1740 posts categorized "Film"

March 20, 2018

MARCH PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
MARCH PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes five films by Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 
Adventures in Moviegoing with Rebecca Miller, and Ronald Bronstein's Frownland!
 
Monday, March 19
Meet the Filmmakers: Apichatpong Weerasethakul

In the latest entry of Meet the Filmmakers, Canadian actor and filmmaker Connor Jessup profiles Apichatpong Weerasethakul, a maverick of Thai cinema who explores the slippery nature of time and consciousness with a sublimely idiosyncratic, often surreal approach to film form. Shot in the Colombian jungle, where Apichatpong was scouting locations last year for his next project, this rare glimpse at the director's creative world delves into the dreams and desires that fuel his work. Along with the documentary, the Criterion Channel presents a sampling of his films, including Mysterious Object at Noon (2000), Tropical Malady (2004), 
Syndromes and a Century (2006), the Cannes award-winningUncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010), and Cemetery of Splendor (2015).
 
Tuesday, March 20
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Colour of His Hair* and Victim

These stirring indictments of social oppression explore a shameful period in British history when homosexuality was forbidden by law. Based on an unrealized script written in 1964 for the Homosexual Law Reform Society, an organization that campaigned for the decriminalization of sexual relations between men, Sam Ashby's 2017 short The Colour of His Hair offers an impressionistic portrait of a turbulent era through a mix of narrative and documentary techniques. Ashby's film is paired with an essential document from that era, Basil Dearden's 1961 Victim, which stars Dirk Bogarde as a member of a large group of closeted London men who become targets of a blackmailer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, March 21
Harlan County USA: Edition #334

Barbara Kopple's Oscar-winning Harlan County USA unflinchingly documents a grueling coal miners' strike in a small Kentucky town. With unprecedented access, Kopple and her crew captured the miners' sometimes violent struggles with strikebreakers, local police, and company thugs. Featuring a haunting soundtrack-with legendary country and bluegrass artists Hazel Dickens, Merle Travis, Sarah Gunning, and Florence Reece-the film is a heartbreaking record of the thirteen-month struggle between a community fighting to survive and a corporation dedicated to the bottom line. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Kopple and editor Nancy Baker; The Making of "Harlan County, USA," a documentary featuring interviews with Kopple, crew members and strike participants featured in the film; a video interview with legendary bluegrass singer-songwriter Hazel Dickens; never-before-seen outtakes from the film; and more.
 
Thursday, March 22
Art-House America: Northwest Film Forum, Seattle, Washington 

All around the country, in big cities and small towns, independent art-house theaters are thriving hubs of moviegoing, each with its own story to tell. With this series, Criterion goes wherever film culture is happening and brings back brief documentary portraits of different local art houses along with a selection of films handpicked by their programmers. The latest episode pays a visit to Seattle's Northwest Film Forum, where an innovative team, led by programmer and executive director Courtney Sheehan, has turned a grassroots movie theater into a vibrant venue for a wide range of visual culture, as well as live events, education initiatives, and political activism. The NWFF demonstrates the exciting possibilities of cinema as a folk art that can engage directly with the community, and its diverse programs have included showcases of Philippine cinema and films by local and indigenous filmmakers. The first entry in an ongoing series that NWFF will be programming on the Channel is Robinson Devor's 2005 Police Beat*, a disarmingly surreal portrait of a West African immigrant who finds work in Seattle as a bicycle cop. Also available on the Channel are the previous episodes in the series, celebrating the Walter Reade Theater, in New York City, and the Gold Town Nickelodeon, in Juneau, Alaska.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
Friday, March 23
Friday Night Double Feature: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and A Married Couple
 
Marriage becomes an emotional battleground in these tightly focused studies of domestic discord. In 1966, Mike Nichols made his debut as a film director by bringing Edward Albee's Broadway sensation to the screen, with celebrity couple Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton taking on the venomous leading roles. Allan King's "actuality drama" A Married Couple (1969) is a revealing documentary about Billy and Antoinette Edwards, ex-bohemians struggling with the demands of marriage and the changing gender roles of the 1960s. Jaw-droppingly intense in its examination of marital conflict, King's film finds just as much drama in a real couple's daily life as Nichols does in Albee's play.
 
Monday, March 26
Observations on Film Art No. 17: Narrative Motifs in Chungking Express

Wong Kar-wai's Chungking Express(1994) captures the whiplash rhythms and tenuous connections of urban life in a bifurcated story that follows two heartsick Hong Kong cops (Takeshi Kaneshiro and Tony Leung) who cross paths at the Midnight Express take-out restaurant stand, where the ethereal pixie waitress Faye (Faye Wong) works. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at how great filmmakers use cinematic devices and techniques, scholar David Bordwell isolates the recurring motifs that wind throughout the film and shows how Wong uses them to unite the story's seemingly unrelated halves.
  
Monday, March 26
Frownland*
Since its under-the-radar release in 2007, Ronald Bronstein's directorial debut has become a touchstone of contemporary independent cinema, admired by a generation of young filmmakers and winning rapturous praise from influential publications like Cahiers du cinéma for its uncompromising vision. Centering on the cringeworthy misadventures of a neurotic and staggeringly inarticulate coupon salesman (a remarkable Dore Mann), this character study is a bleak but unforgettable New York story-one that anticipates later works by filmmakers such as Josh and Benny Safdie, with whom Bronstein has gone on to collaborate as an actor and writer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, March 27
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Lira's Forest* and Tropical Malady

Animal spirits enact rituals of love and death in this pair of sylvan fables by the director and the subject of this month's new Meet the Filmmakers episode, Connor Jessup and Apichatpong Weerasethakul. Jessup's short Lira's Forest (2017) follows an ailing woman who receives a visit from a mysterious spirit and undergoes an otherworldly transformation. Apichatpong's
Tropical Malady(2004) follows the tender romance that blossoms between two young men in the Thai countryside, then plunges into the jungle where their love story is reconfigured as the tale of a hunter's search for a legendary tiger. Also on the Channel, Jessup, a devoted student of Apichatpong's beguiling approach to cinema, profiles the Thai master in this month's installment of Meet the Filmmakers.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, March 28
The Passion of Joan of Arc: Edition #62

Spiritual rapture and institutional hypocrisy come to stark, vivid life in one of the most transcendent masterpieces of the silent era. Chronicling the trial of Joan of Arc in the hours leading up to her execution, Danish master Carl Theodor Dreyer depicts her torment with startling immediacy, employing an array of techniques-expressionistic lighting, interconnected sets, painfully intimate close-ups-to immerse viewers in her subjective experience. Anchoring Dreyer's audacious formal experimentation is a legendary performance by Renée Falconetti, whose haunted face channels both the agony and the ecstasy of martyrdom.
SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: three scores: Richard Einhorn's Voices of Light, one by Goldfrapp's Will Gregory and Portishead's Adrian Utley, and one by composer and pianist Mie Yanashita; an audio commentary from 1999 by film scholar Casper Tybjerg; an interview from 1995 with actor Renée Falconetti's daughter and biographer, Hélène Falconetti; and more.

Thursday, March 29
Adventures in Moviegoing with Rebecca Miller
 
Filmmaker, visual artist, actor, and novelist Rebecca Miller sat down with us to share a personal history of moviegoing that stretches back to childhood. Miller's parents, playwright Arthur Miller and photographer Inge Morath, initiated her into art-house cinema at an early age, fostering the eclectic taste that would go on to inform her creative life. Miller is fascinated with movies that stay anchored in emotional realism while violating the codes of naturalism. Here she explains how her work in various art forms has influenced her filmmaking, and selects a series of favorites that speak to her abiding interest in evoking psychic states on-screen, including John Cassavetes's Opening Night, Agnès Varda's Vagabond, and Jane Campion's Sweetie.
 
Thursday, March 29
By Rebecca Miller

The subject of this month's Adventures in Moviegoing, writer-director Rebecca Miller transitioned from visual art to filmmaking with her 1995 directorial debut, Angela*, a haunting tale of a young girl who retreats into her fantasies to cope with her emotionally volatile mother. Miller's vivid evocations of complex psychological states are a hallmark of her subsequent features, including the 2005 drama The Ballad of Jack and Rose*, a devastating look at the twilight of the 1960s counterculture in which Daniel Day-Lewis plays a Scottish farmer whose discovery of new love throws his intensely close relationship with his teenage daughter into chaos.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, March 30
Friday Night Double Feature: The Phantom of Liberty and Tampopo

When Juzo Itami set out to make a movie about human appetite and culinary culture, he couldn't figure out how to string together the episodes he had imagined, until he remembered The Phantom of Liberty, which struck him as "the kind of film where the last thing of the scene before leads to the next event-that kind of quick-change thing." Luis Buñuel's penultimate film is an audacious satire of bourgeois norms, from the hypocrisy of conventional morality to the arbitrariness of social arrangements, as told through a series of non sequiturs. Inspired by Buñuel's "quick-change" structure, Itami interspersed the story of Tampopo's eponymous heroine with the erotic exploits of a gastronome gangster and a string of standalone skits, spicing the broth of his "ramen western" with comic flavor.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

March 6
Art, Adrian Sitaru, 2014
 
March 13
Home, Daniel Mulloy, 2016
 
March 14
Science Is Fiction: 23 Films by Jean Painlevé
 
March 19
Frownland, Ronald Bronstein, 2007
 
March 20
The Colour of His Hair, Sam Ashby, 2017
 
March 22
Police Beat, Robinson Devor, 2005
 
March 27
Lira's Forest, Connor Jessup, 2017
 
March 29
Angela, Rebecca Miller, 1995
The Ballad of Jack and Rose, Rebecca Miller, 2005
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ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. 

ABOUT FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck is a subscription on-demand service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive and constantly refreshed library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary arthouse, indie, foreign, cult and classic Hollywood films. FilmStruck is the exclusive streaming home to the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.
ABOUT THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium-from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to FilmStruck, the streaming service developed in collaboration with Turner Classic Movies - Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer's appreciation of the art of film.

February 10, 2018

Good weather on Mon. Tues. Wed. to see NYC on Cole's "5th & Park" Walking Tour

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Monday 2/13, Tuesday 2/14, and Wednesday 2/5 promise ideal weather for my film and fiction walking tour of beautiful Carnegie Hill! A visit inside Central Park is on the list. 

There is much great culture to savor in Carnegie Hill, one of the country's oldest, and most architecturally rich neighborhoods. The tour combines Central Park, Museum Mile, lush mansions, celebrity homes, and countless filming locations — not to mention the chance of seeing a celebrity on the tour! Stranger things have happened on the rewarding streets of Carnegie Hill. 

5thAndPark_Horizontal

December 10, 2017

BILL FRISELL: A PORTRAIT — TRAILER

Bill Frisell, A Portrait - Trailer from Emma Franz on Vimeo.

Bill is my favorite guitarist. In you're in NYC, get down to the IFC Center and catch this promising documentary!

PATREON BUTTON

December 06, 2017

Wes Anderson's 'ISLE OF DOGS' OPENS BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL

Wes Anderson’s stop-motion animated film ‘Isle of Dogs’ (featuring the voices of Bryan Cranston and Tilda Swinton) will premiere at the 2018 BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL on February 15. From the trailer, this looks like vintage Wes Anderson — kooky dry humor with an international bent of globalization. Yum. 

Isleofdogs

PATREON BUTTON

December 04, 2017

NEW BROADCAST TIME FOR THE 90TH OSCARS®

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

 THE COUNTDOWN BEGINS: 90 DAYS TO OSCAR® SUNDAY

NEW BROADCAST TIME FOR THE 90TH OSCARS®
LIVE SUNDAY, MARCH 4, AT 8 PM EST/5 PM PST ON ABC

The Oscars Pre-Show Will Kick Off the Night’s Festivities at 6:30 p.m. EST/3:30 p.m. PST

First Look at New 90th Oscars Promo 

ABC and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today the 90th Oscars® telecast on Sunday, March 4, 2018, will now begin at 8:00 p.m. EST/5:00 p.m. PST, a half-hour earlier than prior telecasts. As previously announced, late-night talk show favorite Jimmy Kimmel will return to host, and Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd will return to produce.

Additionally, starting at 6:30 p.m. EST/3:30 p.m. PST, the Oscars Pre-Show returns to give fans exclusive, insider access to all the excitement of the red carpet. The 90-minute special features interviews with nominees, presenters and performers, and brings viewers the best behind-the-scenes moments. ABC and the Academy also released a first look at the 90th Oscars with a promo celebrating the season. To view the promo and download additional assets, click here.

The 90th Oscars will be held on Sunday, March 4, 2018, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center®in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network. The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

About the Academy
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 8,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which is under construction in Los Angeles.

About ABC Entertainment
ABC Entertainment airs compelling programming across all day parts, with new shows including fall’s No. 1 new drama, “The Good Doctor”; as well as “Kevin (Probably) Saves the World” and “The Mayor”; and current hits such as groundbreaking dramas “Designated Survivor,” “Quantico,” “Scandal” “How to Get Away with Murder,” “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and “Once Upon a Time.” The ABC Television Network is also home to the Emmy® Award-winning “Modern Family” and trailblazing comedy favorites “black-ish,” “American Housewife,” “Fresh Off the Boat,” “The Goldbergs,” “The Middle” and “Speechless”; hit game shows “$100,000 Pyramid,” “Celebrity Family Feud,” “Match Game” and “To Tell the Truth”; reality phenomenon “Shark Tank,” iconic “The Bachelor” franchise, long-running hits “Dancing with the Stars” and “America’s Funniest Home Videos,” and the return of “American Idol”; “General Hospital,” which has aired for over 50 years on the network, along with daytime talk show “The Chew”; and late-night talk show “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” The network also boasts some of television’s most prestigious awards shows, including “The Oscars®,” “The CMA Awards” and “The American Music Awards.”

November 30, 2017

Ask Jim Jarmusch a Question!

 
Ask Jim Jarmusch
 
Criterion's popular Q&A series with director Jim Jarmusch is back!
A special edition of Jarmusch's Dead Man is currently in the works,
will feature a new 4K restoration and is slated to be released in 2018.
 

The Criterion Collection is currently working on the special edition of Jarmusch's Dead Man, which will feature a new 4K restoration and is slated to be released in 2018, and is wondering if fans have any questions that they would like answered about the film.
 
Criterion will be accepting all of your questions from fans from now until December 8 and sending the most thoughtful and creative ones to Jim. Though they cannot guarantee that all will be answered on the release, feel free to ask as many as you like. Personal requests will not be answered.
 
Now ask away! Just make sure to include your full name, city, state, and country of residence with your questions.

November 29, 2017

DECEMBER PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
Includes Godzilla and fourteen other kaiju classics,
Aki Kaurismäki's Le Havre, and Nagisa Oshima's Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence!

Friday, December 1
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World*: Criterion Collection Edition #692

Stanley Kramer followed his harrowing Oscar winner Judgment at Nuremberg with the most grandly harebrained movie ever made, a pileup of slapstick and borscht-belt-y one-liners about a group of strangers fighting tooth and nail over buried treasure. Performed by a nonpareil cast, including Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Ethel Merman, Mickey Rooney, Spencer Tracy, Jonathan Winters, and a boatload of other playing-to-the-rafters comedy legends, Kramer's wildly uncharacteristic film is an exhilarating epic of tomfoolery. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary featuring It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World aficionados Mark Evanier, Michael Schlesinger, and Paul Scrabo; a documentary on the film's visual and sound effects, featuring interviews with visual-effects specialist Craig Barron and sound designer Ben Burtt; an excerpt from a 1974 talk show hosted by director Stanley Kramer and featuring Mad World actors Sid Caesar, Buddy Hackett, and Jonathan Winters; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, December 1
Friday Night Double Feature: Dodsworth and David Golder

Private woes take their toll on two successful self-made businessmen in this pair of domestic dramas from the 1930s. In William Wyler's Oscar-winning adaptation of Sinclair Lewis's Dodsworth (1936), Walter Huston stars as a Midwestern auto magnate who retires and embarks on a European voyage with his wannabe-chic wife, only to find that the two of them are growing further and further apart. In Julien Duviver's first sound film, the moody melodrama David Golder (1931), Harry Baur plays a ruthless banker grappling with business and family troubles.
 
Monday, December 4
A Night to Remember: Criterion Collection Edition #7

On April 14, 1912, just before midnight, the "unsinkable" Titanic struck an iceberg, plunging to the bottom of the sea and taking with it more than 1,500 of its 2,200 passengers. In his unforgettable render­ing of Walter Lord's book, British director Roy Ward Baker depicts with sensitivity, awe, and a fine sense of tragedy the ship's last hours. Featuring remarkably restrained performances, A Night to Remember (1958) is cinema's subtlest and best dramatization of this monumental twentieth-century catastrophe. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Don Lynch and Ken Marschall, author and illustrator of "Titanic": An Illustrated History; The Making of "A Night to Remember"(1993), a sixty-minute documentary featuring producer William MacQuitty's rare behind-the-scenes footage; an archival interview with Titanic survivor Eva Hart; and more.
 
Monday, December 4
Masterclass: Kenneth Turan and Marcel Ophuls on Disagreeable Truths

Marcel Ophuls talks to Los Angeles Times critic Kenneth Turan at UCLA about why and how he moved from making commercial feature films to chronicling occupied Europe and the Holocaust in epic documentaries like The Sorrow and the Pity and The Memory of Justice. Along the way, he also opens up about everything from his interview techniques and his experience as a second-generation auteur (the son of Max) to his thoughts on assessing guilt and responsibility for genocide and war crimes. Previous entries in our Masterclass series include conversations between Kirsten Johnson and Michael Moore and Alex Ross Perry and Robert Greene.
 
Tuesday, December 5
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Above and Cameraperson

With a keen eye for landscape and character, Kirsten Johnson's work documents political turmoil throughout the globe, calling into question the ethical stakes of nonfiction filmmaking. In The Above (2015), a mysterious surveillance blimp with unknown capabilities hovers above Kabul as the Afghans below go about their daily lives. In her breakthrough feature, Cameraperson (2016), she assembles footage captured throughout her twenty-five-year career, weaving together intimate moments from her private life with haunting images from her journeys abroad as a documentary cinematographer.
 
Wednesday, December 6
Le Havre: Criterion Collection Edition #619

With Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki returning to theaters this winter with his latest, The Other Side of Hope, we're revisiting his acclaimed previous film, which initiated his ongoing exploration of global migration and displacement. In this warmhearted comic yarn, fate throws a young African refugee into the path of a kindly old bohemian who shines shoes for a living in a French harbor city. A political fairy tale that exists somewhere between the reality of contemporary France and the classic French cinema of the past, Le Havre (2011) is a charming, deadpan delight and one of the director's finest films. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an interview with actor André Wilms; footage from the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, including a press conference and a French television interview with cast and crew; and more.
 
Thursday, December 7
Laughter First!: Harold Lloyd's Glasses Character Turns 100

Celebrate the centennial of Harold Lloyd's "Glasses Character" - the resourceful go-getter who always got the girl - with Kevin Brownlow and David Gill's lucid and entertaining documentary Harold Lloyd: The Third Genius. Crisply narrated by Lindsay Anderson, the film traces the performer's development all the way back to his early dramatic days and through his slapstick experiments, until he puts on horn-rimmed glasses and invents the figure who would go on to define his career. Brownlow and Gill pay exuberant tribute to the great silent clown, who was as wildly innovative as Buster Keaton and as skilled with sentiment as Chaplin, but had a resilience of his own that fit America's roaring twenties better than any other screen personality. The Third Genius streams alongside a selection of Lloyd's films: Safety Last! (1923), Girl Shy (1924), The Freshman (1925), The Kid Brother(1927), and Speedy (1928).
 
Friday, December 8
Friday Night Double Feature: The Stunt Man and 

Film sets become hazy frontiers between illusion and reality in these dizzying movies about movies. Richard Rush's Escher-like vortex The Stunt Man (1980) features Peter O'Toole at his most virtuosic, as a megalomaniacal director who manipulates a veteran on the run from the law into serving as a stuntman. Federico Fellini's kaleidoscopic  (1963) - perhaps the most gloriously expansive vision of itself the cinema has ever produced - weaves together the dreams, memories, and fantasies of a director (Marcello Mastroianni) whose latest project is collapsing around him.
 
Friday, December 8
Godzilla and Beyond*

This month, we're offering you the chance to go on a veritable viewing rampage, with this massive collection of fourteen kaiju classics. Running from Ishiro Honda's original Godzilla(1954) to the director's sci-fi drama Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975), these spectacular Toho productions track the King of the Monsters and a number of his fellow mutants as they evolved over the course of two decades, reflecting all the while many of the anxieties of a postwar world.  
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Saturday, December 9
Split Screen Season Nine

Two decades after it premiered on IFC, the pioneering television series Split Screen has a streaming home on the Channel. In this priceless time capsule, host John Pierson takes viewers on an irreverent trip through filmmaking communities and movie-loving culture at the turn of the millennium. This month, we present the show's penultimate season, which features appearances by Kevin Smith and Ross McElwee, and a hilarious segment in which Christopher Walken heads to the kitchen as the host of his own cooking show.
 
Monday, December 11
The Leopard: Criterion Collection Edition #235

An epic on the grandest possible scale, Luchino Visconti's 1963 masterpiece recreates the tumultuous years of Italy's Risorgimento - when the aristocracy lost its grip and the middle classes rose and formed a unified, democratic Italy. Burt Lancaster stars as the aging prince watching his culture and fortune wane in the face of a new generation, represented by his upstart nephew (Alain Delon) and his beautiful fiancée (Claudia Cardinale). Awarded the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, this lavish adaptation of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa's novel is presented in two distinct incarnations: Visconti's original Italian version and the alternate English-language version. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by film scholar Peter Cowie; an hour-long documentary featuring interviews with Claudia Cardinale, screenwriter Suso Ceccho D'Amico, Rotunno, filmmaker Sydney Pollack, and many others; and more.
 
Tuesday, December 12
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Return to Glennascaul* and The Third Man

Orson Welles brings his incomparable charisma to two dark gems. In Hilton Edwards's short Return to Glennascaul (1951), the actor stars as himself driving through the Irish countryside, where he picks up a man with car trouble and a chilling ghost story to tell; in Carol Reed's shadow-drenched noir masterpiece The Third Man (1949), he delivers one of his most iconic performances as the enigmatic Harry Lime, whose sudden death draws a childhood chum into a perilous journey through postwar Vienna.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, December 13
Phoenix*: Criterion Collection Edition #809

Christian Petzold's evocative 2014 drama, set in rubble-strewn Berlin in 1945, is like no other film about post-World War II Jewish-German identity. After surviving Auschwitz, a former cabaret singer (Nina Hoss) has her disfigured face reconstructed and returns to her war-ravaged hometown to seek out her gentile husband, who may or may not have betrayed her to the Nazis. Without recognizing her, he enlists her to play his wife in a bizarre hall-of-shattered-mirrors story that is as richly metaphorical as it is preposterously engrossing. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a new introduction by critic Imogen Sara Smith; a conversation between director Christian Petzold and actor Nina Hoss; The Making of "Phoenix," a 2014 documentary featuring interviews with Petzold, Hoss, actors Nina Kunzendorf and Ronald Zehrfeld, and production designer K. D. Gruber; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, December 14
I Am Curious: Criterion Collection Edition #179

Seized by customs upon entry to the United States, subject of a heated court battle, and banned in cities across the United States, Vilgot Sjöman's I Am Curious - Yellow is one of the most controversial films of all time. This landmark document of Swedish society during the sexual revolution tells the story of a searching and rebellious young woman, and her personal quest to understand the social and political conditions in 1960s Sweden, as well as her bold exploration of her own sexual identity. In celebration of its fiftieth anniversary, I Am Curious - Yellow is presented here with its companion piece I Am Curious - Blue, a parallel film featuring the same characters and in which the lines between documentary and fiction are even further blurred. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: excerpts from director Vilgot Sjöman's Self Portrait 92, a documentary made for Swedish television; a video introduction by the director; a selected scene audio commentary by Sjöman; and more.
 
Friday, December 15
Friday Night Double Feature: Fitzcarraldo and Burden of Dreams

The limits of human endurance are put to the test in German iconoclast Werner Herzog's 1982 Fitzcarraldo, an epic portrait of a rubber baron's attempts to build an opera house in the Peruvian jungle. The film was the result of a notoriously nightmarish five-year production, glimpses of which are captured in Les Blank's Burden of Dreams, an unsparing behind-the-scenes look at Herzog's quest to bring his impossible vision to the screen.
 
Monday, December 18
Creative Marriages: Juzo Itami and Nobuko Miyamoto

Juzo Itami became the most talked-about Japanese director of the eighties and nineties when he and his wife, actor Nobuko Miyamoto, created a string of audacious movies centered on independent women who were smart and passionate about their work. In the latest installment of Creative Marriages, we're celebrating their partnership in both life and cinema. Watch their 1985 international breakthrough, Tampopo, a mouth-watering "ramen western" starring Miyamoto as a single mother who becomes a first-class noodle chef with a lot of help from her friends. Also on view is the seriocomic social thriller A Taxing Woman (1987), a box-office smash that staged a frontal attack on the contemporary obsession with making money. You can also check out our previous Creative Marriages programs highlighting Federico Fellini and Giulietta Masina, Roger Vadim and Brigitte Bardot, and Jean Cocteau and Jean Marais.
 
Tuesday, December 19
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Time Piece and Tom Jones

Two masters deliver flights of playful cinematic style with their own witty sensibilities. In the Oscar-winning 1963 Tom Jones, British New Wave pioneer Tony Richardson updates Henry Fielding's picaresque eighteenth-century novel with an ebullient, fourth-wall-breaking irreverence. And in the Oscar-nominated 1965 short Time Piece, which features a parody of one of the most memorable scenes in Tom Jones, legendary puppeteer Jim Henson delivers a fast-paced, rhythmically edited tale of a young man desperately trying to escape the passage of time.
 
Wednesday, December 20
Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence*: Criterion Collection Edition #535

In this captivating, skewed World War II drama from Nagisa Oshima, David Bowie regally embodies a British officer interned by the Japanese as a POW. Rock star Ryuichi Sakamoto (who also composed this film's hypnotic score) plays the camp commander, obsessed with the mysterious blond major, while Tom Conti is a British lieutenant colonel who tries to bridge the emotional and language divides between captor and prisoner. Also featuring actor-director Takeshi Kitano in his first dramatic role, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence(1983) is a multilayered, brutal, at times erotic tale of culture clash, and one of Oshima's greatest successes. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: The Oshima Gang, a 1983 making-of featurette; video interviews with producer Jeremy Thomas, screenwriter Paul Mayersberg, actor Tom Conti, and actor-composer Ryuichi Sakamoto; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, December 21
Observations on Film Art No. 14: Girl Shy - Harold Lloyd Meets Classical Hollywood

The silent comedy might be most famous today for its one-off gags and chases, but by the twenties the form had begun to tell increasingly sophisticated feature-length stories, thanks to such pioneering figures as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art - a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at great filmmakers' use of cinematic devices and traditions - scholar David Bordwell unpacks the narrative strategies at play in Lloyd's comedy of embarrassment Girl Shy(1924), illuminating the film's implementation of such classical Hollywood devices as psychological characterization and repeated motifs.
 
Friday, December 22
Friday Night Double Feature: Chéri and Journey to Italy

The work of the French author Colette, celebrated for its evocation of affairs of the heart during the belle epoque, inspired these two tales of precarious romance. Stephen Frears's seductive period piece Chéri (2009), an adaptation of Colette's 1920 novel of the same name, tells the story of the years-long relationship between a courtesan (Michelle Pfeiffer) and her peer's decadent and impressionable son (Rupert Friend). And Robert Rossellini's modernist drama Journey to Italy (1954), loosely based on Colette's Duo (1934), observes the mounting tensions between a married British couple (Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders) during a trip to the Neapolitan countryside.
 
Tuesday, December 26
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Light Is Calling and My Winnipeg

These two films, both beautifully tactile experiments with film form, make brilliant use of found footage. In his eight-minute film Light Is Calling (2004), Bill Morrison cedes the frame to a scene from a 1926 silent film as it appears on a decomposing film reel, in the process crafting a haunting meditation on the ravages of time; in his beguiling "docu-fantasia" My Winnipeg (2007), Guy Maddin mixes archival footage with his own expressionistic black-and-white material to evoke the weird and wonderful world of his hometown.
 
Friday, December 29
Friday Night Double Feature: The Apartment and Brief Encounter

With 2018 just around the corner, take a look back at a Hollywood classic whose climax takes place on New Year's Eve, along with the movie that inspired it. David Lean reached his first great peak with Brief Encounter (1945), starring Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard as refined middle-class lovers who fail to consummate their affair in a borrowed flat when the owner unexpectedly barges in on them. Billy Wilder loved the film, but wondered-who's the guy who owns the apartment? The result: Wilder's five-time Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), which casts Jack Lemmon as the shlemiel who gives his key to his superiors for their trysts, and Shirley MacLaine as the elevator girl and executive's mistress he unexpectedly falls in love with.  
 
Friday, December 29
Weekend: Criterion Collection Edition #635

This scathing satire from Jean-Luc Godard, which celebrates its fiftieth anniversary this week, is one of cinema's great anarchic works. Determined to collect an inheritance from a dying relative, a bourgeois couple travel across the French countryside while civilization crashes and burns around them. Featuring a justly famous sequence in which the camera tracks along a seemingly endless traffic jam, and rich with historical and literary references, Weekend is a surreally funny and disturbing call for revolution, a depiction of society reverting to savagery, and - according to the credits - the end of cinema itself. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a video essay by writer and filmmaker Kent Jones; archival interviews with actors Mireille Darc and Jean Yanne, cinematographer Raoul Coutard, and assistant director Claude Miller; and more.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

December 1
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Stanley Kramer, 1963
Happy Together, Wong Kar-wai, 1997
The World of Jacques Demy, Agnes Varda, 1995
 
December 8
Godzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1954
Godzilla: King of the Monsters!, Ishiro Honda and Terry O. Morse, 1956
Godzilla Raids Again, Motoyoshi Oda, 1955
Rodan, Ishiro Honda, 1956
Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster, Ishiro Honda, 1964
Mothra vs. Godzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1964
Invasion of Astro-Monster, Ishiro Honda, 1965
The War of the Gargantuas, Ishiro Honda, 1966
Son of Godzilla, Jun Fukuda, 1967
Destroy All Monsters, Ishiro Honda, 1968
All Monsters Attack, Ishiro Honda, 1969
Godzilla vs. Megalon, Jun Fukuda, 1973
Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla, Jun Fukuda, 1974
Terror of Mechagodzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1975
 
December 12
Return to Glennascaul, Hilton Edwards, 1951
 
December 13
Phoenix, Christian Petzold, 2014

December 15
Woman in Witness Protection, Juzo Itami, 1997
A Quiet Life, Juzo Itami, 1995
Tales of a Golden Geisha, Juzo Itami, 1990
The Gentle Art of Japanese Extortion, Juzo Itami, 1992
The Funeral, Juzo Itami, 1984
Rubber Band Pistol, Juzo Itami, 1962
The Last Dance, Juzo Itami, 1995

December 20
Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, Nagisa Oshima, 1983
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The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. Other recent additions to the programming include MEET THE FILMMAKER: ATHINA RACHEL TSANGARI and ADVENTURES IN MOVIEGOING WITH BILL HADER.
 
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November 11, 2017

HAPPY END — Trailer & Poster

Happy_end

You had me at Michael Haneke. And then you add Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant, and we've got a very promising movie on hand. Really looking forward to seeing the latest effort from Haneke!

 

THE POST — TRAILER & POSTER

Post

Steven Spielberg's latest movie has crowd-pleaser written all over it for the 50+ generations to which it is clearly aimed. Streep and Hanks are showing their age. It's a reminder that we won't always have these great artists around with us. So, regardless of how predictably tame the narrative about the Washington Post leaking the Pentagon Papers might seem by today's standards of Wikileaks reporting, get out and see this movie. Even if it flops at the box office, "The Post" will be a success.

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