252 posts categorized "Politics"

June 20, 2017

The U.S. Is Shocked Shocked Shocked! That Russia May Have Meddled With Our Election

Screen Shot 2017-06-20 at 7.34.38 PM

Democrats and the media have made much of FBI allegations that Russia meddled in the 2016 presidential election (though evidence has been in short supply). Whether or not it’s true, you kind of have to laugh at the outrage considering the fact that the country that interferes the most in the internal affairs of other nations, including coups and invasions, is none other than the United States of America.

April 25, 2017

THE 2017 CANNES JURY IS ANNOUNCED

CANNES70

Under the presidency of the Spanish director, screenwriter and producer Pedro Almodóvar, the Jury for the 70th Festival de Cannes will be made up of eight key figures from the 7th Art, coming from all over the world. Four women and four men will thus help Pedro Almodóvar select from among the films in Competition. The winners will be announced on Sunday 28th May at the Closing Ceremony, following which the Palme d’or will be awarded in the presence of the winning team.

THE  2017 JURY
 
Pedro ALMODÓVAR – President
(Director, Screenwriter, Producer – Spain)

Maren ADE (Director, Screenwriter, Producer - Germany)

Jessica CHASTAIN (Actress, Producer - United States)

Fan BINGBING (Actress, Producer - China)

Agnès JAOUI (Actress, Screenwriter, Director, Singer – France)

Park CHAN-WOOK (Director, Screenwriter, Producer - South Korea)

Will SMITH (Actor, Producer, Musician – United States

Paolo SORRENTINO (Director, Screenwriter - Italy)

Gabriel YARED (Composer – France)

Maren ADE, director, screenwriter, producer - Germany

Maren_ade

In 1998, Maren Ade began studying film production and direction in Munich. During her studies, she co-founded the film production company Komplizen Film. In 2004, Maren Ade first film, The Forest for the Trees, premiered in Toronto and won the Special Jury Award at the Sundance Film Festival. In 2009, her second film Everyone Else received the Silver Bear for Best Film and for Best Actress. Maren Ade third film, Toni Erdmann, debuted in Competition at the 2016 Festival de Cannes and won numerous awards like the European Film Award. As a producer, she worked on productions like Tabu by Miguel Gomes and Sleeping Sickness by Ulrich Köhler.

 

Jessica CHASTAIN, actress, producer - United States

Jessica

Two-time Academy Award nominee Jessica Chastain has emerged as one of Hollywood’s most sought after actresses of her generation. She has received numerous nominations and accolades for her work, in Kathryn Bigelow’s Zero Dark Thirty, A Most Violent Yearby J.C. Chandor, The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby by Ned Benson and Ridley Scott’s The Martian. Jessica Chastain launched a production company Freckle Films. She is currently in production for Susanna White’s period drama Woman Walks Ahead and will be seen in Xavier Dolan’s The Death and Life of John F. Donovan

 

Fan BINGBING, actress, producer - China

Fan-bingbing

Born in 1981, Fan Bingbing rose to fame in 1998 with the mega-hit TV series My Fair Princess. In 2003, she starred in Cell Phone, which became the highest-grossing Chinese film of the year. Since then, she has starred in many films, most notably Lost in Beijing (2007), Buddha Mountain (2011), and Double Xposure (2012). In 2014, she participated in the Hollywood blockbuster X-Men: Days of Future Past. In 2016, she starred in I Am not Madame Bovary and received the San Sebastian Film Festival Best Actress Award as well as the 11th Asian Film Best Actress Award. Fan is selected for the 2017 TIME 100.

 

Agnès JAOUI, actress, screenwriter, director, singer – France

Agnès JAOUI

Multi-award winning artist Agnès Jaoui joined forces with Jean-Pierre Bacri to develop a theatre and film style of which Kitchen with Apartment and Family Resemblances were first to meet with success. They worked with Alain Resnais on Smoking/No Smoking and Same Old Song. In 2000, Agnès Jaoui directed The Taste of Others which won four César. She wrote and directed Look at Me, which won Best Screenplay Award at the 2004 Festival de Cannes, followed by Let’s Talk about the Rain (2008) and Under the Rainbow(2013). She is a singer, and her Latin “Canta” album won a Victoire de la Musique award in 2007. She can be currently seen in Aurore by Blandine Lenoir.

 

Park CHAN-WOOK, director, screenwriter, producer - South Korea

Park-chan-wook

Ever since his Korean box office record breaking Joint Security Area in the year 2000, Park Chan-wook’s diverse body of work has garnered recognition both at home and abroad. These include his successes at the Festival de Cannes in 2004 with the Grand Prix for Old Boy and the Jury Prize for Thirst in 2009. In 2013, Park Chan-wook expanded his œuvre to include English language films with Stoker and also produced Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer. In 2016, Park Chan-wook returned to Cannes in Competition with The Handmaiden and won the Vulcan Prize, once again establishing him as one of the most significant talents working in cinema today.

 

Will SMITH, actor, producer, musician – United States

Will-Smith

Two-time Academy Award nominee Will Smith has a vast filmography including portrayals of true-life icons in Ali, The Pursuit of Happiness and Concussion. His headlining credits include Independence Day, I, Robot, Hitch, I Am Legend, Men in Black I, II, & III, and last summer’s Suicide Squad. The two-time Grammy Award winner began his career as a musician selling millions of records worldwide before crossing over into television with The Fresh Prince of Bel Air. Will Smith is dedicated to working toward the advancement of communities and individuals through the Will and Jada Smith Family Foundation.

 

Paolo SORRENTINO, director, screenwriter - Italy

Paolo+Sorrentino

Paolo Sorrentino, director and screenwriter, was born in Naples in 1970. Seven of his 8 films have been presented in Competition at the Festival de Cannes, where Il Divo won the Prix du Jury in 2008. In 2014, his film La Grande Bellezza (The Great Beauty) won the Oscar and Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film, as well as a BAFTA. In 2016, La Giovinezza (Youth) gained an Oscar nomination and won three European Film Awards. In 2016, he made his first TV Series: The Young Pope. He has also published a novel “Hanno tutti ragione” in 2010, and two collections of short stories: “Tony Pagoda e i suoi amici” (2012), and “Gli aspetti irrilevanti” (2016).

 

Gabriel YARED, composer - France

Gabriel-yared

After spending his childhood in Lebanon, Gabriel Yared attended the composition classes of Henri Dutilleux in Paris. He stayed in Brazil and returned to France in 1972, and quickly became an orchestrator and producer sought after by the biggest European singers of the time. Since 1980, he devoted most of his time to film composition. He has written more than a hundred scores to date, of which many have earned him prestigious international awards. He wrote his first score for Jean-Luc Godard, which was followed by successful notable collaborations with Jean-Jacques Beineix, Jean-Jacques Annaud (Cesar for The Lover), Anthony Minghella (Oscar for The English Patient) and Xavier Dolan.


Copyrights
Pedro Almodóvar © El Deseo D.A.S.L.U. Nico Bustos
Park Chan-wook © SEO Ji-hyoung
Maren Ade © Iris Janke
Agnès Jaoui © Laurent Viteur / Getty Images
Will Smith © Matt Doyle / Contour by Getty Images
Paolo Sorrentino © C. Laruffa Splash NewsCorbis
Fan Bingbing © Sun Jun
Jessica Chastain © Matt Doyle Photo
Gabriel Yared © Ammar Abd Rabbo
 

April 18, 2017

LAURA POITRAS'S RISK PREMIERES ON MAY 2

  

LAURA POITRAS’S RISK WILL HAVE ITS NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE AS THE CLOSING NIGHT FILM OF ART OF THE REAL FESTIVAL ON MAY 2

Laura Poitras Q&A to follow screening


New York, NY (April 18, 2017) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced today that Laura Poitras’s Risk will have its North American premiere as the Closing Night selection of Art of the Real, FSLC’s essential showcase for boundary-pushing nonfiction film, on May 2. The festival opens this Thursday, April 20, with Theo Anthony’s Rat Film; the complete lineup, featuring an eclectic, globe-spanning host of premieres and discoveries, can be found here

After laying bare Edward Snowden the man and the myth in her Oscar-winning Citizenfour, Laura Poitras returns to the knotty territory of political truth-telling and international espionage with this years-in-the-making portrait of controversial WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. A hero to some, a pariah to others, Assange comes across in this compelling documentary as guarded and inscrutable despite his crusade for complete transparency. Not interested in painting a simple portrait of one man fighting the system, Poitras traces his journey from 2011 all the way through this year’s election, finally admitting in voiceover: “This is not the film I thought I was making.” Significantly updated since its Cannes premiere last May, Risk is a film about principles, power, and human contradiction, and is not to be missed. Poitras will also appear in person for a post-screening discussion. 

NEON will release the film theatrically nationwide on May 5th. Risk is Executive Produced by Sam Esmail, creator of Mr. Robot.

Tickets for Risk are $20; $15 for students, seniors, and members. Learn more, and buy tickets now, at filmlinc.org.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Commentthe U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from The New York Times, Shutterstock, Variety, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. American Airlines is the Official Airline of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

April 17, 2017

APRIL ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK... CONTINUES!

       
 
Includes Adventures in Moviegoing with Michael Cera, 
AntichristTatsuya Nakadai on his films, and Split Screen!
 
Just added to the calendar:
Friday Night Double Feature: The Trip and The Trip to Italy
 
 
Monday, April 17
Tatsuya Nakadai on Five Japanese Masters
Japanese icon Tatsuya Nakadai stopped by Criterion to discuss his storied career, sharing some of the lessons he learned from working with luminaries Akira Kurosawa, Mikio Naruse, Masaki Kobayashi, Kihachi Okamoto, and Hiroshi Teshigahara. Alongside the interview, we present a genre-hopping selection of films that feature his most pivotal roles: Kurosawa's Seven Samurai (1954), Yojimbo(1961), and Sanjuro (1962), Kobayashi's Black River (1956), The Human Condition(1959), and Harakiri (1962), Okamoto's The Sword of Doom (1966), and Naruse's When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (1960).

Tuesday, April 18
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Pay Day and A Taxing Woman
On the heels of Tax Day, this week's Short + Feature pairs two playful films that follow the money: Charlie Chaplin's 1922 Pay Day, a silent short about the wage-related bickering of a bricklayer and his wife, and Juzo Itami's 1987 A Taxing Woman, a tax-collector comedy that the Tampopo director was inspired to make after joining a higher tax bracket himself.
 
Wednesday, April 19
Antichrist*: Criterion Collection Edition #542
Take in Lars von Trier's Antichrist in all its controversial glory, as the graphic psychodrama arrives on the Channel with the complete supplements from the edition, including several behind-the-scenes videos and a documentary on the film's now-legendary premiere at Cannes.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Thursday, April 20
Cinéastes de notre temps: Jean Vigo
As part of our ongoing presentation of episodes from Cinéastes de notre temps(1964-72), a French television series that profiled filmmakers from around the world, we're spotlighting one of the show's first installments. In this 1964 documentary, French New Wave director Jacques Rozier chronicles the life of one of cinema's great enfants terribles, Jean Vigo, who died of tuberculosis at the age of twenty-nine after making just a handful of films, including the redoubtable masterpiece L'Atalante(1934). Compiling interviews with a variety of friends and collaborators of Vigo's, this program attests to the rebellious and poetic spirit the director brought to his work.
 
Friday, April 21
Friday Night Double Feature: Red Desert and The Last Wave
Environmental threats hang over these two atmospheric mood pieces, featured on the Channel just in time for Earth Day. Antonioni's first color film evokes the creeping malaise that comes with industrialization, while the apocalypse itself looms nigh in Peter Weir's beguiling mystery, a dreamlike investigation of the fissures between colonial and aboriginal Australia.

Monday, April 24
Adventures in Moviegoing with Michael Cera
In the latest installment of our Adventures in Moviegoing series, the star of Juno, Superbad, and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World stops by our office to tell us how he became a cinephile and to share some of his favorite films, including Rainer Werner Fassbinder's Fox and His Friends (1975) and Nagisa Oshima's Empire of Passion(1978). Past contributors to the series include Bill Hader, Jonathan Lethem, Mary Karr, and Roger Corman.

Tuesday, April 25
Tuesday's Short + Feature: J. M. Mondésir* and Rashomon
It's all about point of view in this week's Short + Feature, which pairs Akira Kurosawa's 1950 psychological thriller Rashomon with the 2012 French short J. M. Mondésir, about a man who dies after an encounter with the police. Taking a cue from Kurosawa's hallowed classic, writer-director Alice Colomer-Kang examines the elusive nature of truth and interpretation by telling her story from multiple perspectives.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 

Wednesday, April 26
The Tree of Wooden Clogs*: Criterion Collection Edition #854
Director Ermanno Olmi (Il posto) evokes the rhythms of a bygone way of life in this 1978 Palme d'Or winner, tracing the lives and labors of northern Italian peasants through the seasons. This newly restored masterpiece makes its debut on the Channel complete with all of the special features that appear on its recently released disc edition, including a television program that pays a visit to the farm where the film was shot and an introduction by Mike Leigh, whose own films reflect the naturalistic rigor of Olmi's craft.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 

Thursday, April 27
Observations on Film Art No. 6: Camera Movement in Three Colors: Red
In our ongoing, Channel-exclusive series Observations on Film Art, film scholars David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, and Jeff Smith explore the nuts and bolts of cinematic style through individual works by great auteurs. In the latest episode, Smith walks us through the eerie metaphysics of Three Colors: Red, demonstrating how director Krzysztof Kieślowski uses camera movements to establish mysterious connections between two characters who are largely unaware of each other. Previous entries in this series have examined topics like Sanshiro Sugata's lightning-fast editing and Abbas Kiarostami's evocative use of landscape.

Friday, April 28
Friday Night Double Feature: The Trip* and The Trip to Italy*
"Gentlemen to bed, for we rise at 9:30-ish!" Now on the Criterion Channel, the first two hysterically funny entries in Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon's epicurean travel series. With wine, food, and celebrity impersonations galore, the UK's sharpest comedy duo make their way through England and Italy. Soon they'll hit the road again in The Trip to Spain, premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
The Triplimited engagement, ends October 27.
The Trip to Italy: limited engagement, ends October 27.
 
Saturday, April 29
Split Screen Season Four
Your wild ride through the indie film world-by filmmakers, for everyone. From 1997 to 2001, producer and author John Pierson and his band of cinephiles roved the U.S., seeking pockets of movie madness for this irreverent, sixty-episode IFC series. The result is an indispensible portrait of the American independent film scene at the turn of the millennium. Seasons one through three are already on the Channel, and this month, we debut season four!

April 13, 2017

Can’t We All Just Overbook? BY TED RALL

Phone video captured a United Airlines passenger being dragged off an airplane for refusing to be bumped after he had boarded. The airline said the flight was overbooked (lie) but it highlighted the practice of selling the same seat twice. Why can't the rest of us do the same thing?

Phone video captured a United Airlines passenger being dragged off an airplane for refusing to be bumped after he had boarded. The airline said the flight was overbooked (lie) but it highlighted the practice of selling the same seat twice. Why can’t the rest of us do the same thing?

 

December 08, 2016

Martin Scorsese Interview on Trump and the Pope

November 09, 2016

SYNDICATED COLUMN: Here Comes the Rise of the Anti-Trump Left — BY TED RALL

NCSU Peace ProtestLet me get this out of the way first: I’m irritated at all the media people repeating that “nobody” saw Donald Trump’s “upset” win coming. I saw it coming a million miles away. Here, let me touch myself…am I someone? Yep, I still exist. Is it really possible that I’m the only pundit in America who grew up in the Rust Belt and goes home to visit?

Of course the corporate media morons didn’t see this coming. They didn’t see looming disaster in the invasion of Iraq. During the primaries, they ignored the polls that proved Bernie Sanders was a better candidate than Hillary Clinton against Donald Trump. It certainly never occurred to the corporate media morons that reducing tens of millions of middle-class workers to poverty, in order to line the pockets of globalization-besotted elites, might turn them into tens of millions of angry voters.

The bigger the news outlet where these mainstream political hacks work, the more money they make, the more journalism prizes they win, the less these idiots see anything coming (c.f., Ross Douthat, New York Times, March 8, 2016: “Donald Trump will not be the Republican nominee”).

Well, here’s something else they don’t see coming: the rise of a new American Left energized and united by its opposition to Donald Trump and his policies, one whose size and militancy recalls the glory days of the 1960s.

There’s something happening here.

Well, there soon will be.

As I wrote in my 2010 book The Anti-American Manifesto, the United States does not have a Left — an organization or movement dedicated to the radical overthrow of the existing political and economic order. As Chris Hedges has eloquently described, this country has even lost its bourgeois 20th century liberal class.

Leftists and liberals are part of the mainstream political conversation in most developed countries. Here, however, a tacit ongoing conspiracy between media gatekeepers and corporate Democratic and Republican political leaders has marginalized the roughly 35% of Americans who oppose capitalism and militarism. Think about it: when’s the last time you saw someone completely opposed to military action speaking on cable television news? Ever heard of a communist or socialist hired to write for a newspaper or magazine?

The silencing of the American Left, brutal and relentless since the early 1970s, has impoverished our political culture and deprived the poor and oppressed of the help to which they are entitled by birthright. But that’s about to come to an end.

The devastating defeat of Hillary Clinton, the ultimate candidate of the neo-conservative Democratic center-right, has discredited her patrons, the pro-globalization elites. The election of Donald Trump sets the stage for a civil war within the party in which its liberal progressive wing is likely to emerge victorious, dominating electoral politics within the mainstream left for the foreseeable future. The Clintons, Obama, the Democratic Leadership Council types have had it their way for too long. They’ve lost. Now they need to shut up and go away.

Meanwhile, out in the streets where real political change can happen, I expect to see an anti-Trump resistance incorporating anarchists, veterans of the Occupy Wall Street movement, communists and socialists, radicalized left-wing Democrats, old hippies from the 1960s, Black Lives Matter activists, pro-immigrant people, work together and individually to oppose the radical right policies that we are going to see flying out of Washington over the next few years.

Out on the streets, Trump’s repressive tone will prompt brutal police tactics to which nonviolence will no longer be seen as the only acceptable counteraction. The “peace police” of the wimpy protests of the 1990s and 2000s will go extinct. Nonviolence will retake its rightful place as a noble and desirable tactic, but no longer the exclusive approach to taking on repressive government goons.

Donald Trump will be atrocious for the United States, especially with the Republican House and Senate. He’ll attack immigrants, Latinos, Muslims, victims of police brutality, God knows who else.

But he’ll be good for the Left. And, in the long run, the Left will be great for us.

(Ted Rall is author of “Trump: A Graphic Biography,” an examination of the life of the Republican presidential nominee in comics form. Support independent political cartooning and writing — support Ted on Patreon.)

What Do We Do Now? By Ted Rall

Not for me: I always said Donald Trump had a strong chance to win the presidency in a country where tens of millions of people are economically insecure, racist and/or sexist. The far right impulse has always been strong in American politics. But Trump has shocked the media and political establishment by pulling a come-from-behind victory over the deeply flawed right-wing Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. Now we, and the world, must brace for the arrival of protofascism in the Oval Office, enabled by Republican rule over both houses of Congress.

Not for me: I always said Donald Trump had a strong chance to win the presidency in a country where tens of millions of people are economically insecure, racist and/or sexist. The far right impulse has always been strong in American politics. But Trump has shocked the media and political establishment by pulling a come-from-behind victory over the deeply flawed right-wing Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. Now we, and the world, must brace for the arrival of protofascism in the Oval Office, enabled by Republican rule over both houses of Congress.

November 07, 2016

SYNDICATED COLUMN: Hate Trump AND Clinton? There Are Better Alternatives

Voting-boothHillary Clinton and Donald Trump are the least popular presidential candidates of all time. So why vote for either one?

You wouldn’t know it to watch or read the news, but living in a duopoly doesn’t require you to hold your nose as you vote for someone you hate – merely because you hate the other candidate even more, or you’re deathly afraid of them. There are alternatives. And they don’t require you to compromise your ethics or vote against your own interests.

We’ve all heard it so often that we take it for granted: if you don’t vote, you’re apathetic. If you’re apathetic, you don’t have any right to complain when someone you don’t like wins and messes up the country.

That might be true when at least one of the candidates is palatable. But the argument falls apart at times like this, when most Americans agree that both are awful.

You and me, we may or may not agree on policy. But we probably agree on this: Wednesday morning, someone terrible will be president-elect. My lesser of two evils would be Hillary Clinton. But voting for her would tell the world that invading Iraq was OK. It would tell working-class people that NAFTA another free trade deals are OK. It would endorse the things that she endorses: bombing Libya and Syria, arming jihadis, Guantánamo, influence peddling, corruption on a scale that would make Nixon blush. None of that stuff is OK.

We must vote for Clinton in order to keep Trump out. That’s what they tell us. Trump, after all, is racist. But so is Clinton! What could be more racist than her obscene “war on terror”? All her victims are Muslim and brown – which is why white America doesn’t care. And don’t get me started on her and her husband’s “criminal justice reform” of the 1990s against “superpredators.”

With a “choice” like that, you have to look outside the box:

Voter Boycott

Citizens of countries with repressive and unresponsive ruling regimes often resort to the honorable strategy of the voter boycott. By denying the tyrants their votes, they rob their oppressors of legitimacy.

Never doubt that governments need their citizens to vote. For example, you might wonder why Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein bothered to hold his 2002 reelection campaign, in which he was the only candidate. The 11.4 million Iraqis who gave him his 100.00% victory (up from 99.96% in his previous “race”) allowed him, just before the U.S. invasion, to tell the world that he enjoyed his people’s popular support.

The “No Land! No House! No Vote!” movement, which began in 2004, calls for the poor and dispossessed to boycott South Africa’s electoral political system on the ground that the bourgeois political parties don’t care about their interests. In the 2011 election, 42% of registered voters respected the boycott. Concerned that the movement hurts its reputation internationally — and it has — the ruling African National Congress party has subjected the movement to torture and beatings.

It isn’t hard to imagine that a substantial decline in America’s already low voter participation rate would have some interesting effects. It would deny the United States its current holier-than-thou attitude toward other countries. And it would certainly inspire Americans outside the two-party system to consider the creation of a new political movement or third party as a more viable.

“If a huge number of people joined [in an election boycott] it would make an important statement,” Noam Chomsky has said.

Leave the Presidential Box Blank

“I will vote for Republicans up and down the ballot,” says Ari Fleischer, press secretary for George W. Bush. “But when it comes to the presidency, I’m going to leave my ballot blank.” Some Latino Republicans say they’ll do the same. So do some Bernie Sanders Democrats.

As with a voter boycott, the idea is to let the system know that you are civically engaged, not apathetic. Nevertheless, you’re displeased with the candidates on offer.

In counties and states that tally blank (also called “spoilt”) votes, this approach registers as a “none of the above” protest vote. The problem is, most municipalities do not count them — so they can’t send a message to the powers that be, the media, or to prospective third-party candidates.

Third Party

            The appeal of voting third party is obvious: it’s a protest vote and it allows you to direct your vote to someone whom you might really want to see win in an ideal world. The problem is, the fact that it isn’t an ideal world is the reason that you’re voting going outside the duopoly in the first place.

I’m voting for Jill Stein. My reason is simple: I would be happy to see her elected president. I agree with her on the vast majority of important issues. I can’t say that about anyone else on the ballot. (Not sure if that’s true for you? I strongly recommend that you take this test to determine which candidate is closest to you on policy.)

There’s only one reasonable argument against voting for a candidate who, like Stein, won’t win but with whom you agree: the lesser of two evils. In my case, by voting for Stein instead of Clinton, I’m effectively helping Trump. (Let’s forget for a moment that I live in New York, which will certainly go to Hillary.)

Theoretically, that’s a powerful argument. Trump is a fascist. I’m terrified of what he would do as president. I hate Hillary – but she’s not quite as obviously dangerous. Fortunately, this lesser-of-two-evils argument dies on the hill of mathematics.

Unless you are in Chicago, where you can make the dead vote, the only vote you control is your own: one. Statisticians have found that the odds of one vote changing the outcome of the presidential election is 1-in-10 million — and that’s only if you live in a swing state. For most people, the odds are more like 1-in-60 million. As one wag calculated, you have the same odds of changing the outcome of a major election as dying in a car accident while driving to the voting station.

The odds of your vote “going to waste” are significantly less than being struck by lightning twice during your life.

So live a little. Vote, or don’t vote, however you feel like.

By Ted Rall

(Ted Rall is author of “Trump: A Graphic Biography,” an examination of the life of the Republican presidential nominee in comics form. Support independent political cartooning and writing — support Ted on Patreon.)

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