10 posts categorized "Criterion"

November 30, 2017

Ask Jim Jarmusch a Question!

 
Ask Jim Jarmusch
 
Criterion's popular Q&A series with director Jim Jarmusch is back!
A special edition of Jarmusch's Dead Man is currently in the works,
will feature a new 4K restoration and is slated to be released in 2018.
 

The Criterion Collection is currently working on the special edition of Jarmusch's Dead Man, which will feature a new 4K restoration and is slated to be released in 2018, and is wondering if fans have any questions that they would like answered about the film.
 
Criterion will be accepting all of your questions from fans from now until December 8 and sending the most thoughtful and creative ones to Jim. Though they cannot guarantee that all will be answered on the release, feel free to ask as many as you like. Personal requests will not be answered.
 
Now ask away! Just make sure to include your full name, city, state, and country of residence with your questions.

November 29, 2017

DECEMBER PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
Includes Godzilla and fourteen other kaiju classics,
Aki Kaurismäki's Le Havre, and Nagisa Oshima's Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence!

Friday, December 1
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World*: Criterion Collection Edition #692

Stanley Kramer followed his harrowing Oscar winner Judgment at Nuremberg with the most grandly harebrained movie ever made, a pileup of slapstick and borscht-belt-y one-liners about a group of strangers fighting tooth and nail over buried treasure. Performed by a nonpareil cast, including Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Ethel Merman, Mickey Rooney, Spencer Tracy, Jonathan Winters, and a boatload of other playing-to-the-rafters comedy legends, Kramer's wildly uncharacteristic film is an exhilarating epic of tomfoolery. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary featuring It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World aficionados Mark Evanier, Michael Schlesinger, and Paul Scrabo; a documentary on the film's visual and sound effects, featuring interviews with visual-effects specialist Craig Barron and sound designer Ben Burtt; an excerpt from a 1974 talk show hosted by director Stanley Kramer and featuring Mad World actors Sid Caesar, Buddy Hackett, and Jonathan Winters; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, December 1
Friday Night Double Feature: Dodsworth and David Golder

Private woes take their toll on two successful self-made businessmen in this pair of domestic dramas from the 1930s. In William Wyler's Oscar-winning adaptation of Sinclair Lewis's Dodsworth (1936), Walter Huston stars as a Midwestern auto magnate who retires and embarks on a European voyage with his wannabe-chic wife, only to find that the two of them are growing further and further apart. In Julien Duviver's first sound film, the moody melodrama David Golder (1931), Harry Baur plays a ruthless banker grappling with business and family troubles.
 
Monday, December 4
A Night to Remember: Criterion Collection Edition #7

On April 14, 1912, just before midnight, the "unsinkable" Titanic struck an iceberg, plunging to the bottom of the sea and taking with it more than 1,500 of its 2,200 passengers. In his unforgettable render­ing of Walter Lord's book, British director Roy Ward Baker depicts with sensitivity, awe, and a fine sense of tragedy the ship's last hours. Featuring remarkably restrained performances, A Night to Remember (1958) is cinema's subtlest and best dramatization of this monumental twentieth-century catastrophe. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Don Lynch and Ken Marschall, author and illustrator of "Titanic": An Illustrated History; The Making of "A Night to Remember"(1993), a sixty-minute documentary featuring producer William MacQuitty's rare behind-the-scenes footage; an archival interview with Titanic survivor Eva Hart; and more.
 
Monday, December 4
Masterclass: Kenneth Turan and Marcel Ophuls on Disagreeable Truths

Marcel Ophuls talks to Los Angeles Times critic Kenneth Turan at UCLA about why and how he moved from making commercial feature films to chronicling occupied Europe and the Holocaust in epic documentaries like The Sorrow and the Pity and The Memory of Justice. Along the way, he also opens up about everything from his interview techniques and his experience as a second-generation auteur (the son of Max) to his thoughts on assessing guilt and responsibility for genocide and war crimes. Previous entries in our Masterclass series include conversations between Kirsten Johnson and Michael Moore and Alex Ross Perry and Robert Greene.
 
Tuesday, December 5
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Above and Cameraperson

With a keen eye for landscape and character, Kirsten Johnson's work documents political turmoil throughout the globe, calling into question the ethical stakes of nonfiction filmmaking. In The Above (2015), a mysterious surveillance blimp with unknown capabilities hovers above Kabul as the Afghans below go about their daily lives. In her breakthrough feature, Cameraperson (2016), she assembles footage captured throughout her twenty-five-year career, weaving together intimate moments from her private life with haunting images from her journeys abroad as a documentary cinematographer.
 
Wednesday, December 6
Le Havre: Criterion Collection Edition #619

With Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki returning to theaters this winter with his latest, The Other Side of Hope, we're revisiting his acclaimed previous film, which initiated his ongoing exploration of global migration and displacement. In this warmhearted comic yarn, fate throws a young African refugee into the path of a kindly old bohemian who shines shoes for a living in a French harbor city. A political fairy tale that exists somewhere between the reality of contemporary France and the classic French cinema of the past, Le Havre (2011) is a charming, deadpan delight and one of the director's finest films. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an interview with actor André Wilms; footage from the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, including a press conference and a French television interview with cast and crew; and more.
 
Thursday, December 7
Laughter First!: Harold Lloyd's Glasses Character Turns 100

Celebrate the centennial of Harold Lloyd's "Glasses Character" - the resourceful go-getter who always got the girl - with Kevin Brownlow and David Gill's lucid and entertaining documentary Harold Lloyd: The Third Genius. Crisply narrated by Lindsay Anderson, the film traces the performer's development all the way back to his early dramatic days and through his slapstick experiments, until he puts on horn-rimmed glasses and invents the figure who would go on to define his career. Brownlow and Gill pay exuberant tribute to the great silent clown, who was as wildly innovative as Buster Keaton and as skilled with sentiment as Chaplin, but had a resilience of his own that fit America's roaring twenties better than any other screen personality. The Third Genius streams alongside a selection of Lloyd's films: Safety Last! (1923), Girl Shy (1924), The Freshman (1925), The Kid Brother(1927), and Speedy (1928).
 
Friday, December 8
Friday Night Double Feature: The Stunt Man and 

Film sets become hazy frontiers between illusion and reality in these dizzying movies about movies. Richard Rush's Escher-like vortex The Stunt Man (1980) features Peter O'Toole at his most virtuosic, as a megalomaniacal director who manipulates a veteran on the run from the law into serving as a stuntman. Federico Fellini's kaleidoscopic  (1963) - perhaps the most gloriously expansive vision of itself the cinema has ever produced - weaves together the dreams, memories, and fantasies of a director (Marcello Mastroianni) whose latest project is collapsing around him.
 
Friday, December 8
Godzilla and Beyond*

This month, we're offering you the chance to go on a veritable viewing rampage, with this massive collection of fourteen kaiju classics. Running from Ishiro Honda's original Godzilla(1954) to the director's sci-fi drama Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975), these spectacular Toho productions track the King of the Monsters and a number of his fellow mutants as they evolved over the course of two decades, reflecting all the while many of the anxieties of a postwar world.  
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Saturday, December 9
Split Screen Season Nine

Two decades after it premiered on IFC, the pioneering television series Split Screen has a streaming home on the Channel. In this priceless time capsule, host John Pierson takes viewers on an irreverent trip through filmmaking communities and movie-loving culture at the turn of the millennium. This month, we present the show's penultimate season, which features appearances by Kevin Smith and Ross McElwee, and a hilarious segment in which Christopher Walken heads to the kitchen as the host of his own cooking show.
 
Monday, December 11
The Leopard: Criterion Collection Edition #235

An epic on the grandest possible scale, Luchino Visconti's 1963 masterpiece recreates the tumultuous years of Italy's Risorgimento - when the aristocracy lost its grip and the middle classes rose and formed a unified, democratic Italy. Burt Lancaster stars as the aging prince watching his culture and fortune wane in the face of a new generation, represented by his upstart nephew (Alain Delon) and his beautiful fiancée (Claudia Cardinale). Awarded the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, this lavish adaptation of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa's novel is presented in two distinct incarnations: Visconti's original Italian version and the alternate English-language version. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by film scholar Peter Cowie; an hour-long documentary featuring interviews with Claudia Cardinale, screenwriter Suso Ceccho D'Amico, Rotunno, filmmaker Sydney Pollack, and many others; and more.
 
Tuesday, December 12
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Return to Glennascaul* and The Third Man

Orson Welles brings his incomparable charisma to two dark gems. In Hilton Edwards's short Return to Glennascaul (1951), the actor stars as himself driving through the Irish countryside, where he picks up a man with car trouble and a chilling ghost story to tell; in Carol Reed's shadow-drenched noir masterpiece The Third Man (1949), he delivers one of his most iconic performances as the enigmatic Harry Lime, whose sudden death draws a childhood chum into a perilous journey through postwar Vienna.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, December 13
Phoenix*: Criterion Collection Edition #809

Christian Petzold's evocative 2014 drama, set in rubble-strewn Berlin in 1945, is like no other film about post-World War II Jewish-German identity. After surviving Auschwitz, a former cabaret singer (Nina Hoss) has her disfigured face reconstructed and returns to her war-ravaged hometown to seek out her gentile husband, who may or may not have betrayed her to the Nazis. Without recognizing her, he enlists her to play his wife in a bizarre hall-of-shattered-mirrors story that is as richly metaphorical as it is preposterously engrossing. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a new introduction by critic Imogen Sara Smith; a conversation between director Christian Petzold and actor Nina Hoss; The Making of "Phoenix," a 2014 documentary featuring interviews with Petzold, Hoss, actors Nina Kunzendorf and Ronald Zehrfeld, and production designer K. D. Gruber; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, December 14
I Am Curious: Criterion Collection Edition #179

Seized by customs upon entry to the United States, subject of a heated court battle, and banned in cities across the United States, Vilgot Sjöman's I Am Curious - Yellow is one of the most controversial films of all time. This landmark document of Swedish society during the sexual revolution tells the story of a searching and rebellious young woman, and her personal quest to understand the social and political conditions in 1960s Sweden, as well as her bold exploration of her own sexual identity. In celebration of its fiftieth anniversary, I Am Curious - Yellow is presented here with its companion piece I Am Curious - Blue, a parallel film featuring the same characters and in which the lines between documentary and fiction are even further blurred. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: excerpts from director Vilgot Sjöman's Self Portrait 92, a documentary made for Swedish television; a video introduction by the director; a selected scene audio commentary by Sjöman; and more.
 
Friday, December 15
Friday Night Double Feature: Fitzcarraldo and Burden of Dreams

The limits of human endurance are put to the test in German iconoclast Werner Herzog's 1982 Fitzcarraldo, an epic portrait of a rubber baron's attempts to build an opera house in the Peruvian jungle. The film was the result of a notoriously nightmarish five-year production, glimpses of which are captured in Les Blank's Burden of Dreams, an unsparing behind-the-scenes look at Herzog's quest to bring his impossible vision to the screen.
 
Monday, December 18
Creative Marriages: Juzo Itami and Nobuko Miyamoto

Juzo Itami became the most talked-about Japanese director of the eighties and nineties when he and his wife, actor Nobuko Miyamoto, created a string of audacious movies centered on independent women who were smart and passionate about their work. In the latest installment of Creative Marriages, we're celebrating their partnership in both life and cinema. Watch their 1985 international breakthrough, Tampopo, a mouth-watering "ramen western" starring Miyamoto as a single mother who becomes a first-class noodle chef with a lot of help from her friends. Also on view is the seriocomic social thriller A Taxing Woman (1987), a box-office smash that staged a frontal attack on the contemporary obsession with making money. You can also check out our previous Creative Marriages programs highlighting Federico Fellini and Giulietta Masina, Roger Vadim and Brigitte Bardot, and Jean Cocteau and Jean Marais.
 
Tuesday, December 19
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Time Piece and Tom Jones

Two masters deliver flights of playful cinematic style with their own witty sensibilities. In the Oscar-winning 1963 Tom Jones, British New Wave pioneer Tony Richardson updates Henry Fielding's picaresque eighteenth-century novel with an ebullient, fourth-wall-breaking irreverence. And in the Oscar-nominated 1965 short Time Piece, which features a parody of one of the most memorable scenes in Tom Jones, legendary puppeteer Jim Henson delivers a fast-paced, rhythmically edited tale of a young man desperately trying to escape the passage of time.
 
Wednesday, December 20
Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence*: Criterion Collection Edition #535

In this captivating, skewed World War II drama from Nagisa Oshima, David Bowie regally embodies a British officer interned by the Japanese as a POW. Rock star Ryuichi Sakamoto (who also composed this film's hypnotic score) plays the camp commander, obsessed with the mysterious blond major, while Tom Conti is a British lieutenant colonel who tries to bridge the emotional and language divides between captor and prisoner. Also featuring actor-director Takeshi Kitano in his first dramatic role, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence(1983) is a multilayered, brutal, at times erotic tale of culture clash, and one of Oshima's greatest successes. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: The Oshima Gang, a 1983 making-of featurette; video interviews with producer Jeremy Thomas, screenwriter Paul Mayersberg, actor Tom Conti, and actor-composer Ryuichi Sakamoto; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, December 21
Observations on Film Art No. 14: Girl Shy - Harold Lloyd Meets Classical Hollywood

The silent comedy might be most famous today for its one-off gags and chases, but by the twenties the form had begun to tell increasingly sophisticated feature-length stories, thanks to such pioneering figures as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art - a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at great filmmakers' use of cinematic devices and traditions - scholar David Bordwell unpacks the narrative strategies at play in Lloyd's comedy of embarrassment Girl Shy(1924), illuminating the film's implementation of such classical Hollywood devices as psychological characterization and repeated motifs.
 
Friday, December 22
Friday Night Double Feature: Chéri and Journey to Italy

The work of the French author Colette, celebrated for its evocation of affairs of the heart during the belle epoque, inspired these two tales of precarious romance. Stephen Frears's seductive period piece Chéri (2009), an adaptation of Colette's 1920 novel of the same name, tells the story of the years-long relationship between a courtesan (Michelle Pfeiffer) and her peer's decadent and impressionable son (Rupert Friend). And Robert Rossellini's modernist drama Journey to Italy (1954), loosely based on Colette's Duo (1934), observes the mounting tensions between a married British couple (Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders) during a trip to the Neapolitan countryside.
 
Tuesday, December 26
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Light Is Calling and My Winnipeg

These two films, both beautifully tactile experiments with film form, make brilliant use of found footage. In his eight-minute film Light Is Calling (2004), Bill Morrison cedes the frame to a scene from a 1926 silent film as it appears on a decomposing film reel, in the process crafting a haunting meditation on the ravages of time; in his beguiling "docu-fantasia" My Winnipeg (2007), Guy Maddin mixes archival footage with his own expressionistic black-and-white material to evoke the weird and wonderful world of his hometown.
 
Friday, December 29
Friday Night Double Feature: The Apartment and Brief Encounter

With 2018 just around the corner, take a look back at a Hollywood classic whose climax takes place on New Year's Eve, along with the movie that inspired it. David Lean reached his first great peak with Brief Encounter (1945), starring Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard as refined middle-class lovers who fail to consummate their affair in a borrowed flat when the owner unexpectedly barges in on them. Billy Wilder loved the film, but wondered-who's the guy who owns the apartment? The result: Wilder's five-time Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), which casts Jack Lemmon as the shlemiel who gives his key to his superiors for their trysts, and Shirley MacLaine as the elevator girl and executive's mistress he unexpectedly falls in love with.  
 
Friday, December 29
Weekend: Criterion Collection Edition #635

This scathing satire from Jean-Luc Godard, which celebrates its fiftieth anniversary this week, is one of cinema's great anarchic works. Determined to collect an inheritance from a dying relative, a bourgeois couple travel across the French countryside while civilization crashes and burns around them. Featuring a justly famous sequence in which the camera tracks along a seemingly endless traffic jam, and rich with historical and literary references, Weekend is a surreally funny and disturbing call for revolution, a depiction of society reverting to savagery, and - according to the credits - the end of cinema itself. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a video essay by writer and filmmaker Kent Jones; archival interviews with actors Mireille Darc and Jean Yanne, cinematographer Raoul Coutard, and assistant director Claude Miller; and more.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

December 1
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Stanley Kramer, 1963
Happy Together, Wong Kar-wai, 1997
The World of Jacques Demy, Agnes Varda, 1995
 
December 8
Godzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1954
Godzilla: King of the Monsters!, Ishiro Honda and Terry O. Morse, 1956
Godzilla Raids Again, Motoyoshi Oda, 1955
Rodan, Ishiro Honda, 1956
Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster, Ishiro Honda, 1964
Mothra vs. Godzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1964
Invasion of Astro-Monster, Ishiro Honda, 1965
The War of the Gargantuas, Ishiro Honda, 1966
Son of Godzilla, Jun Fukuda, 1967
Destroy All Monsters, Ishiro Honda, 1968
All Monsters Attack, Ishiro Honda, 1969
Godzilla vs. Megalon, Jun Fukuda, 1973
Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla, Jun Fukuda, 1974
Terror of Mechagodzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1975
 
December 12
Return to Glennascaul, Hilton Edwards, 1951
 
December 13
Phoenix, Christian Petzold, 2014

December 15
Woman in Witness Protection, Juzo Itami, 1997
A Quiet Life, Juzo Itami, 1995
Tales of a Golden Geisha, Juzo Itami, 1990
The Gentle Art of Japanese Extortion, Juzo Itami, 1992
The Funeral, Juzo Itami, 1984
Rubber Band Pistol, Juzo Itami, 1962
The Last Dance, Juzo Itami, 1995

December 20
Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, Nagisa Oshima, 1983
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ABOUT THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium-from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to FilmStruck, the streaming service developed in collaboration with Turner Classic Movies - Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer's appreciation of the art of film.
 
For more information on FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel,
 

November 02, 2017

NOVEMBER PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
Includes Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins,
four films by Shohei Imamura, and Luis Buñuel's Belle de jour!
 
Wednesday, November 1
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold*: Criterion Collection Edition #452
The best-selling novel by John le Carré, about a Cold War spy on one final dangerous mission in East Germany, is transmuted by director Martin Ritt into a film every bit as precise and ruthless as the book. Richard Burton is superb as Alec Leamas, whose relationship with the beautiful librarian Nan, played by Claire Bloom, puts his assignment in jeopardy. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a hard-edged and tragic thriller, suffused with the political and social consciousness that defined Ritt's career.SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an exclusive, wide-ranging interview with le Carré; a selected-scene commentary featuring director of photography Oswald Morris; an audio conversation from 1985 between director Martin Ritt and film historian Patrick McGilligan; and a trailer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, November 2
Masterclass: Alex Ross Perry and Robert Greene on Big Ideas and Small Budgets
Known for his piercingly intelligent, stylistically ambitious explorations of alienation and misanthropy, independent filmmaker Alex Ross Perry has been busy at work on two projects: the soon-to-be-released Golden Exits and a live-action take on Winnie-the-Pooh. For our third Masterclass, his frequent collaborator Robert Greene, the director of the acclaimed narrative-documentary hybrids Kate Plays Christine and Actress, gets him to open up about how he brings his acerbic ideas to the big screen on a shoestring budget. Watch video of the complete event, hosted by the Ragtag Cinema in Columbia, Missouri, and catch up on Perry's first three features: Impolex*, The Color Wheel*, and Listen Up Philip*.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, November 3
Friday Night Double Feature: That Hamilton Woman and Anna Karenina
The luminous Vivien Leigh takes the lead in these two lavishly mounted period dramas. In Alexander Korda's 1941 That Hamilton Woman - reportedly Winston Churchill's favorite movie - she is transported back to the Napoleonic Wars, injecting glamour and intrigue into the story of an ambassador's wife who has a scandalous affair with a British Royal Navy officer (played by Leigh's real-life husband, Laurence Olivier). And in Julien Duvivier's 1948 adaptation of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, she embodies the tragic dimensions of the iconic titular heroine, a married woman who falls into a fateful romance with a count.
 
Monday, November 6
Still Walking*: Criterion Collection Edition #554
Contemporary Japanese master Hirokazu Kore-eda pays tribute to his late mother in this deeply personal film, which depicts one day in the life of a family gathered for a commemorative ritual whose nature only gradually becomes clear. Rather than focus on big dramatic moments, Kore-eda relies on simple gestures and domestic routines (especially cooking) to evoke his characters' deep regrets and daily joys. Featuring vivid, heartrending performances and a gentle naturalism that harks back to the director's earlier, documentary work, Still Walking is an extraordinary portrayal of the ties that bind us. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: interviews with Kore-eda and director of photography Yutaka Yamazaki; a documentary on the making of the film, featuring on-set footage; and a trailer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, November 7
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Washingtonia* and Dogtooth
With Yorgos Lanthimos's The Killing of a Sacred Deer now in theaters, revisit the eccentric, award-winning breakthrough that catapulted him to the forefront of contemporary Greek cinema. In 2009's Dogtooth, the director penetrates the twisted world of three adults who have been held in captivity their entire lives by their manipulative parents. This brilliantly constructed provocation is preceded by another taste of the Greek Weird Wave, Konstantina Kotzamani's Washingtonia, an expressionistic short that evokes the sweltering heat of a summer in Athens.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, November 8
Belle de jour: Criterion Collection Edition #593
Catherine Deneuve's porcelain perfection hides a cracked interior in one of the actress's most iconic roles: Séverine, a Paris housewife who begins secretly spending her afternoon hours working in a bordello. This surreal and erotic late-sixties daydream from provocateur for the ages Luis Buñuel is an examination of desire and fetishistic pleasure (its characters' and its viewers'), as well as a gently absurdist take on social mores and class divisions. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary featuring Michael Wood, author of the BFI Film Classics book Belle de jour; a video piece featuring writer and sexual-politics activist Susie Bright and film scholar Linda Williams; an interview with screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière; a segment from the French television program Cinéma, featuring interviews with Carrière and Deneuve; and original and rerelease trailers.
 
Friday, November 10
Friday Night Double Feature: Chevalier and Attenberg
One of the most exciting voices to emerge from contemporary Greek cinema's recent renaissance, Athina Rachel Tsangari is a favorite on the Criterion Channel, having been the first subject profiled in our exclusive series Meet the Filmmakers. This program highlights two of her features: Chevalier, a dryly farcical comedy in which a sextet of chest-puffing men decide to submit to an increasingly absurd series of competitions at sea to determine who is "the best in general," and Attenberg, a look at the strangeness of the human species through the eyes of a misanthropic young woman living in a small industrial town.
 
Monday, November 13
Everlasting Moments*: Criterion Collection Edition #520
Swedish master Jan Troell, director of the beloved classics The Emigrants and The New Land, illuminates the heartrending story of a woman liberated by art at the beginning of the twentieth century. Though poor and abused by her alcoholic husband, Maria Larsson (Maria Heiskanen, in a beautifully nuanced portrayal) finds an outlet in photography, which opens up her world for the first time. With a burnished bronze tint that evokes faded photographs, and a broad empathetic palette, Everlasting Moments - based on a true story - is a miraculous tribute to the power of image making. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: Troell Behind the Camera, a short documentary made during production; The True Story of Maria Larsson, a collection of photographs by Larsson, with narration by writer Agneta Ulfsäter-Troell; Troell's Magic Mirror, an hour-long documentary on the director's career; and a trailer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, November 14
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Pickle* and Gates of Heaven
Do all dogs go to heaven? Two documentary filmmakers explore mortality and mourning through the experiences of pet owners. In Pickle, Amy Nicholson profiles a couple of extreme animal lovers, interviewing them about the menagerie they've cared for and buried over the years, including paraplegic possums, emaciated cats, and morbidly obese chickens. Errol Morris's debut feature, Gates of Heaven, immerses viewers in the community surrounding two pet cemeteries in Napa Valley, California, blending sincerity and satire to spin its quirky subject into a surprisingly expansive study of human nature.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, November 14
Desert Hearts*: Criterion Collection Edition #902
Donna Deitch's swooning and sensual first narrative feature was groundbreaking upon its release in 1985: a love story about two women, made entirely independently, on a shoestring budget, by a woman. In this 1959-set film, adapted from a beloved novel by Jane Rule, a straitlaced East Coast professor arrives in Reno to file for divorce but winds up catching the eye of a free-spirited young woman, touching off a slow seduction that unfolds against a breathtaking desert landscape. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary from 2007 featuring director Donna Deitch; a conversation between Deitch and actor Jane Lynch; interviews with actors Helen Shaver and Patricia Charbonneau; a new program featuring Deitch, director of photography Elswit, and production designer Jeannine Oppewall; and an excerpt from Fiction and Other Truths: A Film About Jane Rule, a 1994 documentary about the author of Desert of the Heart, the 1964 novel on which the film is based.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, November 15
Stalker: Criterion Collection Edition #888
A religious allegory, a reflection of contemporaneous political anxieties, and a meditation on film itself, Andrei Tarkovsky's final Soviet feature takes a metaphys­ical journey through an enigmatic postapocalyptic landscape, where a hired guide leads a writer and a professor into a restricted disaster site known as the Zone. There the three men eventually zero in on the Room, a place rumored to fulfill one's most deeply held desires. Adapting a science-fiction novel by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky, Tarkovsky created an immersive world with a wealth of material detail and a sense of organic atmosphere, enveloping the viewer in a multitude of possible meanings. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an interview with Geoff Dyer, author of Zona: A Book About a Film About a Journey to a Room, and interviews from 2002 with cinematographer Alexander Knyazhinsky, set designer Rashit Safiullin, and composer Eduard Artemyev.
 
Thursday, November 16
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me*: Criterion Collection Edition #898
In the town of Twin Peaks, everybody has their secrets - but no one more than Laura Palmer. In this prequel to his groundbreaking 1990s series (which returned to television this year to rapturous reviews), David Lynch resurrects the teenager found wrapped in plastic at the beginning of the show, following her through the last week of her life and teasing out the enigmas that surround her murder. Homecoming queen by day and drug-addicted thrill seeker by night, Laura leads a double life that pulls her deeper and deeper into horror as she pieces together the identity of the assailant who has been terrorizing her for years. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: The Missing Pieces, ninety minutes of deleted and alternate takes from the film, assembled by Lynch; an interview from 2014 by Lynch with actors Sheryl Lee, Ray Wise, and Grace Zabriskie; interviews with Lee and composer Angelo Badalamenti; and trailers.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, November 17
Friday Night Double Feature: Police, Adjective* and Insomnia
Moral ambiguities abound in these unconventional detective stories from Romania and Norway. In Corneliu Porumboiu's low-key procedural Police, Adjective, a cop has a crisis of conscience as he struggles with an assignment to book a high-school kid for smoking pot. Reluctant to ruin the boy's life with a jail sentence, he starts to question the letter of the law, leading to an unforgettable climax in which a dictionary becomes the ultimate instrument of power. And in Erik Skjoldbjærg's Nordic thriller, a disgraced detective (Stellan Skarsgård, in one of his most magnetic performances) investigating the death of a teenage girl becomes uneasily complicit with her killer as the Arctic midnight sun erodes his sense of reality.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Monday, November 20
Babette's Feast: Criterion Collection Edition #665
One of the ultimate food films, this adaptation of a lovingly layered tale by Isak Dinesen shows what happens when a mysterious French housekeeper brings quiet revolution in the form of one exquisite meal to a circle of starkly pious villagers. Set in nineteenth-century Denmark, Gabriel Axel's Oscar-winning film combines earthiness and reverence in an indescribably moving depiction of sensual pleasure that goes to your head like fine champagne. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: interviews with Axel and actor Stéphane Audran; a 1995 documentary about Dinesen; a visual essay by filmmaker Michael Almereyda; an interview with sociologist Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson about the significance of cuisine in French culture; and a trailer.
 
Tuesday, November 21
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Vampire* and Nosferatu
The vampire as we know it is unimaginable without F. W. Murnau's groundbreaking horror film, an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula that brought the creature to the screen with the wildly expressive powers of German expressionism. Jean Painlevé, France's brilliant scientist of the surreal, spotted the kinship between this iconic monster and the Brazilian vampire bat. His short The Vampire, soundtracked by Duke Ellington, explores this nocturnal creature's feeding rituals, making for an unusually spooky entry in the filmmaker's series of imaginative wildlife portraits.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, November 22
Heart of a Dog*: Criterion Collection Edition #846
Multimedia artist Laurie Anderson meditates on death and other forms of absence in her first feature in thirty years. This haunting essay film seamlessly weaves together thoughts on Tibetan Buddhism, reincarnation, the modern surveillance state, and the artistic lives of dogs, with an elegy for the filmmaker's beloved rat terrier, Lolabelle, at its heart. Narrated by Anderson with her characteristic wry wit, and featuring a plaintive, free-form score by the filmmaker, the tender and provocative Heart of a Dog continues Anderson's four-and-a-half-decade career of imbuing the everyday with a sense of dreamlike wonder. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a conversation between Anderson and coproducer Jake Perlin; footage of Anderson's 2016 Concert for Dogs; deleted scenes; Lolabelle's video Christmas card; and a trailer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, November 23
Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins
The director of Moonlight, the exquisite coming-of-age drama that took home this year's best picture Oscar, recounts some of his own formative experiences as a cinephile in this month's episode of our guest programmer series Adventures in Moviegoing. In conversation with Criterion president Peter Becker, Jenkins talks about how he fell in love with the art of storytelling, his "rude awakening" at film school, and his experience programming at the Telluride Film Festival. To go alongside the interview, Jenkins has also curated a selection of personal favorites, an eclectic group of films that includes Krzysztof Kieślowski's Three Colors trilogy (1993-94), Lucrecia Martel's La Ciénega (2001), and a number of titles by indie trailblazer John Cassavetes.
 
Friday, November 24
Friday Night Double Feature: Permanent Vacation* and Smithereens
These idiosyncratic first features capture a hardscrabble New York at the dawn of the eighties, tagging along with protagonists who are struggling to find a foothold in the city that never sleeps. A drifter confronts his own state of estrangement, and a number of distinctive characters besides, in Jim Jarmusch's characteristically droll Permanent Vacation(1980); a striver tries in vain to make a name for herself in the punk scene in Susan Seidelman's blistering breakout Smithereens (1982).
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Monday, November 27
Observations on Film Art No. 13: Flashbacks in The Phantom Carriage

Illustrating that a story's telling often means as much as the tale itself, this month's episode of Observations on Film Art - a Channel-exclusive series in which film scholars David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, and Jeff Smith offer in-depth yet concise discussions of cinematic style - goes along for a twisty ride with Victor Sjöström's intricately structured The Phantom Carriage (1921). The touchstone of silent cinema presents a handful of extended flashbacks out of chronological sequence - a narrative design that, in Prof. Thompson's estimation, is key to establishing the dynamics between the film's characters and the strength of its themes of evil and salvation.
 
Tuesday, November 28
Tuesday's Short + Feature: In Paris Parks and Zazie dans le métro

Children take to the parks and streets of Paris in these urban symphonies, transforming the city into a landscape of playful chaos. Shirley Clarke's documentary In Paris Parks short observes the teeming life she finds in the recreational spots where city dwellers bring their children, uncovering the wonders of a seemingly mundane space. And Louis Malle's Zazie dans le métro brings Raymond Queneau's celebrated novel to the screen, spinning a brash ten-year-old's weekend visit to a Parisian relative into an anarchic comedy packed with stream-of-consciousness effects, visual gags, and editing tricks. 
 
Wednesday, November 29
Amarcord: Criterion Collection Edition #4
This Oscar-winning carnivalesque portrait of provincial Italy during the fascist period is among Federico Fellini's most personal films. Now revered as one of cinema's enduring treasures, it satirizes the director's youth and turns daily life into a circus of social rituals, adolescent desires, male fantasies, and political subterfuge, all set to Nino Rota's classic, nostalgia-tinged score. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by film scholars Peter Brunette and Frank Burke; American release trailer; a deleted scene; Fellini's Homecoming, a forty-five-minute documentary on the complicated relationship between the celebrated director, his hometown, and his past; an interview with star Magali Noël; archival audio interviews of Fellini and his friends and family, by critic Gideon Bachmann; and a restoration demonstration.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

November 1
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Martin Ritt, 1965
 
November 2
Impolex, Alex Ross Perry, 2009
The Color Wheel, Alex Ross Perry, 2011
Listen Up Philip, Alex Ross Perry, 2014
 
November 3
Utamaro and His Five Women, Kenji Mizoguchi, 1946
The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family, Yasujiro Ozu, 1941
Burden of Life, Heinosuke Gosho, 1935
Black Lizard, Umetsugu Inoue, 1962
Ronin-Gai, Masahiro Makino, 1957
 
November 6
Still Walking, Hirokazu Kore-eda, 2008
 
November 7
Washingtonia, Konstantina Kotzamani, 2014
 
November 10
Stolen Desire, Shohei Imamura, 1958
Intentions of Murder, Shohei Imamura, 1964
The Pornographers, Shohei Imamura, 1966
Profound Desire of the Gods, Shohei Imamura, 1968
 
November 13
Everlasting Moments, Jan Troell, 2008
 
November 14
Pickle, Amy Nicholson, 2016
Desert Hearts, Donna Deitch, 1986
 
November 16
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, David Lynch, 1992
 
November 17
Police, Adjective, Corneliu Porumboiu, 2009
Eva, Gustaf Molander, 1948
Scrubbers, Mai Zetterling, 1982
Girl with Green Eyes, Desmond Davis, 1964
 
November 21
The VampireJean Painlevé, 1945
 
November 22
Heart of a Dog, Laurie Anderson, 2015
 
November 24
Permanent Vacation, Jim Jarmusch, 1980
Bergman Island, Marie Nyreröd, 2006
The Challenge, Milton Rosmer and Luis Trenker, 1938
Fanfan la Tulipe, Christian Jacque, 1952
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE

ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. Other recent additions to the programming include MEET THE FILMMAKER: ATHINA RACHEL TSANGARI and ADVENTURES IN MOVIEGOING WITH BILL HADER.
 
ABOUT FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck is a new subscription on-demand service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary and classic art house, indie, foreign and cult films. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, FilmStruck will be the new exclusive streaming home for the critically acclaimed and award-winning Criterion Collection, including the Criterion Channel, a new premium service programmed and curated by the Criterion team.  FilmStruck is Turner's first domestic direct-to-consumer offering launched in November 2016.

ABOUT THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium-from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to FilmStruck, the streaming service developed in collaboration with Turner Classic Movies - Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer's appreciation of the art of film.

August 10, 2017

100 YEARS OF OLYMPIC FILMS — CRITERION

presents
 
100 YEARS OF
OLYMPIC FILMS
 
Deluxe Blu-ray and DVD collector's sets include 53 films
and a 216-page illustrated book, to be released December 5, 2017
 
Features landmark work by Kon Ichikawa, Bud Greenspan, Milos Forman,
Leni Reifenstahl, Claude Lelouch, Masahiro Shinoda and many more!
 
 
We are pleased to announce Criterion's upcoming release of 100 YEARS OF OLYMPIC FILMS. Spanning fifty-three movies and forty-one editions of the Olympic Summer and Winter Games, this one-of-a-kind collection assembles, for the first time, a century's worth of Olympic films - the culmination of a monumental, award-winning archival project encompassing dozens of new restorations by the International Olympic Committee.
 
These documentaries cast a cinematic eye on some of the most iconic moments in the history of modern sports, spotlighting athletes who embody the Olympic motto of "Faster, Higher, Stronger": Jesse Owens shattering sprinting world records on the track in 1936 Berlin, Jean Claude-Killy dominating the slopes of Grenoble in 1968, Joan Benoit breaking away to win the first-ever women's marathon on the streets of Los Angeles in 1984.
 
In addition to the work of Bud Greenspan, the man behind an impressive ten Olympic features, this stirring collective chronicle of triumph and defeat includes such landmarks of the documentary form as Leni Riefenstahl's Olympia and Kon Ichikawa's Tokyo Olympiad, along with lesser- known but captivating contributions by major directors like Claude Lelouch, Carlos Saura, and Milos Forman. It also serves as a fascinating window onto the formal development of cinema itself, as well as the technological progress that has enabled the viewer, over the years, to get ever closer to the action. Traversing continents and decades, and reflecting as well the social, cultural, and political changes that have shaped our recent history, this remarkable marathon of films offers nothing less than a panorama of a hundred years of human endeavor.
 
BLU-RAY AND DVD SPECIAL EDITION COLLECTOR'S SETS FEATURE
* 53 newly restored films from 41 editions of the Olympic Games, presented together for the first time 
* Landmark 4K restorations of OlympiaTokyo Olympiad, and Visions of Eight, among other titles
* New scores for the silent films, composed by Maud Nelissen, Donald Sosin, and Frido ter Beek
* A lavishly illustrated, 216-page, hardcover book, featuring notes on the films by cinema historian Peter Cowie; a foreword by Thomas Bach, President of the International Olympic Committee; a short history of the restoration project by restoration producer Adrian Wood; and hundreds of photographs from a century of Olympic Games
 
HIGHLIGHTS FROM A CENTURY OF OLYMPIC FILMS
 
Stockholm 1912
The Games of the V Olympiad Stockholm, 1912 (dir. Adrian Wood)
 
Berlin 1936
Olympia Part One: Festival of the Nations (dir. Leni Riefenstahl)
Olympia Part Two: Festival of Beauty (dir. Leni Riefenstahl)
 
Cortina d'Ampezzo 1956
White Vertigo (dir. Giorgio Ferroni)
 
Tokyo 1964
Tokyo Olympiad (dir. Kon Ichikawa)

Grenoble 1968
13 Days in France (dirs. Claude Lelouch, François Reichenbach)
 
Sapporo 1972
Sapporo Winter Olympics (dir. Masahiro Shinoda)
 
Munich 1972
Visions of Eight (dirs. Milos Forman, Kon Ichikawa, Claude Lelouch, Yuri Ozerov, Arthur Penn, Michael Pfleghar, John Schlesinger, Mai Zetterling)
 
Barcelona 1992
Marathon (dir. Carlos Saura)
 
 
32-BLU-RAY EDITION
SRP $399.95 PREBOOK 11/7/17 STREET 12/5/17
CAT. NO. CC2811BD ISBN 978-1-68143-361-5 UPC 7-15515-20451-4
 
43-DVD EDITION
SRP $399.95
PREBOOK 11/7/17 STREET 12/5/17
CAT. NO. CC2812DDVD ISBN 978-1-68143-362-2 UPC 7-15515-20461-3 

June 26, 2017

JULY PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

      
 
JULY PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Adventures in Moviegoing with Brad Bird, Yasujiro Ozu's Tokyo Story,
and Andrew Haigh's Weekend!
 
Saturday, July 1
Changing Faces

What does a face tell us even when it's disguised or disfigured? And what does it conceal? Guest curator Imogen Sara Smith, a critic and author of the book In Lonely Places: Film Noir Beyond the City, assembles a series of films that revolve around enigmatic faces transformed by masks, scars, and surgery, including Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face (1960) and Hiroshi Teshigahara's The Face of Another (1966).
 
Tuesday, July 4
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Premature* and Ten*

Come hitch a ride with Norwegian director Gunhild Enger and the late Iranian master Abbas Kiarostami in two films that take place entirely within moving cars. In Enger's 2012 short Premature, a pregnant Spanish woman has an agonizing encounter with her boyfriend's family upon arriving in Norway, while in the 2002 feature Ten, Kiarostami takes a boldly minimalist approach to the fissures within Iranian society, capturing ten conversations between a female driver and a series of passengers.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, July 5
Weekend*: Criterion Collection Edition #622

A casual hookup between two young men teeters on the cusp of something more in this bittersweet romance, the breakout film by British director Andrew Haigh (45 Years). Our edition includes interviews with Haigh and his cast and collaborators, footage from the film's shoot, and two of the director's early shorts.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Thursday, July 6
Grand Illusion: Criterion Collection Edition #1

"If I had only one film in the world to save, it would be Grand Illusion," said Orson Welles. No wonder it was our first DVD edition! Jean Gabin, Pierre Fresnay, and Erich von Stroheim star in Jean Renoir's masterpiece, a prison-escape film that sounds an elegiac note for the doomed nobility of Europe. We're commemorating the eightieth anniversary of this masterpiece - and the ongoing World War I centennial - with our edition, which includes video footage of Renoir discussing his experiences in combat.
 
Friday, July 7
Friday Night Double Feature: Breaker Morant and Mister Johnson

Australian director Bruce Beresford, celebrated for American hits like the Oscar-winning Driving Miss Daisy and Tender Mercies, broke through internationally with Breaker Morant (1980), the riveting drama of three Australian soldiers who are court-martialed and made scapegoats for the crimes of the British Empire during the Boer War. Ten years later, he again trained his eye on the human costs of colonialism in Mister Johnson, which adapts Joyce Cary's novel about a Nigerian villager who seeks to ingratiate himself with the British authorities in hopes of realizing his ambitions.
 
Tuesday, July 11
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Taris and Three Colors: Blue

In 1931's Taris, Jean Vigo uses every trick in his toolbox-including underwater photography, whiplash editing, and slowed and reversed motion-to capture the athletic prowess of a champion swimmer. We've paired this short with another film that makes evocative use of water: the mournful first entry in Krzysztof Kieślowski's Three Colors trilogy, in which a grief-stricken Juliette Binoche finds solace in a blue-lit swimming pool.
 
Wednesday, July 12
Senso: Criterion Collection Edition #556

Period melodrama doesn't get more operatic than this Luchino Visconti masterpiece from 1954, adapted from a novella by Italian author Camillo Boito. The film's lush Technicolor palette glistens anew in a celebrated restoration by The Film Foundation and the Cineteca di Bologna featured on our edition, which also includes The Wanton Countess, the rare English-language version of the film, and documentaries on the production and Visconti's work in opera.
 
Thursday, July 13
Tokyo Story: Criterion Collection Edition #217

Widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time, Yasujiro Ozu's 1953 family drama follows an aging couple as they pay a visit to their increasingly distracted adult children in the city, giving profound expression to the director's recurrent theme of intergenerational conflict. Supplements on our edition include I Lived, But . . ., a feature-length documentary about Ozu's life and career, as well as Talking with Ozu, a tribute to the master with reminiscences by filmmakers such as Lindsay Anderson, Hou Hsiao-hsien, and Wim Wenders.
 
Friday, July 14
Friday Night Double Feature: The Earrings of Madame de . . . and Elena and Her Men

Journey back to the belle epoque with two films that revolve around dazzling women in high society, both by master filmmakers: Max Ophuls's 1953 The Earrings of Madame de . . ., a romantic tragedy swept along by the director's famously fluid camera work, stars Danielle Darrieux as a general's wife who falls in love with a baron, while Jean Renoir's 1956 Elena and Her Men, a freewheeling farce shot in lavish Technicolor, stars Ingrid Bergman as a Polish princess whose allure ultimately steadies the French government.

Monday, July 17
Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff*

Jack Cardiff, who in 2001 became the first honorary Oscar recipient to win primarily for his work as a cinematographer, gets a close-up of his own in this 2010 documentary by Craig McCall. The film surveys a career that included collaborations with King Vidor, Alfred Hitchcock, and, most famously, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. We're showcasing two of the most stunningly vibrant Technicolor films he made with the Archers: the gripping convent drama Black Narcissus (1947) and the bewitching ballet fantasia The Red Shoes(1948).
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Tuesday, July 18
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Asparagus* and Eraserhead

Reuniting two movies that made a mark playing back-to-back on the midnight-movie circuit in the late seventies, this week's Short + Feature pairs off David Lynch's unnerving black-and-white family nightmare Eraserhead with Suzan Pitt's colorful animated short Asparagus, a psychosexual phantasmagoria that, like Lynch's film, goes all in on surrealist imagery.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, July 19
Cameraperson*: Criterion Collection Edition #853

Deftly weaving together outtake footage she shot while on assignment for other films, veteran documentary cinematographer Kirsten Johnson's lauded directorial debut takes viewers all over the world, from a hospital in Nigeria to a farm in Bosnia to a boxing match in Brooklyn, as it reflects on the nature of nonfiction filmmaking and a life spent on the road. Our complete edition features a program on the editing of the film, interviews with Johnson and her collaborators, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Thursday, July 20
The Thin Blue Line: Criterion Collection Edition #753

A watershed work in the history of the documentary form, and a stylistically influential film featuring staged reenactments and a swirling score by Philip Glass, Errol Morris's 1988 true-crime masterpiece The Thin Blue Line closely examines the case of a man on death row for the murder of a police officer - a crime he may not have committed. New interviews with Morris and The Act of Killing director Joshua Oppenheimer are among the supplements on our director-approved edition.
 
Friday, July 21
Friday Night Double Feature: The Rocking Horse Winner* and Oliver Twist

The young British actor John Howard Davies headlines two classic literary adaptations about the fickle fortunes of boyhood: Anthony Pelissier's 1949 The Rocking Horse Winner, a little-known gem based on a short story by D. H. Lawrence, tells the tale of a child who discovers a magical talent for predicting the outcomes of horse races; David Lean's 1948 masterpiece Oliver Twist, based on the Dickens novel, tags along with the titular orphan as he lands in a den of thieves in the notorious underworld of nineteenth-century London.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Saturday, July 22
Split Screen Season 6

Two decades after it premiered on IFC, the pioneering television series Split Screen has a streaming home on the Channel, with batches of episodes from the show's four-year run going up every month. A priceless time capsule of independent American cinema at the turn of the millennium, the series features producer and host John Pierson guiding viewers across the country for an irreverent look at filmmaking communities and movie-loving culture. This month's newly available installments include appearances by Billy Wilder, George Kuchar, Guy Maddin, and Jonas Mekas.
 
Monday, July 24
Adventures in Moviegoing with Brad Bird and Joe Morgenstern

The director of Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol and some of the most acclaimed animated films of the past few decades (Ratatouille, The Incredibles, The Iron Giant), Brad Bird speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Joe Morgenstern about his journey through cinema. Alongside the interview is a selection of films that have had an impact on Bird's life, including The Red Shoes (1948), Yojimbo (1961), and Stranger Than Paradise (1984). This program marks the eighth installment of Adventures in Moviegoing, a Channel-exclusive series in which artists from a variety of backgrounds discuss their formative cinematic experiences. Previous contributors include Jhumpa Lahiri, Jonathan Lethem, Mary Karr, Roger Corman, and Bill Hader.
 
Tuesday, July 25
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Kitty* and Fat Girl

Actor Chloë Sevigny made her directorial debut with Kitty, a luminous adaptation of a 1980 Paul Bowles short story in which a young girl finds herself transformed into a cat. Sevigny's film, which had its premiere at Cannes, serves as a prelude to a provocative feature that the director has selected herself: Catherine Breillat's 2001 Fat Girl, a shocking portrait of adolescent sexuality and strained sisterhood.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, July 26
The Graduate: Criterion Collection Edition #800

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of Mike Nichols's The Graduate, one of the most influential American films of the 1960s. In this bitingly funny tale of postcollegiate existential confusion, a young Dustin Hoffman stars as Benjamin Braddock, a recent graduate who has an affair with an older, married friend of the family (Anne Bancroft). Our edition features an audio commentary with Nichols and Steven Soderbergh, screen tests, a program on Harold Michelson's innovative storyboards, and interviews with Hoffman, screenwriter Buck Henry, and Paul Simon, whose songs form the centerpiece of the film's iconic soundtrack.
 
Thursday, July 27
Observations on Film Art No. 9: Chaplin's Comedy of Murders

Our Channel-exclusive series Observations on Film Art offers thought-provoking doses of film school for movie lovers, delivered by professors David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, and Jeff Smith, the authors of the canonical textbook Film Art: An Introduction. This month's episode features Bordwell examining how Charlie Chaplin jettisoned his iconic tramp persona to portray a cold-blooded serial killer in the 1947 satire Monsieur Verdoux. Previous subjects in this series include offscreen sound in Claude Chabrol's La cérémonie, camera movement in Krzysztof Kieślowski's Three Colors: Red, music in Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent, editing in Akira Kurosawa's Sanshiro Sugata, and landscapes in the work of Abbas Kiarostami.   
 
Friday, July 28
Friday Night Double Feature: La tête d'un homme and Stray Dog

Go on the chase with some of cinema's most charismatic detectives in this pair of thrillers inspired by the writing of Georges Simenon. In Julien Duvivier's 1933 La tête d'un homme, Harry Baur stars as the author's most iconic creation, Inspector Maigret, who spends the film investigating an American woman's murder in Paris. Toshiro Mifune's rookie homicide detective scours a sweltering Tokyo for his stolen gun, with the help of a seasoned detective (Takashi Shimura), in Akira Kurosawa's 1949 psychologically penetrating drama Stray Dog
 
---

Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

July 1
A Woman's Face, George Cukor, 1941
The Face Behind the Mask, Robert Florey, 1941
 
July 4
Premature, Gunhild Enger, 2012
Ten, Abbas Kiarostami, 2002
 
July 5
Weekend, Andrew Haigh, 2011
 
July 7
Young and Innocent, Alfred Hitchcock, 1937
 
July 14
What Did the Lady Forget?, Yasujiro Ozu, 1937
Ornamental Hairpin, Hiroshi Shimizu, 1941
Princess Yang Kwei-fei, Kenji Mizoguchi, 1955
Samurai Saga, Hiroshi Inagaki, 1959
The Third Shadow Warrior, Umetsugu Inoue, 1963
Sincere Heart, Masaki Kobayashi, 1953
 
July 17
Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff, Craig McCall, 2010
 
July 18
Asparagus, Suzan Pitt, 1979
 
July 19
Cameraperson, Kirsten Johnson, 2016
 
July 21
Fallen Angels, Wong Kar-wai, 1995
Chinese Odyssey 2002, Jeffrey Lau, 2002
Miao Miao, Cheng Hsiao-tse, 2008
The Eagle Shooting Heroes, Jeffrey Lau, 1993
The Rocking Horse Winner, Anthony Pelissier, 1949
 
July 25
Kitty, Chloë Sevigny, 2016
 
July 28
And the Ship Sails On, Federico Fellini, 1983
Il bidone, Federico Fellini, 1955
Le petit soldat, Jean-Luc Godard, 1963
 
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE


ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. Other recent additions to the programming include MEET THE FILMMAKER: ATHINA RACHEL TSANGARI and ADVENTURES IN MOVIEGOING WITH BILL HADER.


ABOUT FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck is a new subscription on-demand service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary and classic art house, indie, foreign and cult films. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, FilmStruck will be the new exclusive streaming home for the critically acclaimed and award-winning Criterion Collection, including the Criterion Channel, a new premium service programmed and curated by the Criterion team.  FilmStruck is Turner's first domestic direct-to-consumer offering launched in November 2016.


ABOUT THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium-from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to FilmStruck, the streaming service developed in collaboration with Turner Classic Movies - Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer's appreciation of the art of film.
 
 
 
For more information on FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel,
 

June 06, 2017

FILMSTRUCK NOW AVAILABLE ON ROKU

June 5, 2017

FilmStruck Now Available on Roku Platform

FilmStruck, the largest streaming library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films and the exclusive streaming home to the Criterion Collection, is now available on Roku® devices. FilmStruck's impressive library features a deep roster of constantly refreshed films from major Hollywood studios and celebrated indie studios and include award-winning titles such as Babette's Feast, Blow Out, Boyhood, Breaker Morant, Chicago, A Hard Day's Night, My Life as a Dog, Our Song, The Player, A Room with a View, Seven Samurai, The Seventh Seal, Thelma & Louise, The Times of Harvey Milk and The Umbrellas of Cherbourg. FilmStruck offers cinephiles a fully curated streaming experience including archival footage, audio commentaries, original film trailers and filmmaker interviews.

FilmStruck is also available for streaming on Google Chromecast second generation and Chromecast Ultra devices, Apple TV 4th generation devices, Amazon Fire TV, web, iOS and Android devices

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About FilmStruck

FilmStruck is a new subscription on-demand service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary and classic art house, indie, foreign and cult films. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, FilmStruck will be the new exclusive streaming home for the critically acclaimed and award-winning Criterion Collection, including the Criterion Channel, a new premium service programmed and curated by the Criterion team.  FilmStruck is Turner's first domestic direct-to-consumer offering launched in November 2016.

April 25, 2017

MAY PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

 
Includes Adventures in Moviegoing with Guillermo del Toro, Blow Out, Zatoichi and timeless classics (that were booed at Cannes)!
 
Tuesday, May 2
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Sea Horse* and L'Atalante

Taking to the water, this week's Short + Feature offers two very different - but equally dazzling - visions of the life aquatic. Jean Painlevé's mesmerizing short The Sea Horse (1933), a fourteen-minute science film that goes below the surface of the sea to glimpse the strange world of the titular creature, sets the stage for Jean Vigo's timeless masterpiece L'Atalante (1934), an intoxicating love story that takes place aboard a run-down river barge on the Seine.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, May 3
Blow Out*: Criterion Collection Edition #562

A conspiracy thriller for the ages, Brian De Palma's 1981 masterpiece features dazzling stylistic flourishes and John Travolta in one of his most memorable performances. The movie hits the Channel alongside all of the supplemental features from our release, including an hour-long interview with De Palma conducted by filmmaker Noah Baumbach, and De Palma's 1967 feature Murder à la Mod, which itself makes a cameo appearance in a scene in Blow Out.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Thursday, May 4
Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman: Criterion Collection Edition #679

Japan's longest-running action series centers on the adventures of Zatoichi (Shintaro Katsu), a blind masseur who also happens to be an incomparable swordsman. The inspiration for the blind warrior Chirrut Îmwe (Donnie Yen) in Rogue One, this charismatic action dynamo remains one of cinema's most iconic heroes. Our massive edition of the series features digital restorations of all twenty-five Zatoichi films made between 1962 and 1973, along with supplements that include an interview with Asian-film expert Tony Rayns and a 1978 documentary about Katsu, who portrayed Zatoichi through the entire length of the series and directed the twenty-fourth installment.
 
Friday, May 5
Friday Night Double Feature: The Element of Crime* and Europa*

This week's double bill brings together the bookends of Lars von Trier's Europa trilogy, two bold visions from his early career. The expressionist mystery The Element of Crime (1984), the director's stunning debut feature, takes place in a postapocalyptic future, while the Kafkaesque Europa (1991) immerses the viewer in a strangely futuristic Frankfurt in the aftermath of World War II.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Monday, May 8
John Bailey and Haskell Wexler on Days of Heaven

Terrence Malick's 1978 sophomore feature is a period drama of extraordinary visual beauty, depicting labor and leisure amid the wheat fields of the Texas panhandle in ravishing magic-hour images. In this piece, cinematographers John Bailey and Haskell Wexler share their memories of working on the film with Malick and Nestor Almendros, who took home an Oscar for the film's photography.
 
Tuesday, May 9
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Borom sarret* and Black Girl

The most renowned figure of twentieth-century African cinema, the Senegalese writer-director Ousmane Sembène crafted stark, stirring dramas that addressed urgent social and political concerns. This week's Short + Feature shows that his mastery of the form came early: his acclaimed short Borom sarret (1963), about a luckless cart driver on the streets of Dakar, bears witness to the personal effects of the postcolonial order, as does his harrowing first feature, Black Girl (1966), about a Senegalese woman mistreated by her white employers in a small town on the French Riviera.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, May 10
The Secret of the Grain*: Criterion Collection Edition #527

Six years before winning the Palme d'Or in 2013 for his controversial coming-of-age romance Blue Is the Warmest Color, Tunisian French filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche delivered this bustling, multigenerational saga about family and food. Our complete edition of the film arrives this week on the Channel, complete with Sueur, Kechiche's reedit of the film's climactic belly-dancing sequence, as well as interviews with the writer-director and many of his key collaborators.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, May 12
Friday Night Double Feature: Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words and News from Home

In celebration of Mother's Day this weekend, we've paired two moving portraits of maternal love. Stig Björkman's 2015 documentary Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words assembles Super 8 and 16 mm home-movie footage, taken by the icon herself, into an intimate view of her complex life as an artist, wife, and mother. Chantal Akerman's melancholy 1976 urban portrait News from Home pairs meditative shots of New York City, where the director relocated in the early seventies, with readings of letters from her mother on the voice-over.
 
Monday, May 15
Booed at Cannes!

From Michelangelo Antonioni to Lars von Trier, some of the world's most lauded auteurs have elicited derisive responses at their Cannes premieres, only to have their polarizing films later hailed as masterpieces. With the seventieth edition of the festival opening this week, we're gathering a selection of these controversial works: Antonioni's L'avventura (1960), Carl Th. Dreyer's Gertrud (1964), Robert Bresson's L'argent (1983), Jane Campion's Sweetie (1989), and von Trier's Antichrist (2009).
 
Tuesday, May 16
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Butter Lamp* and Yi Yi

The complex role of photography in everyday life is explored in Hu Wei's 2013 Oscar-nominated short Butter Lamp and Edward Yang's 2000 masterpiece Yi Yi. Hu's film charts the story of a photographer and his assistant as they take family portraits in a remote Tibetan village, in the process observing the erosion of local culture by the forces of globalization. Yang's intimate epic captures the tensions lying beneath the surface of contemporary middle-class Taipei, highlighting the perspective of a young boy who becomes obsessed with his camera.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, May 17
Fish Tank*: Criterion Collection Edition #553

This week, we're turning the spotlight on British filmmaker Andrea Arnold and her Cannes Jury Prize-winning Fish Tank. This gritty work of social realism follows the coming-of-age of a fifteen-year-old housing project resident (the remarkable Katie Jarvis) struggling with her burgeoning sexual attraction toward her mother's predatory new boyfriend (Michael Fassbender). The supplements from our edition include a conversation with Fassbender and three of the director's short films: Milk (1998), Dog (2001), and the Oscar-winning Wasp (2003).
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, May 18
Blow Up of Blow Up: A 2016 Documentary

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of Antonioni's countercultural masterpiece last year, Italian journalist Valentina Agostinis created this documentary portrait, which revisits key locations in the film, explores the auteur's meticulous approach to art direction and photography, and features interviews with dialogue assistant Piers Haggard, fashion photographer David Montgomery, former Yardbirds manager Simon Napier-Bell, and others.
 
Friday, May 19
Friday Night Double Feature: A Man Escaped and La Haine

This week, we've paired two films that share a spirit of rebellion and skillfully align our sympathies with the underdogs they portray: Robert Bresson's A Man Escaped (1956) and Mathieu Kassovitz's La haine (1995). Both Bresson's suspenseful yet humane jailbreak masterpiece and Kassovitz's gritty look at cultural volatility in contemporary France received the best director award at Cannes.
 
Monday, May 22
All the Screen's a Stage

This series lifts a curtain on the passions, triumphs, illusions, and foibles of theater people-and shows how such cinematic masters as Ingmar Bergman, Jean Renoir, and Max Ophuls have drawn inspiration from the art of stagecraft. The lineup - which includes Marcel Carné's Children of Paradise, Jean Renoir's The Golden Coach, and Ingmar Bergman's Fanny and Alexander - features a series introduction by Criterion Channel programmer Michael Sragow.
 
Tuesday, May 23
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Next Floor* and Babette's Feast

Treat yourself to a two-course meal: an early short by Denis Villeneuve (Arrival) gives a grotesque new meaning to the phrase "all you can eat," while Gabriel Axel's Oscar-winning adaptation of a story by Isak Dinesen serves up a feast for the spirit.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, May 24
I Knew Her Well: Criterion Collection Edition #801

Antonio Pietrangeli cuts commedia all'italiana with a dose of melancholy in this underappreciated classic, an episodic portrait of a beautiful young woman making her way through the celebrity-obsessed and sexually liberated Rome of the 1960s. This edition's supplements include a recent interview with actor Stefania Sandrelli (The Conformist), as well as archival footage from her audition for the film.
 
Thursday, May 25
Adventures in Moviegoing with Guillermo del Toro

In the latest installment of our Adventures in Moviegoing series, the director of Pan's Labyrinth and Cronos joins MythBusters' Adam Savage to talk about his cinematic passions and influences. To accompany their conversation, del Toro has selected some of the inspirations - including Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face and Jean Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast - that have helped fuel the nightmares and fantasies that play out in his own visionary films. Past contributors to the series include Jonathan Lethem, Mary Karr, Roger Corman, and Michael Cera.
 
Friday, May 26
Friday Night Double Feature: Rome Open City and Brief Encounter

What does Roberto Rossellini's revolutionary portrait of a city under occupation have in common with David Lean's achingly sad story of a love affair? Both of these heartbreakingly humane films were among the winners of the top prize at the 1946 Cannes Film Festival.
 
Monday, May 29
Observations on Film Art No. 7: Staging in The Rules of the Game

In the latest installment of our Observations on Film Art series, Professor Kristin Thompson maps out the intricate staging of Jean Renoir's The Rules of the Game. Famed for its deep-focus photography, the film nimbly traces the intersecting loves, rivalries, aggressions, and jealousies that play out over the course of a weekend at a country estate. Watch Thompson's analysis to learn how Renoir sets his tragicomic machine in motion, then check out the other entries in the series for more insights from her and her fellow authors of the canonical textbook Film Art: An Introduction, David Bordwell and Jeff Smith. Previous subjects include the music in Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent, the editing in Akira Kurosawa's Sanshiro Sugata, and landscapes in the work of Abbas Kiarostami.
 
Tuesday, May 30
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Cailleach* and I Know Where I'm Going!

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger set their sprightly romantic comedy I Know Where I'm Going! in the gloom of the remote Scottish Hebrides. That story of a headstrong woman's unexpected romance with a handsome naval officer is paired with Cailleach, a short documentary from 2015 that profiles another independent woman in the same location-one who knows where she's staying above all. Rosie Reed Hillman's tender portrait of Morag, an elderly sheep farmer who has lived her whole life in the rugged area, makes for a poetic complement to the Archers' effervescent fable.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

May 1
Bitter Victory, Nicholas Ray, 1957

May 2
The Sea Horse, Jean Painlevé, 1933

May 3
Blow Out, Brian De Palma, 1981

May 5
The Element of Crime, Lars von Trier, 1984
Europa, Lars von Trier, 1991
The Marriage of Chiffon, Claude Autant-Lara, 1942
Douce, Claude Autant-Lara, 1943
Sylvia and the Phantom, Claude Autant-Lara, 1946

May 9
Borom sarret, Ousmane Sembène, 1963

May 10
The Secret of the Grain, Abdellatif Kechiche, 2007

May 12
Nacional III, Luis García Berlanga, 1982
Barrios altos, Luis García Berlanga, 1987
La boutique, Luis García Berlanga, 1967

May 16
Butter Lamp, Hu Wei, 2013

May 17
Fish Tank, Andrea Arnold, 2009

May 19
Katzelmacher, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1969
Chinese Roulette, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1976
Satan's Brew, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1976
Querelle, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1982

May 23
Next Floor, Denis Villeneuve, 2008

May 30
Cailleach, Rosie Reed Hillman, 2014
 
 
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ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. Other recent additions to the programming include MEET THE FILMMAKER: ATHINA RACHEL TSANGARI and ADVENTURES IN MOVIEGOING WITH BILL HADER.


ABOUT FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck is a new subscription on-demand service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary and classic art house, indie, foreign and cult films. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, FilmStruck will be the new exclusive streaming home for the critically acclaimed and award-winning Criterion Collection, including the Criterion Channel, a new premium service programmed and curated by the Criterion team.  FilmStruck is Turner's first domestic direct-to-consumer offering launched in November 2016.


ABOUT THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium-from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to FilmStruck, the streaming service developed in collaboration with Turner Classic Movies - Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer's appreciation of the art of film.
 

April 17, 2017

APRIL ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK... CONTINUES!

       
 
Includes Adventures in Moviegoing with Michael Cera, 
AntichristTatsuya Nakadai on his films, and Split Screen!
 
Just added to the calendar:
Friday Night Double Feature: The Trip and The Trip to Italy
 
 
Monday, April 17
Tatsuya Nakadai on Five Japanese Masters
Japanese icon Tatsuya Nakadai stopped by Criterion to discuss his storied career, sharing some of the lessons he learned from working with luminaries Akira Kurosawa, Mikio Naruse, Masaki Kobayashi, Kihachi Okamoto, and Hiroshi Teshigahara. Alongside the interview, we present a genre-hopping selection of films that feature his most pivotal roles: Kurosawa's Seven Samurai (1954), Yojimbo(1961), and Sanjuro (1962), Kobayashi's Black River (1956), The Human Condition(1959), and Harakiri (1962), Okamoto's The Sword of Doom (1966), and Naruse's When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (1960).

Tuesday, April 18
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Pay Day and A Taxing Woman
On the heels of Tax Day, this week's Short + Feature pairs two playful films that follow the money: Charlie Chaplin's 1922 Pay Day, a silent short about the wage-related bickering of a bricklayer and his wife, and Juzo Itami's 1987 A Taxing Woman, a tax-collector comedy that the Tampopo director was inspired to make after joining a higher tax bracket himself.
 
Wednesday, April 19
Antichrist*: Criterion Collection Edition #542
Take in Lars von Trier's Antichrist in all its controversial glory, as the graphic psychodrama arrives on the Channel with the complete supplements from the edition, including several behind-the-scenes videos and a documentary on the film's now-legendary premiere at Cannes.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Thursday, April 20
Cinéastes de notre temps: Jean Vigo
As part of our ongoing presentation of episodes from Cinéastes de notre temps(1964-72), a French television series that profiled filmmakers from around the world, we're spotlighting one of the show's first installments. In this 1964 documentary, French New Wave director Jacques Rozier chronicles the life of one of cinema's great enfants terribles, Jean Vigo, who died of tuberculosis at the age of twenty-nine after making just a handful of films, including the redoubtable masterpiece L'Atalante(1934). Compiling interviews with a variety of friends and collaborators of Vigo's, this program attests to the rebellious and poetic spirit the director brought to his work.
 
Friday, April 21
Friday Night Double Feature: Red Desert and The Last Wave
Environmental threats hang over these two atmospheric mood pieces, featured on the Channel just in time for Earth Day. Antonioni's first color film evokes the creeping malaise that comes with industrialization, while the apocalypse itself looms nigh in Peter Weir's beguiling mystery, a dreamlike investigation of the fissures between colonial and aboriginal Australia.

Monday, April 24
Adventures in Moviegoing with Michael Cera
In the latest installment of our Adventures in Moviegoing series, the star of Juno, Superbad, and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World stops by our office to tell us how he became a cinephile and to share some of his favorite films, including Rainer Werner Fassbinder's Fox and His Friends (1975) and Nagisa Oshima's Empire of Passion(1978). Past contributors to the series include Bill Hader, Jonathan Lethem, Mary Karr, and Roger Corman.

Tuesday, April 25
Tuesday's Short + Feature: J. M. Mondésir* and Rashomon
It's all about point of view in this week's Short + Feature, which pairs Akira Kurosawa's 1950 psychological thriller Rashomon with the 2012 French short J. M. Mondésir, about a man who dies after an encounter with the police. Taking a cue from Kurosawa's hallowed classic, writer-director Alice Colomer-Kang examines the elusive nature of truth and interpretation by telling her story from multiple perspectives.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 

Wednesday, April 26
The Tree of Wooden Clogs*: Criterion Collection Edition #854
Director Ermanno Olmi (Il posto) evokes the rhythms of a bygone way of life in this 1978 Palme d'Or winner, tracing the lives and labors of northern Italian peasants through the seasons. This newly restored masterpiece makes its debut on the Channel complete with all of the special features that appear on its recently released disc edition, including a television program that pays a visit to the farm where the film was shot and an introduction by Mike Leigh, whose own films reflect the naturalistic rigor of Olmi's craft.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 

Thursday, April 27
Observations on Film Art No. 6: Camera Movement in Three Colors: Red
In our ongoing, Channel-exclusive series Observations on Film Art, film scholars David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, and Jeff Smith explore the nuts and bolts of cinematic style through individual works by great auteurs. In the latest episode, Smith walks us through the eerie metaphysics of Three Colors: Red, demonstrating how director Krzysztof Kieślowski uses camera movements to establish mysterious connections between two characters who are largely unaware of each other. Previous entries in this series have examined topics like Sanshiro Sugata's lightning-fast editing and Abbas Kiarostami's evocative use of landscape.

Friday, April 28
Friday Night Double Feature: The Trip* and The Trip to Italy*
"Gentlemen to bed, for we rise at 9:30-ish!" Now on the Criterion Channel, the first two hysterically funny entries in Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon's epicurean travel series. With wine, food, and celebrity impersonations galore, the UK's sharpest comedy duo make their way through England and Italy. Soon they'll hit the road again in The Trip to Spain, premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
The Triplimited engagement, ends October 27.
The Trip to Italy: limited engagement, ends October 27.
 
Saturday, April 29
Split Screen Season Four
Your wild ride through the indie film world-by filmmakers, for everyone. From 1997 to 2001, producer and author John Pierson and his band of cinephiles roved the U.S., seeking pockets of movie madness for this irreverent, sixty-episode IFC series. The result is an indispensible portrait of the American independent film scene at the turn of the millennium. Seasons one through three are already on the Channel, and this month, we debut season four!

November 30, 2016

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