593 posts categorized "Current Affairs"

September 09, 2017

OFFICIAL AWARDS – 74th VENICE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

 
OFFICIAL AWARDS – 74th VENICE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
 
VENEZIA 74
The Venezia 74 Jury, chaired by Annette Bening, and comprised of Ildikó EnyediMichel FrancoRebecca HallAnna MouglalisDavid StrattonJasmine TrincaEdgar Wright and Yonfan having viewed all 21 films in competition, has decided as follows:
 
GOLDEN LION for Best Film to:
THE SHAPE OF WATER
 
SILVER LION - GRAND JURY PRIZE to:
FOXTROT 
by Samuel Maoz (Israel, Germany, France, Switzerland)
 
SILVER LION - AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTOR to:
Xavier Legrand 
for the film JUSQU’À LA GARDE (France)
 
COPPA VOLPI
for Best Actress:
Charlotte Rampling
in the film HANNAH by Andrea Pallaoro (Italy, Belgium, France)
 
COPPA VOLPI
for Best Actor:
Kamel El Basha
in the film THE INSULT by Ziad Doueiri (Lebanon, France)
 
AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY to:
for the film THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI by Martin McDonagh (Great Britain)
 
SPECIAL JURY PRIZE to:
SWEET COUNTRY
by Warwick Thornton (Australia)
 
for Best Young Actor or Actress to:
Charlie Plummer
in the film LEAN ON PETE by Andrew Haigh (Great Britain)
 
 
LION OF THE FUTURE
“LUIGI DE LAURENTIIS” VENICE AWARD FOR A DEBUT FILM
Lion of the Future – “Luigi De Laurentiis” Venice Award for a Debut Film Jury at the 74th Venice Film Festival, chaired by Benoît Jacquot and comprised of Geoff Andrew, Albert Lee, Greta Scarano and Yorgos Zois has decided to award:
 
LION OF THE FUTURE
“LUIGI DE LAURENTIIS” VENICE AWARD FOR A DEBUT FILM to:
JUSQU’À LA GARDE
by Xavier Legrand (France)
VENEZIA 74
 
as well as a prize of 100,000 USD, donated by Filmauro to be divided equally between director and producer.
 
ORIZZONTI AWARDS
The Orizzonti Jury of the 74th Venice International Film Festival, chaired by Gianni Amelio and composed of  Rakhshan BanietemadAmi Canaan MannMark CousinsAndrés DupratFien Troch and Rebecca Zlotowski, after screening the 31 films in competition has decided to award:
 
the ORIZZONTI AWARD FOR BEST FILM to:
NICO, 1988
by Susanna Nicchiarelli (Italy, Belgium)
 
the ORIZZONTI AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTOR to:
Vahid Jalilvand
for BEDOUNE TARIKH, BEDOUNE EMZA (NO DATE, NO SIGNATURE) (Iran)
 
the SPECIAL ORIZZONTI JURY PRIZE to:
CANIBA
by Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor (France, USA)
 
the ORIZZONTI AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS to:
Lyna Khoudri
in LES BIENHEUREUX by Sofia Djama (France, Belgium, Qatar)
 
the ORIZZONTI AWARD FOR BEST ACTOR to:
Navid Mohammadzadeh
in BEDOUNE TARIKH, BEDOUNE EMZA (NO DATE, NO SIGNATURE)
by Vahid Jalilvand (Iran)
 
the ORIZZONTI AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY to:
Dominique Welinski and René Ballesteros
for LOS VERSOS DEL OLVIDO by Alireza Khatami 
(France, Germany, Netherlands, Chile)
 
the ORIZZONTI AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FILM to:
GROS CHAGRIN
by Céline Devaux (France)
 
the VENICE SHORT FILM NOMINATION FOR THE
EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS 2017 to:
GROS CHAGRIN
by Céline Devaux (France)
 
VENICE VIRTUAL REALITY AWARDS
The Venice VR Jury of the 74th Venice International Film Festival, chaired by John Landis and composed of Cécile Sciamma and Ricky Tognazzi has decided to award:
 
the BEST VR AWARD to:
ARDEN’S WAKE (EXPANDED)
by Eugene YK Chung (USA)
 
the BEST VR EXPERIENCE AWARD (FOR INTERACTIVE CONTENT) to:
LA CAMERA INSABBIATA
by Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang (USA, Taiwan)
 
the BEST VR STORY AWARD (FOR LINEAR CONTENT) to:
BLOODLESS
by Gina Kim (South Korea, USA)
 
VENICE CLASSICS AWARDS
The Venice Classics Jury, chaired by Giuseppe Piccioni composed of 26 students of Cinema History, chosen in particular from the professors of 12 Italian Dams university programmes and from the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, has decided to award:
 
the VENICE CLASSICS AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY ON CINEMA to:
THE PRINCE AND THE DYBBUK
by Elwira Niewiera and Piotr Rosołowski (Poland, Germany)
 
the VENICE CLASSICS AWARD FOR BEST RESTORED FILM to:
IDI I SMOTRI (COME AND SEE)
by Elem Klimov (USSR, 1985)
 
GOLDEN LION FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT 2017 to:
Jane Fonda
Robert Redford
 
JAEGER-LECOULTRE GLORY TO THE FILMMAKER AWARD 2017 to:
Stephen Frears
 

COLLATERAL AWARDS

Arca CinemaGiovani Award

Venezia 74 Best Film: FOXTROT by Samuel Maoz

Best Italian Film: BEAUTIFUL THINGS by Giorgio Ferrero

BNL People's Choice Award – Giornate degli Autori

GA’AGUA (LONGING) by Savi Gabizon

Brian Award

LES BIENHEUREUX by Sofia Djama

Circolo del Cinema di Verona Award – 32nd Venice International Film Critics’ Week

TEAM HURRICANE by Annika Berg

Civitas Vitae Award

IL COLORE NASCOSTO DELLE COSE by Silvio Soldini

Fair Play Cinema Award

EX LIBRIS - THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY by Frederick Wiseman         

Special Mention: HUMAN FLOW by Ai Weiwei    

Fedeora Award (Federazione dei Critici Europei e dei Paesi Mediterranei)

Best Film: EYE ON JULIET by Kim Nguyen

Best Director of a Debut Film: SARA FORESTIER for M

Best Actor: REDOUANNE HARJANE for M

FEDIC Award

LA VITA IN COMUNE by Edoardo Winspeare

Special Mention: NICO, 1988 by Susanna Nicchiarelli

Mention FEDIC – Il giornale del cibo: LE VISITE by Elio Di Pace

FIPRESCI Award

EX LIBRIS - THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY by Frederick Wiseman         

Best Debut Film: LOS VERSOS DEL OLVIDO by Alireza Khatami

Fondazione Mimmo Rotella Award

GEORGE CLOONEY, MICHAEL CAINE and AI WEIWEI

Enrico Fulchignoni – CICT-UNESCO Award

HUMAN FLOW by Ai Weiwei

Future Film Festival Digital Award

THE SHAPE OF WATER by Guillermo del Toro

Special Mention: GATTA CENERENTOLA by A. Rak, I. Cappiello, M. Guarnieri, D. Sansone 

GdA Director’s Award - Giornate degli Autori

CANDELARIA by Jhonny Hendrix Hinestroza

Green Drop Award 

FIRST REFORMED by Paul Schrader  

HRNs Award – Special Prize for Human Rights

THE RAPE OF RACY TAYLOR by Nancy Buirski

Special Mention: L’ORDINE DELLE COSE by Andrea Segre

Special Mention: HUMAN FLOW by Ai Weiwei

Interfilm Award

LOS VERSOS DEL OLVIDO by Alireza Khatami

Label Europa Cinemas Award

M by Sara Forestier                                                                                                      

Lanterna Magica Award (CGS)

L'EQUILIBRIO by Vincenzo Marra

La Pellicola d’Oro Award

Best Production Manager in an Italian Film: DANIELE SPINOZZI for Ammore e Malavita

Best Production Manager in an International Film: RICCARDO MARCHEGIANI for Mektoub My Love: Canto Uno

Best Stagehand: ROBERTO DI PIETRO for Hannah

Leoncino d’Oro Agiscuola Award

THE LEISURE SEEKER by Paolo Virzì 

Cinema for UNICEF Award: HUMAN FLOW by Ai Weiwei

Lizzani Award

GÉRÔME BOURDEZEAU and DOMINIQUE BATTESTI

IL COLORE NASCOSTO DELLE COSE by Silvio Soldini

Lina Mangiacapre Award

LES BIENHEUREUX by Sofia Djama

Mouse d’Oro Award

MEKTOUB, MY LOVE: CANTO UNO by Abdellatif Kechiche

Mouse d’Argento Award: GATTA CENERENTOLA by A. Rak, I. Cappiello, M. Guarnieri, D. Sansone 

NuovoImaie Talent Award

FEDERICA ROSELLINI for Dove cadono le ombre

MIMMO BORRELLI for L’equilibrio

Open Award

GATTA CENERENTOLA by A. Rak, I. Cappiello, M. Guarnieri, D. Sansone

Francesco Pasinetti Award – SNGCI

AMMORE E MALAVITA by Manetti Bros.    

Special Award: GATTA CENERENTOLA by A. Rak, I. Cappiello, M. Guarnieri, D. Sansone 

Special Award: NICO, 1988 by Susanna Nicchiarelli                                                                       

Gillo Pontecorvo Award - Arcobaleno Latino

MIAO XIAOTIAN, CEO of China Film Coproduction Corporation

Queer Lion Award

MARVIN by Anne Fontaine

Mario Serandrei – Hotel Saturnia Award for the Best Technical Contribution – 32nd Venice International Film Critics’ Week

LES GARÇONS SAUVAGES by Bertrand Mandico

Sfera 1932 Award

LA MÉLODIE by Rachid Hami  

SIAE Audience Award – 32nd Venice International Film Critics’ Week

TEMPORADA DE CAZA by Natalia Garagiola

SIGNIS Award

LA VILLA by Robert Guédiguian

Special Mention: FOXTROT by Samuel Maoz

C. Smithers Foundation Award – CICT-UNESCO

THE SHAPE OF WATER by Guillermo del Toro

Sorriso Diverso Venezia 2017 Award - Ass Ucl

IL COLORE NASCOSTO DELLE COSE by Silvio Soldini

Soundtrack Stars Award

ALEXANDRE DESPLAT for The Shape of Water

Special Award: AMMORE E MALAVITA by Manetti Bros.

Lifetime Achievement Award to ANDREA GUERRA

UNIMED Award

LA VILLA by Robert Guédiguian

Special Mention: BRUTTI E CATTIVI by Cosimo Gomez

September 05, 2017

LADY BIRD — Yet Another Gasp of Mumblecore


Greta Gerwig's "Lady Bird," starring Saoirse Ronan (pronounced Ser-Sha, as in Sersha, Sersha, Sersha) finds Gerwig going all semi-autobiographical mumblecore, as if that Godforsaken genre weren't already long dead gone. Let's just say this looks to be an ideal movie for entitled white girls to get all touchy feely over while hiding in blind spots to the rest of society. Yes, yes, yes, here is yet another me, me, me movie that will probably be every bit annoying as "Tiny Furniture." Blech. I feel dirty for even having watched the trailer. Search it out if you must in the upcoming New York Film Festival —September 28 through October 15.

August 28, 2017

Ex Libris: The New York Public Library — Trailer

 

Included in my list of Most Promising Films of 2017 is this film, Frederick Wiseman's documentary about the New York Public Library. Frederick Wiseman is one of the most gifted and prolific documentarians in the world; this film is a cause for celebration. This is a doc to seek out!

August 18, 2017

Weekend Update: Tina Fey on Protesting After Charlottesville - SNL

Tina Fey hits it out of the park on this one! Wow!

August 16, 2017

DANIEL CRAIG TO RETURN FOR NEXT 007 FEATURE

Colesmithey.com

Daniel Craig confirmed on last night's episode of The Stephen Colbert Show that he will return for one last James Bond film. Hallelujah! Daniel Craig has been a pitch-perfect addition to the 007 franchise. Oh, how we love watching Craig's Bond get in and out of trouble. The as yet untitled Bond feature is slated for release on November 8, 2018.

Colesmtihey.com

August 14, 2017

TOM CRUISE INJURED ON MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 6 SHOOT

From the looks of it, Tom Cruise probably sustained a few cracked ribs and perhaps a broken knee when he attempted to jump from a scaffolding to the roof of a building in London during filming of a scene for his upcoming film "Mission Impossible 6." The film is scheduled for release in July 2018.

Known for performing many of his own stunts, Tom Cruise might want to reconsider leaving such dangerous maneuvers to professional stunt men. While no reports have yet been released about the extent of Cruise's injuries, it seems certain that a visit to a hospital and a period of recovery are in order for the actor whose bravery regarding stunts is unassailable. This is one painful video clip to watch.

UPDATE: It has been reported that Cruise broke two bones, and will be unable to continue filming "Mission Impossible 6" for a minimum of eight weeks.

UPDATE: As of Thursday August 17, it is reported that Tom Cruise broke his right ankle and his hip in the accident. 

Colesmithey.com

August 10, 2017

100 YEARS OF OLYMPIC FILMS — CRITERION

presents
 
100 YEARS OF
OLYMPIC FILMS
 
Deluxe Blu-ray and DVD collector's sets include 53 films
and a 216-page illustrated book, to be released December 5, 2017
 
Features landmark work by Kon Ichikawa, Bud Greenspan, Milos Forman,
Leni Reifenstahl, Claude Lelouch, Masahiro Shinoda and many more!
 
 
We are pleased to announce Criterion's upcoming release of 100 YEARS OF OLYMPIC FILMS. Spanning fifty-three movies and forty-one editions of the Olympic Summer and Winter Games, this one-of-a-kind collection assembles, for the first time, a century's worth of Olympic films - the culmination of a monumental, award-winning archival project encompassing dozens of new restorations by the International Olympic Committee.
 
These documentaries cast a cinematic eye on some of the most iconic moments in the history of modern sports, spotlighting athletes who embody the Olympic motto of "Faster, Higher, Stronger": Jesse Owens shattering sprinting world records on the track in 1936 Berlin, Jean Claude-Killy dominating the slopes of Grenoble in 1968, Joan Benoit breaking away to win the first-ever women's marathon on the streets of Los Angeles in 1984.
 
In addition to the work of Bud Greenspan, the man behind an impressive ten Olympic features, this stirring collective chronicle of triumph and defeat includes such landmarks of the documentary form as Leni Riefenstahl's Olympia and Kon Ichikawa's Tokyo Olympiad, along with lesser- known but captivating contributions by major directors like Claude Lelouch, Carlos Saura, and Milos Forman. It also serves as a fascinating window onto the formal development of cinema itself, as well as the technological progress that has enabled the viewer, over the years, to get ever closer to the action. Traversing continents and decades, and reflecting as well the social, cultural, and political changes that have shaped our recent history, this remarkable marathon of films offers nothing less than a panorama of a hundred years of human endeavor.
 
BLU-RAY AND DVD SPECIAL EDITION COLLECTOR'S SETS FEATURE
* 53 newly restored films from 41 editions of the Olympic Games, presented together for the first time 
* Landmark 4K restorations of OlympiaTokyo Olympiad, and Visions of Eight, among other titles
* New scores for the silent films, composed by Maud Nelissen, Donald Sosin, and Frido ter Beek
* A lavishly illustrated, 216-page, hardcover book, featuring notes on the films by cinema historian Peter Cowie; a foreword by Thomas Bach, President of the International Olympic Committee; a short history of the restoration project by restoration producer Adrian Wood; and hundreds of photographs from a century of Olympic Games
 
HIGHLIGHTS FROM A CENTURY OF OLYMPIC FILMS
 
Stockholm 1912
The Games of the V Olympiad Stockholm, 1912 (dir. Adrian Wood)
 
Berlin 1936
Olympia Part One: Festival of the Nations (dir. Leni Riefenstahl)
Olympia Part Two: Festival of Beauty (dir. Leni Riefenstahl)
 
Cortina d'Ampezzo 1956
White Vertigo (dir. Giorgio Ferroni)
 
Tokyo 1964
Tokyo Olympiad (dir. Kon Ichikawa)

Grenoble 1968
13 Days in France (dirs. Claude Lelouch, François Reichenbach)
 
Sapporo 1972
Sapporo Winter Olympics (dir. Masahiro Shinoda)
 
Munich 1972
Visions of Eight (dirs. Milos Forman, Kon Ichikawa, Claude Lelouch, Yuri Ozerov, Arthur Penn, Michael Pfleghar, John Schlesinger, Mai Zetterling)
 
Barcelona 1992
Marathon (dir. Carlos Saura)
 
 
32-BLU-RAY EDITION
SRP $399.95 PREBOOK 11/7/17 STREET 12/5/17
CAT. NO. CC2811BD ISBN 978-1-68143-361-5 UPC 7-15515-20451-4
 
43-DVD EDITION
SRP $399.95
PREBOOK 11/7/17 STREET 12/5/17
CAT. NO. CC2812DDVD ISBN 978-1-68143-362-2 UPC 7-15515-20461-3 

August 08, 2017

NYFF 55: MAIN SLATE

NYFF 55

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER ANNOUNCES MAIN SLATE SELECTIONS FOR THE 55th NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL  

 25 features include new films from Sean Baker, Noah Baumbach, Serge Bozon, Robin Campillo, Claire Denis, Arnaud Desplechin, Philippe Garrel, Greta Gerwig, Alain Gomis, Valeska Grisebach, Luca Guadagnino, Agnieszka Holland, Hong Sang-soo, Aki Kaurismäki, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Lucrecia Martel, Ruben Östlund, Dee Rees, Joachim Trier, Agnès Varda & JR, and Chloé Zhao


L to R: Zama, On the Beach at Night Alone, Ismael’s Ghosts, Félicité, Lover for a Day, BPM (Beats Per Minute), 
The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected), The Square, Thelma

New York, NY (August 8, 2017) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces the 25 films for the Main Slate of the 55th New York Film Festival, September 28 – October 15.

NYFF Director and Selection Committee Chair Kent Jones said, “Every year, I’m asked about the themes in our Main Slate line-up, and every year I say the same thing: we choose the best films we see, and the common themes and preoccupations arise only after the fact. As I look at this slate of beautiful work, I could just make a series of simple observations: that these films come from all over the globe; that there is a nice balance of filmmakers known and unknown to many here in New York; that the overall balance between frankness and artistry holds me in awe; that there are two gala selections with the word ‘wonder’ in their titles; and that eight of the 25 films were directed by women.”

This year’s Main Slate showcases films honored at Cannes including Ruben Östlund’s Palme d’Or–winner The Square; Robin Campillo’s BPM, awarded the Cannes Critics’ Prize; and Agnès Varda & JR’s Faces Places, which took home the Golden Eye. From Berlin, Aki Kaurismäki’s Silver Bear–winner The Other Side of Hope and Agnieszka Holland’s Alfred Bauer Prize–winner Spoor mark the returns of two New York Film Festival veterans, while Luca Guadagnino’s acclaimed Call Me by Your Name will be his NYFF debut. Also returning are Arnaud Desplechin, Noah Baumbach, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Claire Denis, Philippe Garrel, Lucrecia Martel, and Hong Sang-soo, who has two features in the lineup this year, while filmmakers new to the festival include Sean Baker, Greta Gerwig, Serge Bozon, Dee Rees, Chloé Zhao, Joachim Trier, Alain Gomis, and Valeska Grisebach.

As previously announced, the NYFF55 Opening Night is Richard Linklater’s Last Flag Flying, Todd Haynes’s Wonderstruck is Centerpiece, and Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel will close the festival.

The 55th New York Film Festival Main Slate

Opening Night
Last Flag Flying
Dir. Richard Linklater

Centerpiece
Wonderstruck
Dir. Todd Haynes

Closing Night
Wonder Wheel
Dir. Woody Allen

Before We Vanish
Dir. Kiyoshi Kurosawa

BPM (Beats Per Minute)/120 battements par minute
Dir. Robin Campillo

Bright Sunshine In/Un beau soleil intérieur
Dir. Claire Denis

Call Me by Your Name
Dir. Luca Guadagnino

The Day After
Dir. Hong Sang-soo

Faces Places/Visages villages
Dir. Agnès Varda & JR

Félicité
Dir. Alain Gomis

The Florida Project
Dir. Sean Baker

Ismael’s Ghosts/Les fantômes d’Ismaël
Dir. Arnaud Desplechin

Lady Bird
Dir. Greta Gerwig

Lover for a Day/L’Amant d’un jour
Dir. Philippe Garrel

The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)
Dir. Noah Baumbach

Mrs. Hyde/Madame Hyde
Dir. Serge Bozon

Mudbound
Dir. Dee Rees

On the Beach at Night Alone
Dir. Hong Sang-soo

The Other Side of Hope/Toivon tuolla puolen
Dir. Aki Kaurismäki

The Rider
Dir. Chloé Zhao

Spoor/Pokot
Dir. Agnieszka Holland, in cooperation with Kasia Adamik

The Square
Dir. Ruben Östlund

Thelma
Dir. Joachim Trier

Western
Dir. Valeska Grisebach

Zama
Dir. Lucrecia Martel


NYFF Special Events, Spotlight on Documentary, Revivals, Convergence, and Projections sections, as well as filmmaker conversations and panels, will be announced in the coming weeks.

The 18-day New York Film Festival highlights the best in world cinema, featuring works from celebrated filmmakers as well as fresh new talent. The selection committee, chaired by Jones, also includes Dennis Lim, FSLC Director of Programming; Florence Almozini, FSLC Associate Director of Programming; and Amy Taubin, Contributing Editor, Film Comment and Sight & Sound.

Tickets for the 55th New York Film Festival will go on sale September 10. VIP passes and packages are on sale now and offer one of the earliest opportunities to purchase tickets and secure seats at some of the festival’s biggest events. Learn more at filmlinc.org/packages

55th NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL
Films & Descriptions

Colesmithey.com

Opening Night
Last Flag Flying
Dir. Richard Linklater, USA, 2017, 119m
World Premiere
In Richard Linklater’s lyrical road movie, as funny as it is heartbreaking, three aging Vietnam-era Navy vets—soft-spoken Doc (Steve Carell), unhinged and unfiltered Sal (Bryan Cranston), and quietly measured Mueller (Laurence Fishburne)—reunite to perform a sacred task: the proper burial of Doc’s only child, who has been killed in the early days of the Iraq invasion. As this trio of old friends makes its way up the Eastern seaboard, Linklater gives us a rich rendering of friendship, a grand mosaic of common life in the USA during the Bush era, and a striking meditation on the passage of time and the nature of truth. To put it simply, Last Flag Flying is a great movie from one of America’s finest filmmakers. An Amazon Studios release.

Centerpiece
Wonderstruck
Dir. Todd Haynes, USA, 2017, 117m
In 1977, following the death of his single mother, Ben (Oakes Fegley) loses his hearing in a freak accident and makes his way from Minnesota to New York, hoping to learn about the father he has never met. A half-century earlier, another deaf 12-year-old, Rose (Millicent Simmonds), flees her restrictive Hoboken home, captivated by the bustle and romance of the nearby big city. Each of these parallel adventures, unfolding largely without dialogue, is an exuberant love letter to a different bygone era of New York. The mystery of how they ultimately converge, which involves Julianne Moore in a lovely dual role, provides the film’s emotional core. Adapted from a young-adult novel by Hugo author Brian Selznick, Wonderstruck is an all-ages enchantment, entirely true to director Todd Haynes’s sensibility: an intelligent, deeply personal, and lovingly intricate tribute to the power of obsession. An Amazon Studios release.

Closing Night
Wonder Wheel
Dir. Woody Allen, USA, 2017
World Premiere
In a career spanning 50 years and almost as many features, Woody Allen has periodically refined, reinvented, and redefined the terms of his art, and that’s exactly what he does with his daring new film. We’re in Coney Island in the 1950s. A lifeguard (Justin Timberlake) tells us a story that just might be filtered through his vivid imagination: a middle-aged carousel operator (Jim Belushi) and his beleaguered wife (Kate Winslet), who eke out a living on the boardwalk, are visited by his estranged daughter (Juno Temple)—a situation from which layer upon layer of all-too-human complications develop. Allen and his cinematographer, the great Vittorio Storaro, working with a remarkable cast led by Winslet in a startlingly brave, powerhouse performance, have created a bracing and truly surprising movie experience. An Amazon Studios release.

Before We Vanish
Dir. Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Japan, 2017, 129m
The latest from master of art-horror Kiyoshi Kurosawa is perhaps his most mainstream film yet, a throwback to 1980s sci-fi. An advance crew of three aliens journey to Earth in preparation for a complete takeover of the planet. They snatch not only bodies but memories, beliefs, values—everything that defines their conquests as human—leaving only hollow shells, which are all but unrecognizable to their loved ones. This disturbing parable for our present moment, replete with stunning images—including a drone attack and a bit of Clockwork Orange–style murder and mayhem—is also a profoundly mystical affirmation of love as the only form of resistance and salvation. A Neon release.

BPM (Beats Per Minute)/120 battements par minute
Dir. Robin Campillo, France, 2017, 144m
U.S. Premiere
In the early 1990s, ACT UP—in France, as in the U.S.—was on the front lines of AIDS activism. Its members, mostly gay, HIV-positive men, stormed drug company and government offices in “Silence=Death” T-shirts, facing down complacent suits with the urgency of their struggle for life. Robin Campillo (Eastern Boys) depicts their comradeship and tenacity in waking up the world to the disease that was killing them and movingly dramatizes the persistence of passionate love affairs even in dire circumstances. All the actors, many of them unknown, are splendid in this film, which not only celebrates the courage of ACT UP but also tacitly provides a model of resistance to the forces of destruction running rampant today. A release of The Orchard.        

Bright Sunshine In/Un beau soleil intérieur
Dir. Claire Denis, France, 2017, 95m
North American Premiere
Juliette Binoche is both incandescent and emotionally raw in Claire Denis’s extraordinary new film as Isabelle, a middle-aged Parisian artist in search of definitive love. The film moves elliptically, as though set to some mysterious bio-rhythm, from one romantic/emotional attachment to another: from the boorish married lover (Xavier Beauvois); to the subtly histrionic actor (Nicolas Duvauchelle), also married; to the dreamboat hairdresser (Paul Blain); to the gentle man (Alex Descas) not quite ready for commitment to . . . a mysterious fortune-teller. Appropriately enough, Bright Sunshine In (very loosely inspired by Roland Barthes’s A Lover’s Discourse) feels like it’s been lit from within; it was lit from without by Denis’s longtime cinematographer Agnès Godard. It is also very funny. A Sundance Selects release.

Call Me by Your Name
Dir. Luca Guadagnino, Italy/France, 2017, 132m
A story of summer love unlike any other, the sensual new film from the director of I Am Love, set in 1983, charts the slowly ripening romance between Elio (Timothée Chalamet), an American teen on the verge of discovering himself, and Oliver (Armie Hammer), the handsome older grad student whom his professor father (Michael Stuhlbarg) has invited to their vacation home in Northern Italy. Adapted from the wistful novel by André Aciman, Call Me by Your Name is Guadagnino’s most exquisitely rendered, visually restrained film, capturing with eloquence the confusion and longing of youth, anchored by a remarkable, star-making performance by Chalamet, always a nervy bundle of swagger and insecurity, contrasting with Hammer’s stoicism. A Sony Pictures Classics release.

The Day After
Dir. Hong Sang-soo, South Korea, 2017, 92m
U.S. Premiere
Hong continues in the openly emotional register of his On the Beach at Night Alone, also showing in this year’s Main Slate. Shot in moody black and white, The Day After opens with book publisher Bongwan (Kwon Hae-hyo) fending off his wife’s heated accusations of infidelity. At the office, it’s the first day for his new assistant, Areum (Kim Min-hee), whose predecessor was Bongwan’s lover. Mistaken identity, repetition compulsion, and déjà vu figure into the narrative as the film entangles its characters across multiple timelines through an intricate geometry of desire, suspicion, and betrayal. The end result is one of Hong’s most plaintive and philosophical works.

Colesmithey.com

Faces Places/Visages villages
Dir. Agnès Varda & JR, France, 2016, 89m
The 88-year-old Agnès Varda teamed up with the 33-year-old visual artist JR for this tour of rural France that follows in the footsteps of Varda’s groundbreaking documentary The Gleaners and I (NYFF 2000) in its celebration of artisanal production, workers’ solidarity, and the photographic arts in the face of mortality. Varda and JR wielded cameras themselves, but they were also documented in their travels by multiple image and sound recordists. Out of this often spontaneous jumble, Varda and her editor Maxime Pozzi-Garcia created an unassuming masterpiece (the winner of this year’s L’Oeil d’or at Cannes) that is vivid, lyrical, and inspiringly humanistic. A Cohen Media Group release.

Félicité
Dir. Alain Gomis, France/Senegal/Belgium/Germany/Lebanon, 2017, 124m
U.S. Premiere
The new film from Alain Gomis, a French director of Guinea-Bissauan and Senegalese descent, is largely set in the roughest areas of the rough city of Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, a woman named Félicité (Véro Tshanda Beya Mputu) scrapes together a living as a singer in a makeshift bar (her accompanists are played by members of the Kasai Allstars band). When her son is seriously injured in an accident, she goes in search of money for his medical care and embarks on a double journey: through the punishing outer world of the city and the inner world of the soul. Félicité is tough, tender, lyrical, mysterious, funny, and terrifying, both responsive to the moment and fixed on its heroine’s spiritual progress. A Strand Releasing release.

The Florida Project
Dir. Sean Baker, USA, 2017, 105m
U.S. Premiere
A six-year-old girl (the remarkable Brooklynn Prince) and her two best friends run wild on the grounds of a week-by-week motel complex on the edge of Orlando’s Disney World. Meanwhile, her mother (talented novice Bria Vinaite) desperately tries to cajole the motel manager (an ever-surprising Willem Dafoe) to turn a blind eye to the way she pays the rent. A film about but not for kids, Baker’s depiction of childhood on the margins has fierce energy, tenderness, and great beauty. After the ingenuity of his iPhone-shot 2015 breakout Tangerine, Baker reasserts his commitment to 35mm film with sun-blasted images that evoke a young girl’s vision of adventure and endurance beyond heartbreak. An A24 release.

Ismael’s Ghosts/Les fantômes d’Ismaël
Dir. Arnaud Desplechin, France, 2017, 132m
North American Premiere
Phantoms swirl around Ismael (Mathieu Amalric), a filmmaker in the throes of writing a spy thriller based on the unlikely escapades of his brother, Ivan Dedalus (Louis Garrel). His only true source of stability, his relationship with Sylvia (Charlotte Gainsbourg), is upended, as is the life of his Jewish documentarian mentor and father-in-law (László Szabó), when Ismael’s wife Carlotta (Marion Cotillard), who disappeared twenty years earlier, returns, and, like one of Hitchcock’s fragile, delusional femmes fatales, expects that her husband and father are still in thrall to her. A brilliant shape-shifter—part farce, part melodrama—Ismael’s Ghosts is finally about the process of creating a work of art and all the madness required. A Magnolia Pictures release.

Lady Bird
Dir. Greta Gerwig, USA, 2017, 93m

Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut is a portrait of an artistically inclined young woman (Saoirse Ronan) trying to define herself in the shadow of her mother (Laurie Metcalf) and searching for an escape route from her hometown of Sacramento. Moods are layered upon moods at the furious pace of late adolescence in this lovely and loving film, which shifts deftly from one emotional and comic register to the next. Lady Bird is rich in invention and incident, and it is powered by Ronan, one of the finest actors in movies. With Lucas Hedges and Timothée Chalamet as the men in Lady Bird’s life, Beanie Feldstein as her best friend, and Tracy Letts as her dad. An A24 release.

Lover for a Day/L’Amant d’un jour
Dir. Philippe Garrel, France, 2017, 76m
North American Premiere
Lover for a Day is an exquisite meditation on love and fidelity that recalls Garrel's previous NYFF selections Jealousy (NYFF 2013) and In the Shadow of Women (NYFF 2015). After a painful breakup, heartbroken Jeanne (Esther Garrel) moves back in with her university professor father, Gilles (Eric Caravaca), to discover that he is living with optimistic, life-loving student Ariane (newcomer Louise Chevillotte), who is the same age as Jeanne. An unusual triangular relationship emerges as both girls seek the favor of Gilles, as daughter or lover, while developing their own friendship, finding common ground despite their differences. Gorgeously shot in grainy black and white by Renato Berta (Au revoir les enfants), Lover for a Day perfectly illustrates Garrel's poetic exploration of relationships and desire. A MUBI release.

The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)
Dir. Noah Baumbach, USA, 2017, 110m
North American Premiere
Noah Baumbach revisits the terrain of family vanities and warring attachments that he began exploring with The Squid and the Whale in this intricately plotted story of three middle-aged siblings (Adam Sandler, Ben Stiller, and Elizabeth Marvel) coping with their strong-willed father (Dustin Hoffman) and the flightiness of his wife (Emma Thompson). Baumbach’s film never stops deftly changing gears, from surges of pathos to painful comedy and back again. Needless to say, this lyrical quicksilver comedy is very much a New York experience. A Netflix release.

Colesmithey.com

Mrs. Hyde/Madame Hyde
Dir. Serge Bozon, France, 2017, 95m
North American Premiere
Serge Bozon’s eccentric comedic thriller is loosely based on Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, with many a twist. Mrs. Géquil (Isabelle Huppert), a timid and rather peculiar physics professor, teaches in a suburban technical high school. Apart from her quiet married life with her gentle stay-at-home husband, she is mocked and despised on a daily basis by pretty much everyone around her—headmaster, colleagues, students. During a dark, stormy night, she is struck by lightning and wakes up a decidedly different person, a newly powerful Mrs. Hyde with mysterious energy and uncontrollable powers. Highlighted by Bozon's brilliant mise en scène, Isabelle Huppert hypnotizes us again, securing her place as the ultimate queen of the screen.

Mudbound
Dir. Dee Rees, USA, 2017, 134m
Writer/director Dee Rees’s historical epic details daily life and social dynamics in the failing economy of Mississippi during the World War II era. Two families, one white (the landlords) and one black (the sharecroppers), work the same miserable piece of farmland. Out of need and empathy, the mothers of the two families bond as their younger male relatives go off to war and learn that there is a world beyond racial hatred and fear. The flawless ensemble cast includes Carey Mulligan, Mary J. Blige, Garrett Hedlund, Jason Mitchell, Jason Clarke, Rob Morgan, and Jonathan Banks. A Netflix release.

On the Beach at Night Alone
Dir. Hong Sang-soo, South Korea, 2017, 101m
Hong Sang-soo’s movies have always invited autobiographical readings, and his 19th feature is perhaps his most achingly personal film yet, a steel-nerved, clear-eyed response to the tabloid frenzy that erupted in South Korea over his relationship with actress Kim Min-hee. The film begins in Hamburg, where actress Young-hee (played by Kim herself, who won the Best Actress prize at Berlin for this role) is hiding out after the revelation of her affair with a married filmmaker. Back in Korea, a series of encounters shed light on Young-hee’s volatile state, as she slips in and out of melancholic reflection and dreams. Centered on Kim’s astonishingly layered performance, On the Beach at Night Alone is the work of a master mining new emotional depths. A Cinema Guild release.

The Other Side of Hope/Toivon tuolla puolen
Dir. Aki Kaurismäki, Finland, 2017, 98m
Leave it to Aki Kaurismäki (Le Havre, NYFF 2011), peerless master of humanist tragicomedy, to make the first great fiction film about the 21st century migrant crisis. Having escaped bombed-out Aleppo, Syrian refugee Khlaed (Sherwan Haji) seeks asylum in Finland, only to get lost in a maze of functionaries and bureaucracies. Meanwhile, shirt salesman Wikström (Sakari Kuosmanen) leaves his wife, wins big in a poker game, and takes over a restaurant whose deadpan staff he also inherits. These parallel stories dovetail to gently comic and enormously moving effect in Kaurismäki’s politically urgent fable, an object lesson on the value of compassion and hope that remains grounded in a tangible social reality. A Janus Films release.

The Rider
Dir. Chloé Zhao, USA, 2017, 104m
The hardscrabble economy of America’s rodeo country, where, for some, riding and winning is the only source of pleasure and income, is depicted with exceptional compassion and truth by a filmmaker who is in no way an insider: Zhao was born in Beijing and educated at Mount Holyoke and NYU. Set on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, The Rider is a fiction film that calls on nonprofessional actors to play characters similar to themselves, incorporating their skill sets and experiences. Brady Jandreau is extraordinary as a badly injured former champion rider and horse trainer forced to give up the life he knows and loves. A Sony Pictures Classics release.

Spoor/Pokot
Dir. Agnieszka Holland, in cooperation with Kasia Adamik, Poland/Germany/Czech Republic, 2017, 128m
U.S. Premiere
Janina Duszejko (Agnieszka Mandat) is a vigorous former engineer, part-time teacher, and animal activist, living in a near wilderness on the Polish-Czech border, where hunting is the favored year-round sport of the corrupt men who rule the region. When a series of hunters die mysteriously, Janina wonders if the animals are taking revenge, which doesn’t stop the police from coming after her. A brilliant, passionate director, Agnieszka Holland—who like Janina comes from a generation that learned to fight authoritarianism by any means necessary—forges a sprawling, wildly beautiful, emotionally enveloping film that earns its vision of utopia. It’s at once a phantasmagorical murder mystery, a tender, late-blooming love story, and a resistance and rescue thriller.

Colesmithey.com

The Square
Dir. Ruben Östlund, Sweden, 2017, 150m
A precisely observed, thoroughly modern comedy of manners, Ruben Östlund’s Palme d’Or–winner revolves around Christian (Claes Bang), a well-heeled contemporary art curator at a Stockholm museum. While preparing his new exhibit—a four-by-four-meter zone designated as a “sanctuary of trust and caring”—Christian falls prey to a pickpocketing scam, which triggers an overzealous response and then a crisis of conscience. Featuring several instant-classic scenes and a vivid supporting cast (Elisabeth Moss, Dominic West, and noted motion-capture actor Terry Notary), The Square is the most ambitious film yet by one of contemporary cinema’s most incisive social satirists, the rare movie to have as many laughs as ideas. A Magnolia Pictures release.

Thelma
Dir. Joachim Trier, Norway/Sweden/France, 2017, 116m
In the new film from Joachim Trier (Reprise), an adolescent country girl (Eili Harboe) has just moved to the city to begin her university studies, with the internalized religious severity of her quietly domineering mother and father (Ellen Dorrit Petersen and Henrik Rafaelsen) always in mind. When she realizes that she is developing an attraction to her new friend Anja (Okay Kaya), she begins to manifest a terrifying and uncontrollable power that her parents have long feared. To reveal more would be a crime; let’s just say that this fluid, sharply observant, and continually surprising film begins in the key of horror and ends somewhere completely different. A release of The Orchard.

Western
Dir. Valeska Grisebach, Germany and Bulgaria, 2017, 119m
U.S. Premiere
As its title suggests, German director Valeska Grisebach’s first feature in a decade is a supremely intelligent genre update that recognizes the Western as a template on which to draw out eternal human conflicts. In remote rural Bulgaria, a group of German workers are building a water facility. Meinhard (Meinhard Neumann), the reserved newbie in this all-male company, immediately draws the ire of the boorish team leader, not least for his willingness to mingle with the wary locals. Cast with utterly convincing nonprofessional actors, Western is a gripping culture-clash drama, attuned both to old codes of masculinity and new forms of colonialism. A Cinema Guild release.

Zama
Dir. Lucrecia Martel, Argentina/Brazil/Spain, 2017, 115m
U.S. Premiere
The great Lucrecia Martel ventures into the realm of historical fiction and makes the genre entirely her own in this adaptation of Antonio di Benedetto’s 1956 classic of Argentinean literature. In the late 18th century, in a far-flung corner of what seems to be Paraguay, the title character, an officer of the Spanish crown (Daniel Giménez Cacho) born in the Americas, waits in vain for a transfer to a more prestigious location. Martel renders Zama’s world—his daily regimen of small humiliations and petty politicking—as both absurd and mysterious, and as he increasingly succumbs to lust and paranoia, subject to a creeping disorientation. Precise yet dreamlike, and thick with atmosphere, Zama is a singular and intoxicating experience, a welcome return from one of contemporary cinema’s truly brilliant minds.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from Shutterstock, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. American Airlines is the Official Airline of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. 

Support for the New York Film Festival is generously provided by Official Partner HBO® and The New York Times, Benefactor Partners Verizon, FilmStruck, The Village Voice, Dolby, and illy caffé, Hospitality Partners Loews Regency New York and RowNYC, and Supporting Partners MUBI, Fiji Water, Manhattan Portage. WABC-7, WNET New York Public Media, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter, Deadline Hollywood, JCDecaux, and The Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment serve as Media Sponsors.

For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

July 31, 2017

JANE CAMPION'S OWN STORIES AT FSLC

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER ANNOUNCES JANE CAMPION’S OWN STORIES, SEPTEMBER 8-17 

 Retrospective includes the director’s complete feature filmography plus restored shorts  

Campion in person for a special conversation and sneak preview of Top of the Lake: China Girl


Bright Star / The Piano

New York, NY (July 31, 2017) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces Jane Campion’s Own Stories, a retrospective of the groundbreaking filmmaker’s rich and revelatory body of work, September 8-17.

Since her indelible 1989 theatrical feature debut Sweetie, New Zealand–born Jane Campion has been one of the most distinctive talents in world cinema. The first woman awarded the Palme d’Or at Cannes—for her Oscar-winning 1993 feature The Piano—Campion makes films that reflect a highly personal and idiosyncratic style, influenced by her background in anthropology and painting and notable for their visual inventiveness, dark sense of humor, and complex depictions of women and sexuality. For four decades now, Campion has moved freely across genres—family melodrama (Sweetie), gothic romance (The Piano), literary adaptation (An Angel at My Table, The Portrait of a Lady), farce (Holy Smoke), suspense-thriller (In the Cut)—as well as between cinema and television.

Coinciding with the U.S. premiere of Campion’s eagerly awaited series Top of the Lake: China Girl on SundanceTV this September, the Film Society presents a retrospective survey of the director’s work, including her complete feature filmography, entirely on celluloid; her underseen made-for-television first feature Two Friends on 16mm; a program of short films, including three restored early works and two recent ones; and a free marathon screening of the first installment of Top of the Lake held in the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center’s Amphitheater.

The filmmaker will appear in person for two special events: An Evening with Jane Campion, a career-spanning discussion to kick off the series on Friday, September 8, and a sneak preview of the first two episodes of Top of the Lake: China Girlon Saturday, September 9, featuring a post-screening Q&A with Campion and series co-creator Gerard Lee.

Tickets go on sale August 24, with an early access period for Film Society Members beginning August 22, and are $14; $11 for students and seniors (62+); and $9 for Film Society members. See more and save with the 3+ film discount package. Note: Special pricing may apply to select events. Learn more at filmlinc.org.

Organized by Dennis Lim and Tyler Wilson.

Jane Campion’s Own Stories is sponsored by SundanceTV. Top of the Lake: China Girl premieres as a 3-night special event starting September 10.

Acknowledgments:
SundanceTV; See-Saw Films; BBC Worldwide; Australian Film, Television and Radio School; National Film & Sound Archive of Australia; Chicago Film Society; Yale Film Study Center; Kate Richter.

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS
All films screen at the Walter Reade Theater (165 West 65th Street) unless otherwise noted. 

Colesmithey.com

An Angel at My Table
New Zealand/Australia/UK/USA, 1990, 35mm, 158m
Based on the autobiography of Janet Frame, Campion’s clear-eyed, sprawling feature—initially produced as a television miniseries—depicts the life of New Zealand’s most acclaimed author, who spent eight years hospitalized after a mistaken schizophrenia diagnosis. Divided into three sections, Frame’s story is told through different actresses (Alexia Keogh, Karen Fergusson, and Kerry Fox—each sublime and uncannily matched) who inhabit various ages of the writer’s life, from her childhood in prewar New Zealand, to her introverted adolescence and harrowing years around her institutionalization, to her literary success and experiences around the world. Intricate in its representation of time and interiority, An Angel at My Table is an unsentimental yet emotionally intense portrait of the artist as both narrator and subject. An NYFF28 selection. Print courtesy of the National Film & Sound Archive, Australia.
Sunday, September 10, 3:00pm
Saturday, September 16, 4:00pm

Bright Star
UK/Australia/France, 2009, 35mm, 119m
Campion’s latest feature film is a quietly tender love story as well as a devastating portrait of an artist beset by tragedy. During the last few years of the fledgling poet's tragic life, John Keats (Ben Whishaw) is introduced to Fanny Brawne (Abbie Cornish) in London, 1818. Although the two embark on a passionate courtship—to the dismay of others in their circle, including Keats’s friend and writing associate Charles Brown (Paul Schneider)—their vibrant love affair is nonetheless shaded by imminent heartbreak. With Greig Fraser’s delicate cinematography, longtime Campion collaborator Janet Brown’s sophisticated production design (The PianoThe Portrait of a Lady), and the vivacious chemistry between the film’s accomplished young leads, Bright Star is Campion’s most romantic film to date.
Monday, September 11, 6:30pm
Sunday, September 17, 8:00pm

Holy Smoke
USA/Australia, 1999, 35mm, 115m
Kate Winslet and Harvey Keitel turn in brave performances in this madcap comedy of the sexes, written by Jane and her sister Anna Campion (to whom Sweetie is dedicated). After falling under the sway of a cultish guru in India, Ruth Barron (Winslet) is deceived by her parents to return home so that she can be deprogrammed by world-renowned “exit counselor” PJ Waters (Keitel). Something between a therapist and a mercenary, Waters travels halfway around the world and takes Ruth into the Australian bush to interrogate, question, and break down everything she believes—but what begins as a debate over spiritual ideals spirals into a role reversal that must be seen to be believed. Holy Smoke was Campion’s most unusual film since Sweetie: a funny and hallucinatory critique of patriarchal civility, but one whose message is ultimately humanist. An NYFF37 selection.
Sunday, September 10, 9:00pm
Friday, September 15, 6:30pm

In the Cut
USA/UK/Australia, 2003, 35mm, 119m
Based on the novel by Susanna Moore and produced by Nicole Kidman, In the Cut renders the erotic thriller with a haunting, meditative gaze. After learning about the brutal murder of a young woman in her neighborhood, English professor Frannie Avery (Meg Ryan, in a powerful and uncharacteristic role) begins an affair with one of the investigating police detectives, Giovanni Malloy (Mark Ruffalo). As their relationship becomes increasingly passionate, Frannie questions Malloy’s suspicious role in the investigation, and uses sexual desire as a tool for defense and titillation. Framing noughties New York with a soft amber glow and subjective visual style, In the Cut knowingly investigates the means of perception—obscuring, among other archetypes, the line between female victim and femme fatale.
Friday, September 15, 9:00pm
Sunday, September 17, 2:30pm

The Piano
New Zealand/Australia/France, 1993, 35mm, 121m
Campion became the first female director to win the Palme d’Or at Cannes for this singularly haunting and beautiful tale, suffused with her anthropological, literary, and surrealist impulses. In the 19th century, mute Scotswoman Ada and her young daughter (Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin, who both won Oscars for their roles) move to remote coastal New Zealand to meet her new husband, Stewart (Sam Neill). After he sells her beloved piano—her preferred means of communication—to Baines (Harvey Keitel), Stewart’s employee and a local eccentric, Ada agrees to repossess her property through sexual favors. A mysterious and subdued romance as well as a fearless depiction of power and sexuality, The Piano announced to audiences worldwide the boldly original talent already on display in Sweetie and An Angel at My Table. An NYFF31 selection. Print Courtesy of the Yale Film Study Center.
Sunday, September 10, 6:00pm
Saturday, September 16, 9:00pm

The Portrait of a Lady
UK/USA, 1996, 35mm, 144m
As early as its opening credit sequence, this interpretation of Henry James’s masterwork insinuates a modern, tactile, and perceptive vision that is entirely Campion’s. Nicole Kidman stars as the resolute young American, Isabel Archer, who rejects a proposal from her English cousin (Richard E. Grant) and falls prey to the schemes of two American expatriates, the independent and worldly Madame Merle (Barbara Hershey) and Gilbert Osmond (John Malkovich), a dilettante artist with little means but enough cunning to woo Isabel. Sumptuously photographed and exceedingly intelligent, The Portrait of a Lady is a cinematic fever dream fascinated by the pictorial and sensuous forms of dominance within James’s text, and the inextricable bond between romantic love and violence.
Friday, September 8, 9:00pm
Sunday, September 17, 5:00pm

Shorts: 1982-2007 (TRT: 70m)
An Exercise in Discipline: Peel
Australia, 1982, 9m
A father, his son, and sister grow increasingly hostile toward one another after an orange peel is tossed out a car window. Winner of the Cannes Film Festival’s Palme d’Or for Best Short Film in 1986.
Passionless Moments
Australia, 1983, 13m
An omniscient narrator recounts a series of brief, droll vignettes around a neighborhood in Sydney.
A Girl’s Own Story
Australia, 1984, 27m
Campion’s final student film follows the disquieting familial and social encounters of three adolescent girls—Pam, Stella, and Gloria—in 1960s Australia.  
The Water Diary
Australia/France, 2006, 18m
Produced for the 2008 anthology film 8 about the United Nations' eight Millennium Development Goals, The Water Diaryis a mystical vision of a family living through a drought in the Australian outback.
The Lady Bug
France, 2007, 3m
A woman dressed like an insect tries to dance while a cleaning man tries to kill her. Made for the collective film To Each His Own Cinema to celebrate the 60th Anniversary of the Cannes Film Festival.
Tuesday, September 12, 7:00pm*
Thursday, September 14, 9:00pm*
*Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Francesca Beale Theater, 144 West 65th Street

Sweetie
Australia, 1989, 35mm, 97m
If Campion’s Palme d’Or–winning short An Exercise in Discipline: Peel announced a promising new voice in cinema, Sweetie found the filmmaker in full command of her descriptive, surrealist visual style and iconoclastic sense of humor. Co-written by Gerard Lee (Top of the Lake), this bleakly funny and profoundly unsettling film is centered around a pair of dysfunctional sisters in Sydney, Australia: Kay (Karen Colston), a repressed and superstitious twenty-something woman who still lives at home, and the unhinged, domineering Sweetie (Geneviève Lemon), who returns and disturbs the family dynamic. Gradually, the reasons for the sisters’ peculiar adult behavior come into focus. Vibrantly photographed by Sally Bongers, Sweetie depicts Australian suburbia and its residents as both simultaneously mundane and menacing, ludicrous and moving, comical and disturbing. An NYFF27 selection. Print courtesy of the Chicago Film Society.
Saturday, September 9, 9:30pm
Monday, September 11, 9:00pm
Saturday, September 16, 7:00pm

Two Friends
Australia, 1986, 16mm, 76m
A coming-of-age story told in reverse, Campion’s underseen first feature (written by renowned Australian novelist Helen Garner) delicately renders femininity and adolescence through the depiction of two girls’ unraveling friendship. Kris Bidenko and Emma Coles deliver nuanced debut performances as Kelly and Louise, 15-year-olds whose relationship has already ended at the film’s start. Moving backwards from there, Campion reveals—in a manner both tragic and deceptively optimistic—the fleeting moments of the past year that suggest how, where, and when the girls’ paths diverged. Originally made for television, Two Friends screened at the 1986 Cannes Film Festival along with three of Campion’s student films, An Exercise in Discipline: PeelPassionless Moments, and A Girl’s Own Story.
Tuesday, September 12, 9:00pm*
Thursday, September 14, 7:00pm*
*Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Francesca Beale Theater, 144 West 65th Street

SPECIAL EVENTS

Conversation
An Evening with Jane Campion (TRT approx. 90m)
In anticipation of Top of the Lake: China Girl—a highlight at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, airing on SundanceTV starting in September—Jane Campion will join us at the Film Society of Lincoln Center for a special onstage conversation spanning her entire career, featuring excerpts from her acclaimed crime series as well as her features and short films. She will discuss the work that has inspired and influenced her career and take questions from the audience.
Friday, September 8, 7:00pm

Sneak Preview
Top of the Lake: China Girl (episodes 1 & 2)
Jane Campion & Ariel Kleiman, UK/Australia/New Zealand/USA, 2017, approx. 120m
Elisabeth Moss reprises her Golden Globe–winning role as Detective Robin Griffin in the second installment of Campion and co-creator Gerard Lee’s acclaimed miniseries, which also features fresh characters played by Nicole Kidman and Gwendoline Christie. Four years after the traumatic events of 2013’s Top of the Lake, Robin struggles with her past while attempting to find normalcy following a break up with her fiancé and the police force. The remote landscape of Laketop, New Zealand, has been exchanged for the urban congestion of Sydney, home to Robin’s latest case, concerning a pregnant corpse found washed ashore. Following the series’ acclaimed premiere at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, the Film Society of Lincoln Center is pleased to present a sneak preview of the new season’s first two episodes, directed by Campion and Ariel Kleiman. A SundanceTV release.
Saturday, September 9, 6:30pm (Q&A with Jane Campion and Gerard Lee)

Free Screening
Top of the Lake
Jane Campion & Garth Davis, New Zealand, 2013, 342m
Elisabeth Moss stars in this thrilling, seven-episode television series, perhaps the toughest, wildest drama Campion has ever made. With its vast, primal setting and six-hour time frame, Top of the Lake is episodic television as epic poem, the Trojan War recast as gender battle. Moss plays a detective who has returned to the bleak rural town where she grew up in order to spend time with her dying mother, and is soon recruited by the sole local police officer (David Wenham) to investigate a case of statutory rape. The 12-year-old victim refuses to disclose who got her pregnant, but there are no lack of suspects. The themes that underscore Campion’s films are all here, particularly the fear that bedevils female agency: of making bad, even deadly, choices in matters of sex and love.
Saturday, September 9, 12:00pm*
*Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from Shutterstock, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. American Airlines is the Official Airline of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

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