country. Supplemental features: an interview with critic Tony Rayns, Oshima's 1965 short Diary of Yunbogi, and more.
Thursday, June 14
The Complete Monterey Pop Festival: Edition #167
On a beautiful June weekend in 1967, at the beginning of the Summer of Love, the Monterey International Pop Festival roared forward, capturing a decade's spirit and ushering in a new era of rock and roll. Monterey featured career-making performances by Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Otis Redding, but they were just a few of the performers in a wildly diverse lineup that also included Simon and Garfunkel, the Mamas and the Papas, the Who, the Byrds, Hugh Masekela, and the extraordinary Ravi Shankar. With his characteristic vérité style-and a camera crew that included the likes of Albert Maysles and Richard Leacock-D. A. Pennebaker captured it all, immortalizing moments that have become legend: Pete Townshend smashing his guitar, Jimi Hendrix burning his, Mama Cass watching Janis Joplin's performance in awe. This Criterion edition is the most comprehensive document of the Monterey Pop Festival ever produced, featuring the films Monterey Pop, Jimi Plays Monterey, and Shake! Otis at Monterey, along with every available complete performance filmed by Pennebaker and his crew and additional rare outtakes. Supplemental features: two hours of performances not included in Monterey Pop; audio commentaries, new interviews with festival producer Lou Adler and Pennebaker; Chiefs, a short film by Richard Leacock; and more.
 
Friday, June 15
Friday Night Double Feature: Whisky Galore! and Brigadoon

Remote Scottish locales are disrupted and transformed by the outside world in a boozy Ealing comedy and an underappreciated Vincente Minnelli masterpiece. Alexander Mackendrick (Sweet Smell of Success) made his directing debut with Whisky Galore!, a gleefully antiauthoritarian comedy in which a sinking ship loaded with 50,000 barrels of whisky breaks the wartime alcohol shortage on a Scottish island. Adapted from the Broadway hit by Frederick Loewe and Alan Jay Lerner, Minnelli's stunning CinemaScope musical Brigadoon stars Gene Kelly as an American on a hunting trip in Scotland who discovers a magical village lost in time and falls in love with one of its inhabitants.
 
Tuesday, June 19
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Edmond Was a Donkey* and Au Hasard Balthazar

The burdens of donkeyhood hold a mirror up to the human condition in these parables of everyday cruelty. Franck Dion's animated short concerns Edmond, a diminutive office drone mocked and bullied by his coworkers, who jeeringly crown him with a paper donkey hat. Instead of wounding him, though, this prank triggers an awakening of Edmond's animal identity. Then, Robert Bresson's hallowed classic follows the donkey Balthazar as he is passed from owner to owner and suffers for the sins of mankind, his life paralleling that of his first keeper, Marie (Anne Wiazemsky).
*Premiering on the Channel this month
Wednesday, June 20
Mildred Pierce: Edition #860
Melodrama casts noirish shadows in this portrait of maternal sacrifice from Hollywood master Michael Curtiz. Its iconic performance by Joan Crawford as Mildred, a single mother hell-bent on freeing her children from the stigma of economic hardship, solidified Crawford's career comeback and gave the actor her only Oscar. But as Mildred pulls herself up by the bootstraps, first as an unflappable waitress and eventually as the well-heeled owner of a successful restaurant chain, the ingratitude of her materialistic firstborn (a diabolical Ann Blyth) becomes a venomous serpent's tooth, setting in motion an endless cycle of desperate overtures and heartless recriminations. Recasting James M. Cain's rich psychological novel as a murder mystery, this bitter cocktail of blind parental love and all-American ambition is both unremittingly hard-boiled and sumptuously emotional. Supplemental features: a conversation with critics Molly Haskell and Robert Polito, excerpt from a 1970 episode of The David Frost Show featuring actor Joan Crawford, a feature-length documentary about Crawford, and more.
Friday, June 22
Friday Night Double Feature: From Here to Eternity and Some Came Running
The work of American novelist James Jones provides the basis for these two star-studded Hollywood melodramas. Fred Zinnemann's Oscar-winning classic From Here to Eternity(1953), an adaptation of Jones's National Book Award-winning first novel, is a chronicle of military life on a Hawaiian base leading up to the attack on Pearl Harbor, with a flawless cast featuring Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift, Frank Sinatra, Deborah Kerr, and Donna Reed. Sinatra, who won an Oscar for his role, also stars in Vincente Minnelli's big-screen version of Jones's sprawling second novel, Some Came Running (1958), in which an alcoholic novelist returns home to small-town Indiana after the war and finds himself at a crossroads.
Friday, June 22
Art-House America: Northwest Film Forum, Seattle, Washington
Hype!, Doug Pray, 1996

The Channel-exclusive series Art-House America recently visited Seattle's Northwest Film Forum, a grassroots theater that has become a vibrant hub for a diverse mix of visual media and live events. Alongside our documentary profile about the venue, we're presenting a selection of films near and dear to the theater's programmers. The latest addition to the series is Doug Pray's landmark grunge-rock documentary Hype! (1996), a brisk and captivating film that charts the early-nineties rise of such legendary Seattle bands as Nirvana, Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden. In 2016, the NWFF played host to a memorable twentieth-anniversary screening that was attended by many of the musicians featured in the film.
Monday, June 25
Observations on Film Art No. 20: Editing Techniques in The Devil and Daniel Webster

The conventions of continuity editing became standardized over a hundred years ago, and they remain the dominant style of editing in popular cinema around the world. In the latest episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that gives viewers a ten-minute dose of film school every month, scholar Jeff Smith examines the classical cutting of William Dieterle's Faustian satire The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941). Smith finds that, in the film, Dieterle and editor Robert Wise make textbook use of such common editing techniques as crosscuts, dissolves, and eyeline matches, while at the same time demonstrating the expressive possibilities of the continuity system's so-called rules.
Tuesday, June 26
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Begone Dull Care* and Elevator to the Gallows

The sounds of legendary jazz musicians permeate these two gems. In their experimental animated short Begone Dull Care (1949), filmmakers Norman McLaren and Evelyn Lambert create a kaleidoscopic visual representation of the music of jazz pianist Oscar Peterson, whose vibrant rhythms are mirrored by an array of abstract drawn-on-film images. Louis Malle's impeccably crafted debut feature, the Jeanne Moreau-starring crime thriller Elevator to the Gallows, boasts an improvised score by Miles Davis that heightens the seductively forlorn atmosphere of the film's Parisian nightscape.
*Premiering on the Chanel this month

Wednesday, June 27
The Other Side of Hope*: Edition #922

This wry, melancholic comedy from Aki Kaurismäki, a response to the ongoing global refugee crisis, follows two people searching for a place to call home. Khaled (Sherwan Haji), a displaced Syrian, lands in Helsinki as a stowaway; meanwhile, middle-aged Finnish salesman Wikström (Sakari Kuosmanen) leaves his wife and his job and buys a conspicuously unprofitable restaurant. Khaled is denied asylum but decides not to return to Aleppo-and the paths of the two men cross fortuitously. As deadpan as the best of the director's work, and with a deep well of empathy for its down-but-not-out characters (many of them played by members of Kaurismäki's loyal stock company), The Other Side of Hope is a bittersweet celebration of pockets of human kindness in an unwelcoming world. Supplemental features: an interview with Sherwan Haji, footage from the press conference at the Berlin International Film Festival, and a new video essay by filmmaker Daniel Raim, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month
 
Friday, June 29
Friday Night Double Feature: The Killing of a Chinese Bookie and Reservoir Dogs

Colorful characters are the focus of these idiosyncratic (and independently made) spins on the gangster film. In John Cassavetes's The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976), Ben Gazzara stars as a suave gentleman's club owner deep in debt to the mob and feeling the squeeze. Quentin Tarantino loved Timothy Carey's eccentric turn in that movie so much that he auditioned him for a role in his gritty and stripped-down first feature, Reservoir Dogs (1992), in which six criminals (among them Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, and Steve Buscemi), all of them using color-coded pseudonyms, try to get to the bottom of who's to blame after a botched diamond heist.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
June 1
It Happened One Night, Frank Capra, 1934
 
June 5
Old Man, Leah Shore, 2012
 
June 12
Madame Tutli-Putli, Chris Lavis and Maciek Szczerbowski, 2007
 
June 19
Edmond was a Donkey, Franck Dion, 2012
 
June 26
Begone Dull Care, Norman McLaren, 1949
 
June 29
The Other Side of Hope, Aki Kaurismäki, 2017
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE
 

May 31, 2018

The sculpture gallery's upstairs.

ColeLAMF

"The sculpture gallery's upstairs. Would you like to see it?"

—Eyes Wide Shut

May 17, 2018

SPIKE LEE — BLACKKKLANSMAN CANNES PRESS CONFERENCE

Blackkklansman

May 15, 2018

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY — TRAILER

Scheduled for release on November 2, Bohemian Rhapsody already looks like a shoe-in come Oscar-nomination season. 

The movie stars Rami Malek in the title role as Freddie Mercury. Lucy Boynton, Gwilym Lee, Ben Hardy, Joseph Mazzello, Aiden Gillen, Tom Hollander, and Mike Myers also star. In spite of all of the musical chairs regarding directors and actors, this looks to be a very entertaining experience. 

May 02, 2018

FAHRENHEIT 451 — POSTER ART

Fahrenheit-451-poster

The new poster for Ramin Bahrani's adaptation of the Ray Bradbury classic gives an enticing sense of this film's retro-modern take on the socially relevant subject matter. The casting looks promising. I don't think Michael Shannon has ever given a less than stellar performance in anything he's done. Michael B. Jordan certainly has the stature for the role of Guy Montag. Rev your engines and get out your fire extinguishers; it's getting hot. 

April 30, 2018

MAY PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
MAY PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Richard Linklater's Slacker
the cinema of Kelly Reichardt, and nine films from Cannes '68!
 
Tuesday, May 1
From the Archives: High Noon*

Gary Cooper stars in this real-time western as a sheriff looking forward to retirement and marriage whose plans are upended by the news that a gang of outlaws are on their way to gun him down. Though his Quaker bride (Grace Kelly, in her first major film role) wants him to flee and the townspeople refuse to help him, his sense of duty compels him to stand his ground until the fateful hour. Shot through with political resonance-the screenplay was written by Carl Foreman, a victim of the Hollywood blacklist-High Noon reimagined the most quintessentially American genre as a moral testing ground for the individual conscience. This edition features an early Criterion commentary, never before released on Blu-ray or DVD, by professor Howard Suber.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, May 1
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Skunk* and Fish Tank

Annie Silverstein and Andrea Arnold both earned attention at the Cannes Film Festival for these coming-of-age stories about adolescent girls growing up in tough economic circumstances and learning to confront the sexual power wielded by men. Silverstein's short film, winner of the Cinéfondation Award in 2014, is an intimate portrait of Leila, a fourteen-year-old girl who is intimidated by the advances of a dogfighting boy. Fish Tank, winner of the Cannes Jury Prize in 2009, follows the fifteen-year-old Mia (Katie Jarvis), an aspiring dancer whose burgeoning sexuality commands the attention of her mother's new boyfriend (Michael Fassbender).
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
Tuesday, May 1
Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins: Uptight*

As a guest curator on the Channel-exclusive series Adventures in Moviegoing, Barry Jenkins highlights one of the most radical American films of the 1960s, a ripped-from-the-headlines remake of John Ford's The Informer set in Cleveland in the immediate aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination. When Tank Williams (Julian Mayfield), an unemployed black steelworker, backs out of a plan to steal guns and turns his militant friend into the police, he finds himself running for his life, pursued by a group of vengeful revolutionaries. The first film that director Jules Dassin made in the U.S. after two decades of blacklisting and exile, this uncompromising vision was also a labor of love for cowriter, costar, and coproducer Ruby Dee, whom Jenkins discusses as the film's auteur in a new introduction.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
Wednesday, May 2
Slacker: Edition #247

This breakthrough film from director Richard Linklater presents a day in the life of a loose-knit Austin, Texas, subculture populated by eccentric and overeducated young people. Shooting on 16 mm for a mere $3,000, writer-producer-director Linklater and his crew of friends threw out any idea of a traditional plot, choosing instead to create a tapestry of over a hundred characters, each as compelling as the last. Slacker is a prescient look at an emerging generation of aggressive nonparticipants, and one of the key films of the American independent film movement of the 1990s. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: three audio commentaries, featuring Linklater and members of the cast and crew; It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1988), Linklater's first full-length feature, with commentary by the director; Woodshock, a 1985 16 mm short by Linklater and director of photography Lee Daniel; casting tapes featuring select "auditions" from the more-than-100-member cast; home movies; and more.
Friday, May 4
Friday Night Double Feature: Spark of Being and The Spirit of the Beehive
It's alive! In this week's double feature, two filmmakers keenly attuned to the eerie textures of the past reanimate the tale of Frankenstein. Bill Morrison's Spark of Being is an oblique retelling of Mary Shelley's Gothic novel using material found in film archives. Scored by trumpeter Dave Douglas, Morrison's film mimics the monster's resurrection by stitching together and breathing life into decaying fragments. Then, Víctor Erice's haunting period piece centers on a six-year-old bewitched by James Whale's Frankenstein (1931), who searches for signs of the monster's existence in the silence that blankets the Spanish village where she lives. 
 
Tuesday, May 8
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Black Case* and Day of Wrath
These harrowing black-and-white thrillers explore the strictest codes of Christianity and the brutality of intolerance. Caroline Monnet and Daniel Watchorn's hallucinatory short takes place in the infirmary of a school for Native American children in Canada, where a young girl watches in terror as a menacing doctor and nurse attend to her and her infant cousin. Made under the Nazi occupation of Denmark, Carl Theodor Dreyer's Day of Wrath takes place in a seventeenth-century village consumed by fear of witchcraft, where a young woman falls in love with her stepson, setting off a chain of disastrous consequences.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, May 9
The Color of Pomegranates: Edition #918
A breathtaking fusion of poetry, ethnography, and cinema, Sergei Parajanov's masterwork overflows with unforgettable images and sounds. In a series of tableaux that blend the tactile with the abstract, The Color of Pomegranates revives the splendors of Armenian culture through the story of the eighteenth-century troubadour Sayat-Nova, charting his intellectual, artistic, and spiritual growth through iconographic compositions rather than traditional narrative. The film's tapestry of folklore and metaphor departed from the realism that dominated the Soviet cinema of its era, leading authorities to block its distribution, with rare underground screenings presenting it in a restructured form. This edition features the cut closest to Parajanov's original vision, in a restoration that brings new life to one of cinema's most enigmatic meditations on art and beauty. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary featuring critic, filmmaker, and festival programmer Tony Rayns; a rarely seen 1969 documentary by Mikhail Vartanov featuring footage of director Sergei Parajanov at work; a video essay on the film's symbols and references, featuring scholar James Steffen; and more.
Thursday, May 10
Cannes '68: Cinema in Revolt

As the film world heads to the Croisette, we're commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Cannes that fell apart. The 1968 edition of the festival opened, amid widespread civil unrest, with a restoration of Victor Fleming's Gone with the Wind, but it wasn't long before filmmakers began pulling their movies from the schedule, in solidarity with the workers and students protesting across France. To mark the fiftieth anniversary of this abruptly canceled Cannes, we've gathered select titles from the year's official lineup, alongside a scene-setting introduction by film historian Dudley Andrew. Decide for yourself which film should have won the never-presented Palme d'Or: Richard Lester's Petulia*, Alain Resnais's Je t'aime, je t'aime*, Carlos Saura's Peppermint Frappé, Jan Němec's A Report on the Party and the Guests, Kaneto Shindo's Kuroneko, Miklós Jancsó's The Red and the White*, Valerio Zurlini's Black Jesus*, or the lately departed Milos Forman's The Firemen's Ball. Also included in our series is Federico Fellini's Toby Dammit, which was set to screen that year out of competition.
*Premiering on the Channel this month
Friday, May 11
Friday Night Double Feature: Dogville and Baal*

The iconoclastic playwright Bertolt Brecht finds cinematic expression in these two auteurist works. Danish enfant terrible Lars von Trier shot the Nicole Kidman-starring Dogville (2003), a tale of hypocrisy in small-town USA inspired by Brecht and Kurt Weill's The Threepenny Opera, on a soundstage with a bare minimum of props and sets, achieving through his stripped-down staging the kind of "alienation effect" Brecht originated onstage. With Baal (1970), an unruly adaptation of Brecht's first full-length work, Volker Schlöndorff cast fellow New German Cinema icon Rainer Werner Fassbinder in the role of a womanizing, schnapps-soaked poet who rebels against the society that has cast him out.
Monday, May 14
Adventures in Moviegoing with Megan Abbott: Sunset Boulevard
Acclaimed novelist Megan Abbott, who made her screenwriting debut last year on David Simon's hit HBO drama The Deuce, recently sat down with film critic Michael Sragow to recount some of her most formative moviegoing experiences. Among the films she fell in love with during family trips to the revival house in her hometown of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, was Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard. This month, we're presenting the immortal classic on the Channel alongside Abbott's personal introduction to the film, in which she positions Gloria Swanson's fading silent star as the moral center of the movie, and talks about how William Holden's unsuccessful screenwriter became a model for the antihero of one of her own best crime novels, 2007's The Song Is You.
 
Tuesday, May 15
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Burden* and 42nd Street

Hard work takes center stage in these two beguiling musicals. In Niki Lindroth von Bahr's award-winning short The Burden (2017), a deadpan stop-motion fantasy, song and dance provide a much-needed release for the animals working soul-crushing jobs at a roadside mall. Lloyd Bacon's 1933 backstage classic 42nd Street, featuring dazzling choreography by Busby Berkeley (whose influence can be seen in The Burden), revolves around the frenzied production of a fictional Broadway show that gives its beleaguered director (Warner Baxter) a final shot at success and catapults an understudy (Ruby Keeler) to stardom.
*Premiering on the Channel this month

Wednesday, May 16
Branded to Kill: Edition #38

When Japanese New Wave bad boy Seijun Suzuki delivered this brutal, hilarious, and visually inspired masterpiece to the executives at his studio, he was promptly fired. Branded to Kill tells the ecstatically bent story of a yakuza assassin with a fetish for sniffing steamed rice (the chipmunk-cheeked superstar Joe Shishido) who botches a job and ends up a target himself. This is Suzuki at his most extreme-the flabbergasting pinnacle of his sixties pop-art aesthetic. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: interviews with director Seijun Suzuki, assistant director Masami Kuzuu, and actor Joe Shishido.
Friday, May 18
Friday Night Double Feature: A Face in the Crowd and Network
These two mass-media satires, both made decades ago, are eerily tuned in to the current political moment. Elia Kazan's A Face in the Crowd (1957) charts the unlikely rise of Larry "Lonesome" Rhodes (Andy Griffith), a drifter who gets "discovered" in the local drunk tank and eventually winds up a TV star and political kingmaker. In Sidney Lumet's equally biting Network (1976)-for which screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky and actors Faye Dunaway, Peter Finch, and Beatrice Straight all won Oscars-a flailing news network gets a ratings boost when a veteran anchorman (Finch) threatens to kill himself on air, and the head of programming (Dunaway) decides to steer the station in a more sensational direction.
Tuesday, May 22
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Limbo* and Lord of the Flies
Youth runs wild in these island-bound parables. In award-winning Greek filmmaker Konstantina Kotzamani's arresting 2016 short Limbo, a group of children discover a whale carcass that has been washed ashore. With the 1963 Lord of the Flies, experimental theater director Peter Brook takes an innovative, documentary-like approach to William Golding's tale of lost boys stranded on an uninhabited island.
*Premiering on the Channel this month
 
Wednesday, May 23
Insomnia: Edition #47

In this elegantly unsettling murder mystery, Stellan Skarsgård plays an enigmatic Swedish detective with a checkered past who arrives in a small town in northern Norway to investigate the death of a teenage girl. As he digs deeper into the facts surrounding the heinous killing, his own demons and the tyrannical midnight sun begin to take a toll. The success of Erik Skjoldbjærg's chilling procedural anticipated the international hunger for Scandinavian noirs and serial- killer fictions, and the film features one of Skarsgård's greatest performances. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a conversation between director Erik Skjoldbjærg and actor Stellan Skarsgård, and two short films by Skjoldbjærg: Near Winter (1993) and Close to Home (1994).
 
Thursday, May 24
Observations on Film Art No. 19: Color Motifs in Black Narcissus
In one of the defining partnerships in British cinema, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger made a string of masterpieces that took Technicolor to sublime heights. For this month's episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that delivers ten minutes of film school a month, scholar Kristin Thompson explores the lush palette of their 1947 Black Narcissus. Set in a convent run by Anglican nuns in the Himalayas, this captivating drama depicts the isolation and extreme weather of the landscape, which combines with interpersonal tensions to drive these pious heroines mad. Thompson's episode focuses on how the Oscar-winning work of production designer Alfred Junge and cinematographer Jack Cardiff creates an otherworldly atmosphere that affects the psychological arc of the characters.
Friday, May 25
Friday Night Double Feature: Sisters and What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?

Sibling bonds turn sour in this diabolical double bill. De Palma's first foray into horror voyeurism, Sisters follows the twisted relationship that forms between a fashion model, her former conjoined twin, and a hotshot reporter who suspects the latter of murder. Taking its cues from Hitchcock, De Palma's scary and stylish paean to female destructiveness features a spine-tingling score from the great Bernard Herrmann. Robert Aldrich's 1962 What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? is a dark and devilishly comedic showcase for two of Hollywood's most notorious enemies, Joan Crawford and Bette Davis, who play a sadistic, washed-up actor and her embittered, wheelchair-bound sister.
 
Monday, May 28
Kelly Reichardt Masterclass

In her exquisitely subtle character studies, American filmmaker Kelly Reichardt is attuned to both the grandeur of sprawling landscapes and the rich complexities of human relationships. For this episode of Masterclass, we go to the American Cinematheque in Los Angeles for the tenth-anniversary celebration of cutting-edge indie distributor Oscilloscope Laboratories, where the writer-director sat down for a conversation with film critic April Wolfe. Watch the talk alongside some time with Reichardt's celebrated films: River of Grass*, Old Joy*, Wendy and Lucy, and Meek's Cutoff*.
*Premiering on the Channel this month
 
Tuesday, May 29
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Alphabet and Altered States

Two of cinema's great provocateurs push at the limits of consciousness in these mind-benders. Combining animation and live action, David Lynch's nightmarish 1968 experimental short dives into a sick woman's nightmare involving an endless recitation of the alphabet. An early precursor to the auteur's idiosyncratic style, the film won him a grant from the American Film Institute, which allowed him to begin fully pursuing his career as a director. Hailed by Roger Ebert as "a clever and brilliant machine for making us feel awe, fear, and humor," the 1980 film Altered States showcases Ken Russell's flair for excess, which he brings to the story of an abnormal psychologist (William Hurt, in his debut role) experimenting with sensory deprivation and hallucinatory drugs.
 
Wednesday, May 30
Badlands: Edition #651

Badlands announced the arrival of a major talent: Terrence Malick. His impressionistic take on the notorious Charles Starkweather killing spree of the late 1950s uses a serial-killer narrative as a springboard for an oblique teenage romance, lovingly and idiosyncratically enacted by Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek. The film introduced many of the elements that would earn Malick his passionate following: the enigmatic approach to narrative and character, the unusual use of voice-over, the juxtaposition of human violence with natural beauty, the poetic investigation of American dreams and nightmares. This debut has spawned countless imitations, but none have equaled its strange sublimity. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a 2012 documentary featuring actors Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek and art director Jack Fisk; interviews from 2012 with associate editor Billy Weber and executive producer Edward Pressman; and more.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
May 1
High Noon, Fred Zinnemann, 1952
Uptight, Jules Dassin, 1968
Skunk, Annie Silverstein, 2014
 
May 8
The Black Case, Caroline Monnet and Daniel Watchorn, 2014
 
May 10
Petulia, Richard Lester, 1968
Je t'aime, je t'aime, Alain Resnais, 1968
The Red and the White, Miklós Jancsó, 1967
Black Jesus, Valerio Zurlini, 1968
Toby Dammit, Federico Fellini, 1968
 
May 11
Baal, Volker Schlöndorff, 1970
 
May 15
The Burden, Niki Lindroth von Bahr, 2017
 
May 22
Limbo, Konstantina Kotzamani, 2016
 
May 28
River of Grass, Kelly Reichardt, 1994
Old Joy, Kelly Reichardt, 2006
Wendy and Lucy, Kelly Reichardt, 2008
Meek's Cutoff, Kelly Reichardt, 2010
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE

March 28, 2018

APRIL PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
APRIL PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Nicholas Ray's In A Lonely Place
Adventures in Moviegoing with Adam Gopnik, and five color films by Ozu!
 
Sunday, April 1
Adventures in Moviegoing with Megan AbbottIn a Lonely Place*

Cinema has been an important part of Megan Abbott's life since her days growing up in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, when her family would make trips to the local revival house. In her episode of Adventures in Moviegoing, the award-winning novelist spoke with programmer Michael Sragow about films she loves, including ones that have influenced her approach to crime fiction. This month, we're adding one of her all-time favorites to her personally curated series: Nicholas Ray's emotionally charged adaptation of the Dorothy B. Hughes thriller In a Lonely Place. A brilliant, turbulent mix of suspenseful noir and devastating melodrama, fueled by powerhouse performances from Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame, the film follows a gifted but washed-up screenwriter who becomes the prime suspect in a Tinseltown murder. Watch it on the Channel with a new introduction by Abbott.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, April 3
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Monkey Love Experiments* and Koko: A Talking Gorilla

Two different takes on the complex relationship between humans and primates. Combining stop-motion animation, live-action, and CG, Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson's BAFTA-nominated 2014 short Monkey Love Experiments tells the story of a misguided monkey who believes he's destined for the moon. In Koko: A Talking Gorilla, acclaimed director Barbet Schroeder and cinematographer Nestor Almendros create an intimate documentary portrait of the world-famous title subject, exploring the ethical concerns surrounding a controversial experiment that sought to teach her human communication through American Sign Language.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, April 4
Metropolitan*: Edition #326
 
One of the great American independent films of the 1990s, the surprise hit Metropolitan, by writer-director Whit Stillman, is a sparkling comedic chronicle of a young man's romantic misadventures while trying to fit in to New York City's debutante society. Stillman's deft, literate dialogue and hilariously highbrow observations earned this first film an Academy Award nomination for best original screenplay. Beneath the wit and sophistication, though, lies a tender tale of adolescent anxiety. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Stillman, editor Christopher Tellefsen, and actors Chris Eigeman and Taylor Nichols; and rare outtakes and alternate casting, with commentary by Stillman.
 
Thursday, April 5
Art-House America: Gold Town Nickelodeon, Juneau, Alaska
Local Hero, Bill Forsyth, 1983
 
Last year, the Channel-exclusive series Art-House America took a trip to Juneau, Alaska, where intrepid programmer Colette Costa runs a downtown movie theater catering to year-round locals in the country's cruise-ship capital. Alongside our documentary portrait of this bustling venue, Costa has been programming an ongoing selection of films that capture "what it feels like to live in Alaska." The latest addition to the series is Bill Forsyth's 1983 Local Hero, presented in a limited engagement. Mixing wry comedy and unexpected pathos, and featuring music by Mark Knopfler, this stirring ode to Forsyth's native Scotland follows a Texas oil executive (Peter Riegert) whose life is changed when his boss (Burt Lancaster) sends him to a Scottish village to buy up land for a new refinery.
Friday, April 6
Friday Night Double Feature: Night Moves and My Night at Maud's
 
"I saw a Rohmer film once. It was kinda like watching paint dry." So says Gene Hackman, famously, in Arthur Penn's 1975 neo-noir Night Moves, a film that contains striking parallels and references to the French director's wonderfully talky 1969 My Night at Maud's. Penn's New Hollywood masterpiece centers on Harry Moseby (Hackman), a retired professional football player turned Los Angeles private investigator who finds himself embroiled in the complex case of a runaway teen. One of the most acclaimed entries in the influential series "Six Moral Tales," Rohmer's film features Jean-Louis Trintignant as a pious Catholic engineer whose rigid ethical standards are challenged when he unwittingly spends the night at the apartment of a bold, brunette divorcée.
 
Monday, April 9
Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins: The Summer of Flying Fish*
 
Not long after winning an Oscar last year for Moonlight, Barry Jenkins joined Criterion's Peter Becker for an intimate conversation about his personal journey as a movie lover, the filmmakers who have influenced his style, and finding his relationship to cinema as a person of color. Alongside some of his favorite classics, he championed some little-seen gems, including Chilean director Marcela Said's 2013 narrative feature debut, The Summer of Flying Fish. A vivid coming-of-age story and a powerful allegory about environmental destruction, this richly atmospheric drama follows a teenage girl as she goes on vacation with her father, a wealthy landowner who becomes obsessed with eliminating the carp fish from his artificial lagoon. Featuring a new introduction from Jenkins, the film streams on the Channel in a limited engagement.
*Premiering on the Criterion Channel this month.
Tuesday, April 10
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Manhatta and The Naked City
The New York of the past comes to life in these two portraits, shot in different periods in the city's history. A pioneering work of American avant-garde cinema, the silent short Manhatta (1921)- directed by photographer Paul Strand and painter Charles Sheeler-takes in the modern metropolis from a variety of soaring perspectives, assembling a miniature symphony of the city in all its industrial splendor. Shot on location more than a quarter of a century later, Jules Dassin's masterpiece The Naked City (1948), a noir procedural inspired by Italian neorealism, offers a grittier view of Lower Manhattan from street level.
 
Wednesday, April 11
The 400 Blows: Edition #5
 
François Truffaut's first feature is also his most personal. Told from the point of view of Truffaut's cinematic counterpart, Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud), The 400 Blows sensitively re-creates the trials of Truffaut's own childhood, unsentimentally portraying aloof parents, oppressive teachers, and petty crime. The film marked Truffaut's passage from leading critic to trailblazing auteur of the French New Wave. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: two audio commentaries, one by cinema professor Brian Stonehill and the other by director François Truffaut's lifelong friend Robert Lachenay; rare audition footage of Jean-Pierre Léaud, Patrick Auffay, and Richard Kanayan; newsreel footage from the film's showing at Cannes; and more.
 
Friday, April 13
Friday Night Double Feature: M and Peeping Tom
 
These unsettling and widely influential thrillers give viewers a glimpse inside the psychopathic mind. Fritz Lang's expressionist touchstone M (1931) revolves around the Berlin manhunt for a murderer of children (Peter Lorre), in the process offering an analysis of the man's tortured psyche. In Peeping Tom (1960), a controversial film that nearly ended his career but is now regarded as a masterpiece, Michael Powell offers a Freudian portrait of a London serial killer (Carl Boehm), a cameraman with a predilection for recording the terror of his victims.

Monday, April 16
In Search of Ozu
 
In this original documentary, filmmaker Daniel Raim delves into Yasujiro Ozu's remarkable late work, in which the master made the leap from black and white to color. In his stirring tribute to the great filmmaker, Raim examines Ozu's life and work through archival treasures such as his diary and the red teakettle from the family drama Equinox Flower (1958); sits down with Ozu's nephew and the producer of the director's gently elegiac final film, An Autumn Afternoon (1962); and interweaves many scenes and images from the vibrant and humane films with which the director capped his career. Alongside the documentary, we present five of Ozu's color films, including Equinox Flower, Floating Weeds (1959), Late Autumn (1960), The End of Summer (1961), and An Autumn Afternoon (1962). 
 
Tuesday, April 17
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Casus belli* and Weekend
 
Two critiques of consumerism that make dazzling use of tracking shots. In Greek filmmaker Yorgos Zois's sinuous debut short, Casus belli (2010), an apparently continuous dolly shot observes different queues of people, from the supermarket checkout line to the wait at the betting-agency counter-and back again-wryly revealing the social divisions among those standing in place. Jean-Luc Godard's acid comedy Weekend (1967), in which a bourgeois couple set out to secure an inheritance from a dying relative, opens with a famous seven-minute-long shot of a massive traffic pileup, setting the tone for the entropic satire to follow.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, April 18
The Hero: Edition #911
 
In this psychologically rich character study, written and directed by Satyajit Ray, Bengali film star Uttam Kumar draws on his real-world celebrity to play Arindam Mukherjee, a matinee idol on the brink of his first flop. When Mukherjee boards an overnight train to Delhi to accept an award, a journalist (Sharmila Tagore) approaches him seeking an exclusive interview, which initiates a conversation that sends the actor reeling down a path of self-examination. Seamlessly integrating rueful flashbacks and surreal dream sequences with the quietly revelatory stories of the train's other passengers, The Hero is a graceful meditation on art, fame, and regret from one of world cinema's most keenly perceptive filmmakers. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a program featuring an interview from 2008 with actor Sharmila Tagore, and a program featuring film scholar Meheli Sen.
 
Friday, April 20
Friday Night Double Feature: Babette's Feast and The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover

Food represents the highest of arts and the basest of cruelties in this cinematic banquet. Gabriel Axel's Oscar-winning Babette's Feast, adapted from a short story by Isak Dinesen, tells the moving story of a French housekeeper with a mysterious past who brings quiet revolution in the form of one exquisite meal to a circle of starkly pious villagers in late-nineteenth-century Denmark. It's paired with an outrageously decadent masterpiece from Peter Greenaway, who stages a modern Jacobean revenge tragedy in a lavish restaurant, where a brutal gangster (Michael Gambon) holds court while his wife (Helen Mirren) sneaks away to her paramour. With vivid cinematography by Sacha Vierny and a hypnotic Michael Nyman score, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover culminates in a memorably gruesome feast.
 
Monday, April 23
Observations on Film Art No. 18: Staging and Performance in Ivan the Terrible, Part II

Sergei Eisenstein's final film, a two-part biopic of the notorious Tsar Ivan IV, is one of the revolutionary director's boldest experiments in film form, frequently departing from the codes of cinematic realism. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at how great filmmakers use cinematic devices and techniques, scholar David Bordwell examines Eisenstein's concept of "expressive movement," and shows how the director uses it to stage elaborate set pieces that incorporate the languages of painting and dance.
 
Tuesday, April 24
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Ghost Trip and Kings of the Road

These spare, existential road movies take in vast landscapes in stunning black and white. Bill Morrison's eerie Ghost Trip, a rare "fiction" film from an artist best known for his use of archival material, follows a mysterious driver on an American odyssey from coast to coast, passing through deserts, casinos, and graveyards along the way. Then, the capstone of Wim Wenders's Road Trilogy accompanies a film projector repairman and a depressed psychologist as they roam aimlessly from one movie theater to another across a melancholy Germany still haunted by war.
 
Wednesday, April 25
An Actor's Revenge: Edition #912

A uniquely prolific and chameleonic figure of world cinema, Kon Ichikawa delivered a burst of stylistic bravado with this intricate tale of betrayal and retribution. Set in the cloistered world of nineteenth-century kabuki theater, the film charts a female impersonator's attempts to avenge the deaths of his parents, who were driven to insanity and suicide by a trio of corrupt men. Ichikawa takes the conventions of melodrama and turns them on their head, bringing the hero's fractured psyche to life in boldly experimental widescreen compositions infused with kaleidoscopic color, pop-art influences, and meticulous choreography. Anchored by a magnificently androgynous performance by Kazuo Hasegawa, reprising a role he had played on-screen three decades earlier, An Actor's Revenge is an eye-popping examination of how the illusions of art intersect with life. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: A rare 1999 Directors Guild of Japan interview with director Kon Ichikawa, conducted by film critic Yuki Mori; and an interview with critic, filmmaker, and festival programmer Tony Rayns.
 
Thursday, April 26
Adventures in Moviegoing with Adam Gopnik

This month's guest curator, author and longtime New Yorker contributor Adam Gopnik, is a writer of omnivorous interests. For his selection of favorite films, he handpicked gems such as Jacques Demy's The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and Jean Cocteau's Orpheus, and then sat down with Antonio Monda, artistic director of the Rome Film Festival, to discuss a lifetime of moviegoing. From watching European cinema on television with his family, to seeing Singin' in the Rain during his adolescence in Paris, to his first date with the woman he would go on to marry (they saw Jean Vigo's achingly romantic L'Atalante), Gopnik chronicles his infatuation with cinema, a medium whose storytelling methods he often seeks to emulate in his own writing.
 
Friday, April 27
Friday Night Double Feature: Tokyo Drifter and The Long Good Friday

This gangster-movie double bill finds two career criminals attempting to go straight, only to get sucked back into the underworld. In Tokyo Drifter (1966),Seijun Suzuki's delirious pop-art riff on the yakuza genre, reformed hit man Tetsu gets called back from retirement to do battle with a rival gang, resulting in an onslaught of giddily stylized action. Then, a magnetic Bob Hoskins stars in John Mackenzie's The Long Good Friday (1980) as a vicious London mob boss whose best-laid plans to cross over into legitimate business get blown to smithereens over the course of one agonizing, bloody day.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
April 1
In a Lonely Place, Nicholas Ray, 1950
 
April 3
Monkey Love Experiments, Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson, 2014
 
April 4
Metropolitan, Whit Stillman, 1990
 
April 9
The Summer of Flying Fish, Marcela Said, 2013
 
April 17
Casus belli, Yorgos Zois, 2010
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE
For more information on FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel,

  

February 10, 2018

Good Weather To See NYC on Cole's "5th & Park" Walking Tour

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We've got ideal weather for my film and fiction walking tour of beautiful Carnegie Hill! A visit inside Central Park is on the list. 

There is much great culture to savor in Carnegie Hill, one of the country's oldest, and most architecturally rich neighborhoods. The tour combines Central Park, Museum Mile, lush mansions, celebrity homes, and countless filming locations — not to mention the chance of seeing a celebrity on the tour! Stranger things have happened on the rewarding streets of Carnegie Hill. 

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