9 posts categorized "Streaming"

September 03, 2018

SEPTEMBER PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

 
SEPTEMBER PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Olivier Assayas's Clouds of Sils Maria, 
Adventures in Moviegoing with Paul Feig, and Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man!
 
Saturday, September 1
Cul-de-sac*: Edition #577

This slyly absurd tale of paranoia stars Donald Pleasence and Françoise Dorléac as a withdrawn couple whose isolated house is invaded by a rude, burly American gangster on the run, played by Lionel Stander. The three engage in role-playing games of sexual and emotional humiliation in one of Roman Polanski's most evocative and claustrophobic tales of modern chaos. Supplemental features: a 2003 documentary about the making of the film and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Monday, September 3
The Holy Mountain:  
Now playing in Art-House America: Texas Theatre, Dallas, Texas

The Channel-exclusive series Art-House America recently visited the Texas Theatre, a Dallas venue that became infamous as the site where Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested and now hosts a variety of imaginative repertory screening events. Alongside our documentary profile of the theater, the staff is hosting an ongoing series in which they pick films that reflect their approach to programming. The latest addition is Alejandro Jodorowsky's perennial midnight-movie favorite, a mind-bending satire of religion, colonialism, and consumerism that stars the Chilean director as a mysterious figure called "The Alchemist" who leads a group of initiates on a bizarre esoteric quest. A feast of hallucinatory tableaux and outrageous imagery, The Holy Mountain is one of the most indelible cult classics of its era, and shares its audacious formal approach with the previous entry in the Texas Theatre's series, Chris Marker's entrancing sci-fi fable La Jetée.
 
Tuesday, September 4
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Cage* and Kes
Boys befriend birds in this week's short and feature pairing. The tensions within a Romanian nuclear family strapped for cash come to a boil in Adrian Sitaru's 2010 short The Cage when the young son adopts an ailing pigeon, to the chagrin of his exasperated father (Graduation's Adrian Titieni) and long-suffering mother. Then, Ken Loach's 1970 Kes, a benchmark of social realism, explores the inner life of a miner's son growing up in Northern England through his bond with a wild kestrel.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, September 5
Dead Man*: Edition #919

With Dead Man, his first period piece, Jim Jarmusch imagined the nineteenth-century American West as an existential wasteland, delivering a surreal reckoning with the ravages of industrialization, the country's legacy of violence and prejudice, and the natural cycle of life and death. Accountant William Blake (Johnny Depp) has hardly arrived in the godforsaken outpost of Machine before he's caught in the middle of a fatal lovers' quarrel. Wounded and on the lam, Blake falls under the watch of the outcast Nobody (Gary Farmer), who guides his companion on a spiritual journey, teaching him to dispense poetic justice along the way. Featuring austerely beautiful black-and-white photography by Robby Müller and a live-wire score by Neil Young, Dead Man is a profound and unique revision of the western genre. Supplemental features: a Q&A in which Jarmusch responds to questions sent in by fans, rarely seen footage of Neil Young composing and performing the film's score, an interview with actor Gary Farmer, deleted scenes, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Thursday, September 6
Adventures in Moviegoing with Paul Feig
In the latest episode of the Channel-exclusive guest-programmer series Adventures in Moviegoing, the director of Bridesmaids and Ghostbusters and creator of Freaks and Geeks sits down with author Sam Wasson to talk about some of his favorite films and the experiences that have shaped his approach to comedy. From childhood viewings of PlayTime and What's Up, Doc? to later discoveries like The Conversation, Feig draws lessons about storytelling and style from the films that have expanded his conception of what a movie can be.
 
Friday, September 7
Friday Night Double Feature: Barry Lyndon and Tom Jones
Stanley Kubrick and Tony Richardson take radically different routes through the past in these picaresque period films about rakish social climbers. Kubrick's magisterial 1975 adaptation of William Makepeace Thackeray's The Luck of Barry Lyndon adopts a tone of Olympian irony toward its ambitious hero (Ryan O'Neal) and mounts a lavish recreation of the eighteenth-century aristocracy he schemes his way into. Earthier, zippier, and bawdier, Richardson's 1963 Oscar winner Tom Jones injects an irreverent charm into Henry Fielding's classic portrait of an amorous foundling, played by Albert Finney in a star-making performance.
Tuesday, September 11
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Deer Boy* and Antichrist
These darkly atmospheric fairy tales stray into the forest to explore some of the primal anxieties of parents and children. Polish filmmaker Katarzyna Gondek's hauntingly atmospheric Deer Boy (2017) tells the tale of a boy born with antlers, a misfortune that causes his mother and father feelings of shame, and the child to question his true nature-especially when he grows old enough to learn the family trade: deer hunting. Danish provocateur Lars von Trier's psychodrama Antichrist (2009) trails a therapist (Willem Dafoe) and his wife (Charlotte Gainsbourg) into the woods, where they retreat after the accidental death of their infant son. But no respite is to be found, as they encounter all manner of gruesome terrors courtesy of Mother Nature- and, eventually, each other.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, September 12
Heaven Can Wait: Edition #291

Deceased playboy Henry Van Cleve (Don Ameche) presents himself to the outer offices of Hades, where he asks a bemused Satan for permission to enter through the gates of hell. Though the devil doubts that Henry's sins qualify him for eternal damnation, Henry proceeds to recount a lifetime of wooing and pursuing women, his long, happy marriage to Martha (Gene Tierney) notwithstanding. Ernst Lubitsch's Heaven Can Wait, nominated for Academy Awards for best picture and director, is an enduring classic that showcases the filmmaker's trademark blend of wit, urbanity, and grace. Supplemental features: a conversation from 2005 between film critics Molly Haskell and Andrew Sarris, an episode from 1982 of Creativity with Bill Moyers exploring screenwriter Samson Raphaelson's life and career, home recordings of director Ernst Lubitsch playing the piano, and more.
 
Friday, September 14
Friday Night Double Feature: Wife vs. Secretary and The Hudsucker Proxy

The corporate world of midcentury Manhattan invites intrigue and suspicion in these two spins on the screwball. In Clarence Brown's sophisticated romance Wife vs. Secretary (1936), high-rolling Manhattanites Van (Clark Gable) and Linda Stanhope (Myrna Loy) seem to be living the life-until Linda begins to (wrongly) suspect her magazine-publisher husband of having an affair with his secretary (Jean Harlow). Taking its cues from golden-age comedies like Brown's, the Coen brothers' brilliantly stylized corporate satire The Hudsucker Proxy (1994) sets into motion a dizzying plot involving a scheming executive (Paul Newman), the dimwit (Tim Robbins) he installs as the president of his company, and the crusading journalist (Jennifer Jason Leigh) who poses as the new boss's secretary in an effort to figure out why.
Tuesday, September 18
Tuesday's Short + Feature: When We Lived in Miami* and Key Largo

Drama erupts against darkening skies in the Sunshine State. In Amy Seimetz's hypnotic 2012 short When We Lived in Miami, filmed in the city during Hurricane Isaac, a young mother (Seimetz) struggles to raise her daughter after her husband's departure, with the wind and rain beginning to lash the coast. Using hurricane season as a backdrop for a harder-boiled story, John Huston's 1948 noir Key Largo stars Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall (together on-screen for the fourth and final time) as occupants of a run-down Florida Keys. As they hunker down ahead of an approaching storm, they end up being held hostage by an infamous gangster (Edward G. Robinson).
Wednesday, September 19
Clouds of Sils Maria*: Edition #822

This multilayered, immensely entertaining drama from the great contemporary French director Olivier Assayas is a singular look at the intersection of high art and popular culture. The always extraordinary Juliette Binoche is stirring as Maria, a stage and screen icon who is being courted to star in a new production of the play that made her famous-only this time she must assume the role of the older woman. Kristen Stewart matches her punch for punch as her beleaguered assistant, called upon to provide support both professional and emotional for her mercurial boss. And Chloë Grace Moretz is Maria's callow new castmate, a starlet waiting in the wings. An amorphous, soul-searching tale, filled with ethereal images of its Swiss Alps setting, Clouds of Sils Maria brilliantly dramatizes one woman's reckoning with herself and the world. Supplemental features: an interview with Assayas, a program featuring Binoche and Stewart on their roles in the film, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Friday, September 21
Friday Night Double FeatureThe Man with the Golden Arm and Pale Flower
The siren call of addiction beckons in these two noirish films with jazz-infused scores. Otto Preminger's 1955 The Man with the Golden Arm, which was controversial at the time of its release for its forthright depiction of heroin addiction, takes a hard look at the life of an aspiring Chicago drummer (Frank Sinatra) who struggles to stay clean after his release from prison. Elmer Bernstein's music, which was nominated for an Oscar (along with Sinatra), gives the movie with its distinctive nervous rhythm. A breakthrough for Japanese New Wave director Masahiro Shinoda, 1964's seductive and impeccably crafted Pale Flower travels deep into Tokyo's underworld, tracking a yakuza as he falls under the sway of a beautiful gambling addict. The percussive score by avant-garde composer Toru Takemitsu, a frequent collaborator of Shinoda's, serves to heighten the seductive yet dangerous atmosphere.
 
Monday, September 24
Observations on Film Art #23: Mutations of Memory-Editing in Hiroshima mon amour
With his 1959 debut feature, Hiroshima mon amour, French editor-turned-director Alain Resnais forever altered the way memory was captured on-screen. Working from a screenplay by Marguerite Duras, Resnais tells the story of a French actress and a Japanese architect who engage in a brief, intense affair against the backdrop of postwar Hiroshima. Through an innovative structure that weaves together past and present, the film navigates the currents of the couple's personal pain and public anguish. For the latest episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that offers viewers a monthly ten-minute dose of film school, Professor Jeff Smith examines the ways in which Resnais's puzzle-like masterpiece redefined cinematic language in its use of groundbreaking editing techniques.
Tuesday, September 25
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Voice Thief* and The Dance of Reality

Two twisted, carnivalesque visions, sprung from the wild minds of cult filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky and his son Adan. Starring Asia Argento, Adan's 2013 short film The Voice Thief tells the story of an opera singer who loses her voice, prompting her husband to go on a journey into the underworld to recover it. That same year, Alejandro made his semi-autobiographical The Dance of Reality, a fantastical rendering of his childhood growing up in politically turbulent Chile, featuring music composed by Adan.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, September 26
McCabe & Mrs. Miller: Edition #827

This unorthodox dream western by Robert Altman may be the most radically beautiful film to come out of the New American Cinema. It stars Warren Beatty and Julie Christie as two newcomers to the raw Pacific Northwest mining town of Presbyterian Church, who join forces to provide the miners with a superior kind of whorehouse experience. The appearance of representatives of a powerful mining company with interests of its own, however, threatens to be the undoing of their plans. With its fascinating flawed characters, evocative cinematography by the great Vilmos Zsigmond, innovative overlapping dialogue, and haunting use of Leonard Cohen songs, McCabe & Mrs. Miller brilliantly deglamorized and revitalized the most American of genres. Supplemental features: an audio commentary featuring Altman and producer David Foster, a making-of documentary, a conversation about the film and Altman's career between film historians Cari Beauchamp and Rick Jewell, a featurette from the film's 1970 production, and more.
 
Friday, September 28
Friday Night Double Feature: Fox and His Friends and Multiple Maniacs

Two of cinema's greatest queer provocateurs take center stage in this double bill, each with his signature troupe of outsider performers. In Fox and His Friends, Rainer Werner Fassbinder's controversial 1975 depiction of gay life in West Germany, the director stars as a working-class innocent who lets himself be taken advantage of by his bourgeois new boyfriend and his circle of materialistic friends. "Seeing a Fassbinder retrospective is better than drugs, liquor and sex put together," said John Waters, whose gloriously grotesque second feature, 1970's Multiple Maniacs, shows a similar taste for no-holds-barred provocation. Overflowing with depravity, Waters' gleeful mockery of the peace-and-love ethos features the Cavalcade of Perversion, a traveling show mounted by a group of misfits whose shocking proclivities are topped only by those of their leader, played by the larger-than-life Divine.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
September 1
Cul-de-sac, Roman Polanski, 1966
Kes, Ken Loach, 1970
 
September 4
The Cage, Adrian Sitaru, 2010
 
September 5
Dead Man, Jim Jarmusch, 1995
 
September 11
Deer Boy, Katarzyna Gondek, 2017
 
September 18
When We Lived in Miami, Amy Seimetz, 2013
 
September 19
Clouds of Sils Maria, Olivier Assayas, 2014
 
September 25
The Voice Thief, Adan Jodorowsky, 2013
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.
 

July 25, 2018

AUGUST PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
AUGUST PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Sydney Pollack's Tootsie, 
Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins on The World, the Flesh and the Devil, and Sofia Coppola's Lick the Star!
 
Wednesday, August 1
Tootsie: Edition #738*

In Tootsie, Michael Dorsey lands the role of a lifetime-as did the actor playing him, Dustin Hoffman. This multilayered comedy from Sydney Pollack follows the elaborate deception of a down-on-his-luck New York actor who poses as a woman to get a soap opera gig; while "Dorothy Michaels" skyrockets to fame, Michael finds himself learning to be a better man. Given support by a stellar cast that includes Dabney Coleman, Charles Durning, Teri Garr, George Gaynes, Bill Murray, and, in a breakthrough performance, Jessica Lange, Tootsie is a funny, cutting, and poignant film from an American moment defined by shifting social and sexual identities. Supplemental features: an audio commentary featuring director Sydney Pollack, interviews with Hoffman and comedy writer Phil Rosenthal, interview with Dorothy Michaels by film critic Gene Shalit, two documentaries about the making of the film, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, August 1
Barry Jenkins Presents The World, the Flesh and the Devil*

As a guest curator on the Channel-exclusive series Adventures in Moviegoing, Barry Jenkins introduces this atmospheric science fiction film from 1959. Mine inspector Ralph (Harry Belafonte) digs himself out of a caved-in coal shaft only to discover that a sudden apocalypse has wiped humanity from the face of the earth. When he meets two other survivors in New York, he discovers that prejudice and taboo have outlived the demise of civilization itself. Directed by Ranald MacDougall, and produced by Belafonte's own production company, The World, the Flesh and the Devil fuses ingenious genre filmmaking with incisive social commentary.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Thursday, August 2
Female Trouble: Edition #929
Glamour has never been more grotesque than in Female Trouble, which injects the Hollywood melodrama with anarchic decadence. Divine, director John Waters' larger-than-life muse, engulfs the screen with charisma as Dawn Davenport, the living embodiment of the film's lurid mantra, "Crime is beauty," who progresses from a teenage nightmare hell-bent on getting cha-cha heels for Christmas to a fame monster whose egomaniacal impulses land her in the electric chair. Shot in Waters' native Baltimore on 16 mm, with a cast drawn from his beloved troupe of regulars, the Dreamlanders (including Mink Stole, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, Edith Massey, and Cookie Mueller), this film­-the director's favorite of his work with Divine-comes to life through the tinsel-toned vision of production designer Vincent Peranio and costume designer/makeup artist Van Smith. An endlessly quotable fan favorite, Female Trouble offers up perverse pleasures that never fail to satisfy. Supplemental features: audio commentary featuring Waters, a conversation between Waters and critic Dennis Lim, interviews with cast and crew members, deleted scenes and alternate takes, and more.
 
Friday, August 3
Friday Night Double Feature: The Clock and Before Sunrise

Time runs out for new lovers in these exquisitely romantic films by Vincente Minelli and Richard Linklater. The Clock (1945) stars Robert Walker as a soldier on leave who meets cute with Judy Garland in Penn Station. The couple fall deeply in love on a rhapsodic tour of New York City-stunningly recreated on a studio soundstage-before the war threatens to separate them forever. In Before Sunrise (1995), an American tourist (Ethan Hawke) and French student (Julie Delpy) meet by chance on a train to Vienna and decide to spend a day together. Over the course of a rambling, charming, intimate series of conversations, they form a tender connection, made all the more poignant by the chance that they'll never see each other again.
Tuesday, August 7
Tuesday's Short and Feature: Hunger* and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
Gluttony and greed drive men to dangerous and grotesque extremes in this week's Short + Feature pairing. Peter Foldes's 1974 Cannes-award-winning short Hunger, one of the first computer-animated films ever made, follows a shape-shifting figure who sets out at the end of a workday on a monstrous eating binge and is consumed by the wages of sin. Then, John Huston's classic fable of adventure and avarice-shot on location south of the border-stars Humphrey Bogart, Tim Holt, and Walter Huston (the filmmaker's father) as Americans in Mexico whose hunt for gold drives them to paranoia, desperation, and violence.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, August 8
Being There: Edition #864
In one of his most finely tuned performances, Peter Sellers plays the pure-hearted, childlike Chance, a gardener who is forced into the wilds of Washington, D.C., when his wealthy guardian dies. Shocked to discover that the real world doesn't respond to the click of a remote, Chance stumbles into celebrity after being taken under the wing of a tycoon (Melvyn Douglas, in an Oscar-winning performance), who mistakes his protégé's horticultural mumblings for sagacious pronouncements on life and politics, and whose wife (Shirley MacLaine) targets Chance as the object of her desire. Adapted from a novel by Jerzy Kosinski, this satire, both deeply melancholy and hilarious, is the culmination of Hal Ashby's remarkable string of films in the 1970s, and a carefully modulated examination of the ideals, anxieties, and media-fueled delusions that shaped American culture during that decade. Supplemental features: a documentary on the making of the film, excerpts from a 1980 American Film Institute seminar with director Hal Ashby, appearances from 1980 by actor Peter Sellers on The Don Lane Show, and more.
Friday, August 10
Friday Night Double Feature: An Actor's Revenge and Tootsie
The duplicitous world of acting takes center stage in these two tales of gender-bending thespians. Kon Ichikawa's kabuki-inspired melodrama An Actor's Revenge (1963) features a chameleonic performance by Kazuo Hasegawa, who plays a female impersonator intent on avenging the deaths of his parents. And in Sydney Pollack's Tootsie (1982), struggling actor Michael (Dustin Hoffman) lands the role of a lifetime by posing as a woman for a soap-opera gig-a part that brings him unexpected fame, as well as a crash course in the trials and tribulations faced by women in 1980s America.
Tuesday, August 14
Tuesday's Short and Feature: Lick the Star* and Smithereens

Trailblazing female filmmakers deliver two lo-fi portraits of young women living dangerously, both fueled by killer soundtracks. Just before breaking through with The Virgin Suicides, Sofia Coppola made her first foray into directing with Lick the Star (1998), a black-and-white 16 mm short about the viciousness of high school cliques that establishes the filmmaker's ongoing fascination with the interior lives of women. With Smithereens (1982)-the first American independent film to compete for the Palme d'Or-Susan Seidelman captures the grit and glam of eighties downtown New York through the story of a fame-seeking punk heroine.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, August 15
Barry Lyndon: Edition #897

Stanley Kubrick bent the conventions of the historical drama to his own will in this dazzling vision of a pitiless aristocracy, adapted from a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray. In picaresque detail, Barry Lyndon chronicles the adventures of an incorrigible trickster (Ryan O'Neal) whose opportunism takes him from an Irish farm to the battlefields of the Seven Years' War and the parlors of high society. For the most sumptuously crafted film of his career, Kubrick recreated the decadent surfaces and intricate social codes of the period, evoking the light and texture of eighteenth-century painting with the help of pioneering cinematographic techniques and lavish costume and production design, all of which earned Academy Awards. The result is a masterpiece-a sardonic, devastating portrait of a vanishing world whose opulence conceals the moral vacancy at its heart. Supplemental features: a documentary featuring cast and crew interviews as well as audio excerpts from a 1976 interview with director Stanley Kubrick, a program about the film's groundbreaking visuals, an interview with critic Michel Ciment, and more.
Thursday, August 16
Masterclass: Damien Chazelle on Chronicle of a Summer

The last few years have been a wild ride for director Damien Chazelle. His semi-autobiographical breakthrough, Whiplash, received three Academy Awards, and his contemporary spin on the golden-age musical, La La Land, made him the youngest person to ever win an Oscar. Last winter, the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Cinematheque invited Chazelle to present a rare 35 mm print of La La Land, and also hosted a series that included a selection of his personal favorite films. A passionate cinephile who developed his inventive approach to style and form while studying documentary filmmaking at Harvard, Chazelle joined professor Kelley Conway for a discussion about Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin's 1961 cinéma verité masterwork Chronicle of a Summer, in which he delved into the evolution of documentary cinema in the sixties and the ways in which nonfiction film has influenced his work with actors. In this program, we present the full wide-ranging talk alongside our edition of Chronicle of a Summer.
Friday, August 17
Friday Night Double Feature: Lolita and The Night of the Iguana

Sue Lyon delivers provocative performances in these two literary adaptations. With her heart-shaped glasses and coquettish charm, the actress, under the direction of Stanley Kubrick, made a cinematic icon out of the title character of Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, a fourteen-year-old girl entangled in a forbidden relationship with a middle-aged professor (James Mason). In John Huston's take on Tennessee Williams's play The Night of the Iguana, Lyon once again embodies a daring nymphet, this time attempting to seduce an unstable priest played by Richard Burton.
 
Tuesday, August 21
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Moonshiners* and A Private Function*

Oink, oink! This porcine pair of comedies kicks off with Juho Kuosmanen's 2018 short The Moonshiners, which sets out to remake a lost 1907 movie thought to be the first feature in Finnish film history. In Kuosmanen's take, a couple embark on a journey to find the essentials for a good life: moonshine-making equipment and a pig. Then, in Malcolm Mowbray's 1984 comedy A Private Function, Maggie Smith and Michael Palin star as a couple in postwar England who steal a hog fattened up for a royal wedding celebration.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, August 22
The Philadelphia Story: Edition #901
With this furiously witty comedy of manners, Katharine Hepburn revitalized her career and cemented her status as the era's most iconic leading lady-thanks in great part to her own shrewd orchestrations. While starring in the Philip Barry stage play The Philadelphia Story, Hepburn acquired the screen rights, handpicking her friend George Cukor to direct. The intoxicating screenplay by Donald Ogden Stewart pits the formidable Philadelphia socialite Tracy Lord (Hepburn, at her most luminous) against various romantic foils, chief among them her charismatic ex-husband (Cary Grant), who disrupts her imminent marriage by paying her family estate a visit, accompanied by a tabloid reporter on assignment to cover the wedding of the year (James Stewart, in his only Academy Award-winning performance). A fast-talking screwball comedy as well as a tale of regret and reconciliation, this convergence of golden-age talent is one of the greatest American films of all time. Supplemental features: an audio commentary from 2005 featuring film scholar Jeanine Basinger, a documentary about the origin of the character and her social milieu, a piece about actor Katharine Hepburn's role in the development of the film, two full episodes of The Dick Cavett Show from 1973, and more.
 
Friday, August 24
Friday Night Double Feature: Child's Pose and White Heat

The bond between mother and son isn't always so wholesome, as these two films go to show. Portraying a corrupt society where everyone seems to have a price, Romanian filmmaker Călin Peter Netzer's award-winning drama Child's Pose (2013) follows a well-to-do woman as she races to steer her ne'er-do-well son clear of facing charges for a fatal hit-and-run. Raoul Walsh's classic noir White Heat (1949) revolves around a psychopathic criminal (James Cagney) who learned his gangster ways from-and remains overly devoted to-his ruthless mother.
 
Monday, August 27
Observations on Film Art No. 22: Dissolves in The Long Day Closes

Terence Davies's achingly beautiful The Long Day Closes (1992) adopts the perspective of a young boy growing up in 1950s Liverpool, affording an intimate glimpse of the hopes and fears of a lonely child on the cusp of adolescence. Unlike many coming-of-age films, Davies's heavily autobiographical second feature eschews a linear progression in favor of a boldly nonchronological method of storytelling. In the latest episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that every month offers viewers a ten-minute dose of film school, Professor Kristin Thompson focuses on how the film's editing holds its unorthodox narrative structure together. Davies has said that "when you see a dissolve, whether you realize it or not, you always read it as time passing, either forward or backward," and here, Thompson observes the ways in which the technique allows The Long Day Closes to mimic the fluidity and emotional texture of memory.
 
Tuesday, August 28
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Night Mayor* and Je t'aime, je t'aime

Weird science powers these films from two of cinema's most original dreamers. In Guy Maddin's Night Mayor (2009), a black-and-white short set in 1939 Winnipeg, a Bosnian-immigrant inventor learns how to use the northern lights to broadcast images across his adopted homeland of Canada. In Alain Resnais's 1968 Je t'aime, je t'aime-a major influence on a later head-trip down memory lane, Michel Gondry's 2004 film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind-a group of scientists persuade a suicidal man to take part in a mysterious time-travel experiment.
 
Wednesday, August 29
Army of Shadows: Edition #385

This masterpiece by Jean-Pierre Melville about the French Resistance went unreleased in the United States for thirty-seven years, until its triumphant theatrical debut in 2006. Atmospheric and gripping, Army of Shadows is Melville's most personal film, featuring Lino Ventura, Paul Meurisse, Jean-Pierre Cassel, and the incomparable Simone Signoret as intrepid underground fighters who must grapple with their conception of honor in their battle against Hitler's regime. Supplemental features: a short program on Melville and the film, a rare short documentary shot on the front lines during the final days of German-occupied France, and more.
 
Friday, August 31
Friday Night Double Feature: Some Like It Hot and Insignificance

Marilyn Monroe and her enduring legacy step into the spotlight in this week's double bill. One of the most iconic Hollywood films of all time, Billy Wilder's 1959 comedy Some Like It Hotfeatures Monroe as the jazz singer Sugar "Kane" Kowalczyk, whose all-female band is joined by two musicians (Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon) dressed as women in order to hide from the mob. Nicolas Roeg's characteristically idiosyncratic 1985 chamber piece Insignificance takes place in a New York City hotel room, where characters based on four larger-than-life figures of the 1950s-Albert Einstein (Michael Emil), Joe DiMaggio (Gary Busey), Joseph McCarthy (Curtis), and Monroe herself (Theresa Russell)-reflect on their lives, fame, and the era they've come to signify.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
August 1
Tootsie, Sydney Pollack, 1982
The World, the Flesh and the Devil, Ranald MacDougall, 1959
 
August 7
Hunger, Peter Foldes, 1974
 
August 14
Lick the Star, Sofia Coppola, 1998
 
August 21
The Moonshiners, Juho Kuosmanen, 2017
A Private Function, Malcolm Mowbray, 1984
 
August 28
Night Mayor, Guy Maddin, 2009
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.

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June 02, 2018

STREAMING ON AMAZON PRIME JUNE 2018

Amazon-prime-video

Here's the list of films streaming on Amazon Prime beginning June 1. The bolded titles are my personal picks. Bon appetite.

June 1

1492: Conquest Of Paradise

2 Days In The Valley

Allan Quatermain And The Lost City Of Gold

All Or Nothing: New Zealand All Blacks: Season 1

As Good As Dead

August Rush

Babylon 5: Seasons 1-5

Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans

Beer For My Horses

Beowulf

Black Widow (AKA: Before It Had a Name)

Blitz

Blood And Glory

Blue Like Jazz

Breakdown

Burnt Offerings

Cavedweller

Chinese Box

Clown At Midnight

Command Performance

Danger Zone

Day Of The Dead

Doctor Zhivago

Dog Watch

Double Identity

Double Jeopardy

Dreams And Memories Of Where The Red Fern Grows

Drop Zone

Escape From Alcatraz

Event Horizon

Flickers

Forces Of Nature

Flood

Hans Christian Andersen: My Life As A Fairytale

Hard Rain

Harley Davidson And The Marlboro Man

House Of D

I Am David

Ladies Man

Leprechaun

Leprechaun 2

Leprechaun 3

Leprechaun 4: In Space

Leprechaun 5: In The Hood

Leprechaun 6: Back 2 Tha Hood

Leprechaun: Origins

Mousehunt

Mutant Species

Nacho Libre

Nurse 3D

Panic

Rare Birds

Religulous

Rescue Me: Seasons 1-9

Revenge Of The Pink Panther

Ring Of Fire

Saturday Night Fever

Serving Sara

Space Jam

Stanley & Iris

Survivor

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber Of Fleet Street

Tamara

Tears Of The Sun

The 4th Floor

The Age Of Innocence

The Ant Bully

The Ashram

The ‘Burbs

The Care Bears Movie

The Disaster Artist

The Eye 2

The Frozen Ground

The Iceman

The Natural

The Pink Panther Strikes Again

The Running Man

The Young Karl Marx

Tilt

Universal Soldier

Vampire In Brooklyn

The Waltons: Seasons 1-9

War, Inc.

Wonder Wheel

June 3

Lady Bird

Max 2: White House Hero

Stargate

June 5

Lions For Lambs

June 8

Lost In Oz: Season 1

June 9

Braven

Precious

Simon Says

June 15

Goliath: Season 2

June 16

Nostalgia

Transformers: The Last Knight

June 18

Suits: Season 7

June 26

Shutter Island

If You Give A Mouse A Cookie: Season 1

March 28, 2018

APRIL PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
APRIL PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Nicholas Ray's In A Lonely Place
Adventures in Moviegoing with Adam Gopnik, and five color films by Ozu!
 
Sunday, April 1
Adventures in Moviegoing with Megan AbbottIn a Lonely Place*

Cinema has been an important part of Megan Abbott's life since her days growing up in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, when her family would make trips to the local revival house. In her episode of Adventures in Moviegoing, the award-winning novelist spoke with programmer Michael Sragow about films she loves, including ones that have influenced her approach to crime fiction. This month, we're adding one of her all-time favorites to her personally curated series: Nicholas Ray's emotionally charged adaptation of the Dorothy B. Hughes thriller In a Lonely Place. A brilliant, turbulent mix of suspenseful noir and devastating melodrama, fueled by powerhouse performances from Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame, the film follows a gifted but washed-up screenwriter who becomes the prime suspect in a Tinseltown murder. Watch it on the Channel with a new introduction by Abbott.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, April 3
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Monkey Love Experiments* and Koko: A Talking Gorilla

Two different takes on the complex relationship between humans and primates. Combining stop-motion animation, live-action, and CG, Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson's BAFTA-nominated 2014 short Monkey Love Experiments tells the story of a misguided monkey who believes he's destined for the moon. In Koko: A Talking Gorilla, acclaimed director Barbet Schroeder and cinematographer Nestor Almendros create an intimate documentary portrait of the world-famous title subject, exploring the ethical concerns surrounding a controversial experiment that sought to teach her human communication through American Sign Language.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, April 4
Metropolitan*: Edition #326
 
One of the great American independent films of the 1990s, the surprise hit Metropolitan, by writer-director Whit Stillman, is a sparkling comedic chronicle of a young man's romantic misadventures while trying to fit in to New York City's debutante society. Stillman's deft, literate dialogue and hilariously highbrow observations earned this first film an Academy Award nomination for best original screenplay. Beneath the wit and sophistication, though, lies a tender tale of adolescent anxiety. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Stillman, editor Christopher Tellefsen, and actors Chris Eigeman and Taylor Nichols; and rare outtakes and alternate casting, with commentary by Stillman.
 
Thursday, April 5
Art-House America: Gold Town Nickelodeon, Juneau, Alaska
Local Hero, Bill Forsyth, 1983
 
Last year, the Channel-exclusive series Art-House America took a trip to Juneau, Alaska, where intrepid programmer Colette Costa runs a downtown movie theater catering to year-round locals in the country's cruise-ship capital. Alongside our documentary portrait of this bustling venue, Costa has been programming an ongoing selection of films that capture "what it feels like to live in Alaska." The latest addition to the series is Bill Forsyth's 1983 Local Hero, presented in a limited engagement. Mixing wry comedy and unexpected pathos, and featuring music by Mark Knopfler, this stirring ode to Forsyth's native Scotland follows a Texas oil executive (Peter Riegert) whose life is changed when his boss (Burt Lancaster) sends him to a Scottish village to buy up land for a new refinery.
Friday, April 6
Friday Night Double Feature: Night Moves and My Night at Maud's
 
"I saw a Rohmer film once. It was kinda like watching paint dry." So says Gene Hackman, famously, in Arthur Penn's 1975 neo-noir Night Moves, a film that contains striking parallels and references to the French director's wonderfully talky 1969 My Night at Maud's. Penn's New Hollywood masterpiece centers on Harry Moseby (Hackman), a retired professional football player turned Los Angeles private investigator who finds himself embroiled in the complex case of a runaway teen. One of the most acclaimed entries in the influential series "Six Moral Tales," Rohmer's film features Jean-Louis Trintignant as a pious Catholic engineer whose rigid ethical standards are challenged when he unwittingly spends the night at the apartment of a bold, brunette divorcée.
 
Monday, April 9
Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins: The Summer of Flying Fish*
 
Not long after winning an Oscar last year for Moonlight, Barry Jenkins joined Criterion's Peter Becker for an intimate conversation about his personal journey as a movie lover, the filmmakers who have influenced his style, and finding his relationship to cinema as a person of color. Alongside some of his favorite classics, he championed some little-seen gems, including Chilean director Marcela Said's 2013 narrative feature debut, The Summer of Flying Fish. A vivid coming-of-age story and a powerful allegory about environmental destruction, this richly atmospheric drama follows a teenage girl as she goes on vacation with her father, a wealthy landowner who becomes obsessed with eliminating the carp fish from his artificial lagoon. Featuring a new introduction from Jenkins, the film streams on the Channel in a limited engagement.
*Premiering on the Criterion Channel this month.
Tuesday, April 10
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Manhatta and The Naked City
The New York of the past comes to life in these two portraits, shot in different periods in the city's history. A pioneering work of American avant-garde cinema, the silent short Manhatta (1921)- directed by photographer Paul Strand and painter Charles Sheeler-takes in the modern metropolis from a variety of soaring perspectives, assembling a miniature symphony of the city in all its industrial splendor. Shot on location more than a quarter of a century later, Jules Dassin's masterpiece The Naked City (1948), a noir procedural inspired by Italian neorealism, offers a grittier view of Lower Manhattan from street level.
 
Wednesday, April 11
The 400 Blows: Edition #5
 
François Truffaut's first feature is also his most personal. Told from the point of view of Truffaut's cinematic counterpart, Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud), The 400 Blows sensitively re-creates the trials of Truffaut's own childhood, unsentimentally portraying aloof parents, oppressive teachers, and petty crime. The film marked Truffaut's passage from leading critic to trailblazing auteur of the French New Wave. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: two audio commentaries, one by cinema professor Brian Stonehill and the other by director François Truffaut's lifelong friend Robert Lachenay; rare audition footage of Jean-Pierre Léaud, Patrick Auffay, and Richard Kanayan; newsreel footage from the film's showing at Cannes; and more.
 
Friday, April 13
Friday Night Double Feature: M and Peeping Tom
 
These unsettling and widely influential thrillers give viewers a glimpse inside the psychopathic mind. Fritz Lang's expressionist touchstone M (1931) revolves around the Berlin manhunt for a murderer of children (Peter Lorre), in the process offering an analysis of the man's tortured psyche. In Peeping Tom (1960), a controversial film that nearly ended his career but is now regarded as a masterpiece, Michael Powell offers a Freudian portrait of a London serial killer (Carl Boehm), a cameraman with a predilection for recording the terror of his victims.

Monday, April 16
In Search of Ozu
 
In this original documentary, filmmaker Daniel Raim delves into Yasujiro Ozu's remarkable late work, in which the master made the leap from black and white to color. In his stirring tribute to the great filmmaker, Raim examines Ozu's life and work through archival treasures such as his diary and the red teakettle from the family drama Equinox Flower (1958); sits down with Ozu's nephew and the producer of the director's gently elegiac final film, An Autumn Afternoon (1962); and interweaves many scenes and images from the vibrant and humane films with which the director capped his career. Alongside the documentary, we present five of Ozu's color films, including Equinox Flower, Floating Weeds (1959), Late Autumn (1960), The End of Summer (1961), and An Autumn Afternoon (1962). 
 
Tuesday, April 17
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Casus belli* and Weekend
 
Two critiques of consumerism that make dazzling use of tracking shots. In Greek filmmaker Yorgos Zois's sinuous debut short, Casus belli (2010), an apparently continuous dolly shot observes different queues of people, from the supermarket checkout line to the wait at the betting-agency counter-and back again-wryly revealing the social divisions among those standing in place. Jean-Luc Godard's acid comedy Weekend (1967), in which a bourgeois couple set out to secure an inheritance from a dying relative, opens with a famous seven-minute-long shot of a massive traffic pileup, setting the tone for the entropic satire to follow.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, April 18
The Hero: Edition #911
 
In this psychologically rich character study, written and directed by Satyajit Ray, Bengali film star Uttam Kumar draws on his real-world celebrity to play Arindam Mukherjee, a matinee idol on the brink of his first flop. When Mukherjee boards an overnight train to Delhi to accept an award, a journalist (Sharmila Tagore) approaches him seeking an exclusive interview, which initiates a conversation that sends the actor reeling down a path of self-examination. Seamlessly integrating rueful flashbacks and surreal dream sequences with the quietly revelatory stories of the train's other passengers, The Hero is a graceful meditation on art, fame, and regret from one of world cinema's most keenly perceptive filmmakers. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a program featuring an interview from 2008 with actor Sharmila Tagore, and a program featuring film scholar Meheli Sen.
 
Friday, April 20
Friday Night Double Feature: Babette's Feast and The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover

Food represents the highest of arts and the basest of cruelties in this cinematic banquet. Gabriel Axel's Oscar-winning Babette's Feast, adapted from a short story by Isak Dinesen, tells the moving story of a French housekeeper with a mysterious past who brings quiet revolution in the form of one exquisite meal to a circle of starkly pious villagers in late-nineteenth-century Denmark. It's paired with an outrageously decadent masterpiece from Peter Greenaway, who stages a modern Jacobean revenge tragedy in a lavish restaurant, where a brutal gangster (Michael Gambon) holds court while his wife (Helen Mirren) sneaks away to her paramour. With vivid cinematography by Sacha Vierny and a hypnotic Michael Nyman score, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover culminates in a memorably gruesome feast.
 
Monday, April 23
Observations on Film Art No. 18: Staging and Performance in Ivan the Terrible, Part II

Sergei Eisenstein's final film, a two-part biopic of the notorious Tsar Ivan IV, is one of the revolutionary director's boldest experiments in film form, frequently departing from the codes of cinematic realism. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at how great filmmakers use cinematic devices and techniques, scholar David Bordwell examines Eisenstein's concept of "expressive movement," and shows how the director uses it to stage elaborate set pieces that incorporate the languages of painting and dance.
 
Tuesday, April 24
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Ghost Trip and Kings of the Road

These spare, existential road movies take in vast landscapes in stunning black and white. Bill Morrison's eerie Ghost Trip, a rare "fiction" film from an artist best known for his use of archival material, follows a mysterious driver on an American odyssey from coast to coast, passing through deserts, casinos, and graveyards along the way. Then, the capstone of Wim Wenders's Road Trilogy accompanies a film projector repairman and a depressed psychologist as they roam aimlessly from one movie theater to another across a melancholy Germany still haunted by war.
 
Wednesday, April 25
An Actor's Revenge: Edition #912

A uniquely prolific and chameleonic figure of world cinema, Kon Ichikawa delivered a burst of stylistic bravado with this intricate tale of betrayal and retribution. Set in the cloistered world of nineteenth-century kabuki theater, the film charts a female impersonator's attempts to avenge the deaths of his parents, who were driven to insanity and suicide by a trio of corrupt men. Ichikawa takes the conventions of melodrama and turns them on their head, bringing the hero's fractured psyche to life in boldly experimental widescreen compositions infused with kaleidoscopic color, pop-art influences, and meticulous choreography. Anchored by a magnificently androgynous performance by Kazuo Hasegawa, reprising a role he had played on-screen three decades earlier, An Actor's Revenge is an eye-popping examination of how the illusions of art intersect with life. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: A rare 1999 Directors Guild of Japan interview with director Kon Ichikawa, conducted by film critic Yuki Mori; and an interview with critic, filmmaker, and festival programmer Tony Rayns.
 
Thursday, April 26
Adventures in Moviegoing with Adam Gopnik

This month's guest curator, author and longtime New Yorker contributor Adam Gopnik, is a writer of omnivorous interests. For his selection of favorite films, he handpicked gems such as Jacques Demy's The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and Jean Cocteau's Orpheus, and then sat down with Antonio Monda, artistic director of the Rome Film Festival, to discuss a lifetime of moviegoing. From watching European cinema on television with his family, to seeing Singin' in the Rain during his adolescence in Paris, to his first date with the woman he would go on to marry (they saw Jean Vigo's achingly romantic L'Atalante), Gopnik chronicles his infatuation with cinema, a medium whose storytelling methods he often seeks to emulate in his own writing.
 
Friday, April 27
Friday Night Double Feature: Tokyo Drifter and The Long Good Friday

This gangster-movie double bill finds two career criminals attempting to go straight, only to get sucked back into the underworld. In Tokyo Drifter (1966),Seijun Suzuki's delirious pop-art riff on the yakuza genre, reformed hit man Tetsu gets called back from retirement to do battle with a rival gang, resulting in an onslaught of giddily stylized action. Then, a magnetic Bob Hoskins stars in John Mackenzie's The Long Good Friday (1980) as a vicious London mob boss whose best-laid plans to cross over into legitimate business get blown to smithereens over the course of one agonizing, bloody day.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
April 1
In a Lonely Place, Nicholas Ray, 1950
 
April 3
Monkey Love Experiments, Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson, 2014
 
April 4
Metropolitan, Whit Stillman, 1990
 
April 9
The Summer of Flying Fish, Marcela Said, 2013
 
April 17
Casus belli, Yorgos Zois, 2010
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE
For more information on FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel,

  

March 20, 2018

MARCH PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
MARCH PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes five films by Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 
Adventures in Moviegoing with Rebecca Miller, and Ronald Bronstein's Frownland!
 
Monday, March 19
Meet the Filmmakers: Apichatpong Weerasethakul

In the latest entry of Meet the Filmmakers, Canadian actor and filmmaker Connor Jessup profiles Apichatpong Weerasethakul, a maverick of Thai cinema who explores the slippery nature of time and consciousness with a sublimely idiosyncratic, often surreal approach to film form. Shot in the Colombian jungle, where Apichatpong was scouting locations last year for his next project, this rare glimpse at the director's creative world delves into the dreams and desires that fuel his work. Along with the documentary, the Criterion Channel presents a sampling of his films, including Mysterious Object at Noon (2000), Tropical Malady (2004), 
Syndromes and a Century (2006), the Cannes award-winningUncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010), and Cemetery of Splendor (2015).
 
Tuesday, March 20
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Colour of His Hair* and Victim

These stirring indictments of social oppression explore a shameful period in British history when homosexuality was forbidden by law. Based on an unrealized script written in 1964 for the Homosexual Law Reform Society, an organization that campaigned for the decriminalization of sexual relations between men, Sam Ashby's 2017 short The Colour of His Hair offers an impressionistic portrait of a turbulent era through a mix of narrative and documentary techniques. Ashby's film is paired with an essential document from that era, Basil Dearden's 1961 Victim, which stars Dirk Bogarde as a member of a large group of closeted London men who become targets of a blackmailer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, March 21
Harlan County USA: Edition #334

Barbara Kopple's Oscar-winning Harlan County USA unflinchingly documents a grueling coal miners' strike in a small Kentucky town. With unprecedented access, Kopple and her crew captured the miners' sometimes violent struggles with strikebreakers, local police, and company thugs. Featuring a haunting soundtrack-with legendary country and bluegrass artists Hazel Dickens, Merle Travis, Sarah Gunning, and Florence Reece-the film is a heartbreaking record of the thirteen-month struggle between a community fighting to survive and a corporation dedicated to the bottom line. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Kopple and editor Nancy Baker; The Making of "Harlan County, USA," a documentary featuring interviews with Kopple, crew members and strike participants featured in the film; a video interview with legendary bluegrass singer-songwriter Hazel Dickens; never-before-seen outtakes from the film; and more.
 
Thursday, March 22
Art-House America: Northwest Film Forum, Seattle, Washington 

All around the country, in big cities and small towns, independent art-house theaters are thriving hubs of moviegoing, each with its own story to tell. With this series, Criterion goes wherever film culture is happening and brings back brief documentary portraits of different local art houses along with a selection of films handpicked by their programmers. The latest episode pays a visit to Seattle's Northwest Film Forum, where an innovative team, led by programmer and executive director Courtney Sheehan, has turned a grassroots movie theater into a vibrant venue for a wide range of visual culture, as well as live events, education initiatives, and political activism. The NWFF demonstrates the exciting possibilities of cinema as a folk art that can engage directly with the community, and its diverse programs have included showcases of Philippine cinema and films by local and indigenous filmmakers. The first entry in an ongoing series that NWFF will be programming on the Channel is Robinson Devor's 2005 Police Beat*, a disarmingly surreal portrait of a West African immigrant who finds work in Seattle as a bicycle cop. Also available on the Channel are the previous episodes in the series, celebrating the Walter Reade Theater, in New York City, and the Gold Town Nickelodeon, in Juneau, Alaska.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
Friday, March 23
Friday Night Double Feature: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and A Married Couple
 
Marriage becomes an emotional battleground in these tightly focused studies of domestic discord. In 1966, Mike Nichols made his debut as a film director by bringing Edward Albee's Broadway sensation to the screen, with celebrity couple Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton taking on the venomous leading roles. Allan King's "actuality drama" A Married Couple (1969) is a revealing documentary about Billy and Antoinette Edwards, ex-bohemians struggling with the demands of marriage and the changing gender roles of the 1960s. Jaw-droppingly intense in its examination of marital conflict, King's film finds just as much drama in a real couple's daily life as Nichols does in Albee's play.
 
Monday, March 26
Observations on Film Art No. 17: Narrative Motifs in Chungking Express

Wong Kar-wai's Chungking Express(1994) captures the whiplash rhythms and tenuous connections of urban life in a bifurcated story that follows two heartsick Hong Kong cops (Takeshi Kaneshiro and Tony Leung) who cross paths at the Midnight Express take-out restaurant stand, where the ethereal pixie waitress Faye (Faye Wong) works. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at how great filmmakers use cinematic devices and techniques, scholar David Bordwell isolates the recurring motifs that wind throughout the film and shows how Wong uses them to unite the story's seemingly unrelated halves.
  
Monday, March 26
Frownland*
Since its under-the-radar release in 2007, Ronald Bronstein's directorial debut has become a touchstone of contemporary independent cinema, admired by a generation of young filmmakers and winning rapturous praise from influential publications like Cahiers du cinéma for its uncompromising vision. Centering on the cringeworthy misadventures of a neurotic and staggeringly inarticulate coupon salesman (a remarkable Dore Mann), this character study is a bleak but unforgettable New York story-one that anticipates later works by filmmakers such as Josh and Benny Safdie, with whom Bronstein has gone on to collaborate as an actor and writer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, March 27
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Lira's Forest* and Tropical Malady

Animal spirits enact rituals of love and death in this pair of sylvan fables by the director and the subject of this month's new Meet the Filmmakers episode, Connor Jessup and Apichatpong Weerasethakul. Jessup's short Lira's Forest (2017) follows an ailing woman who receives a visit from a mysterious spirit and undergoes an otherworldly transformation. Apichatpong's
Tropical Malady(2004) follows the tender romance that blossoms between two young men in the Thai countryside, then plunges into the jungle where their love story is reconfigured as the tale of a hunter's search for a legendary tiger. Also on the Channel, Jessup, a devoted student of Apichatpong's beguiling approach to cinema, profiles the Thai master in this month's installment of Meet the Filmmakers.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, March 28
The Passion of Joan of Arc: Edition #62

Spiritual rapture and institutional hypocrisy come to stark, vivid life in one of the most transcendent masterpieces of the silent era. Chronicling the trial of Joan of Arc in the hours leading up to her execution, Danish master Carl Theodor Dreyer depicts her torment with startling immediacy, employing an array of techniques-expressionistic lighting, interconnected sets, painfully intimate close-ups-to immerse viewers in her subjective experience. Anchoring Dreyer's audacious formal experimentation is a legendary performance by Renée Falconetti, whose haunted face channels both the agony and the ecstasy of martyrdom.
SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: three scores: Richard Einhorn's Voices of Light, one by Goldfrapp's Will Gregory and Portishead's Adrian Utley, and one by composer and pianist Mie Yanashita; an audio commentary from 1999 by film scholar Casper Tybjerg; an interview from 1995 with actor Renée Falconetti's daughter and biographer, Hélène Falconetti; and more.

Thursday, March 29
Adventures in Moviegoing with Rebecca Miller
 
Filmmaker, visual artist, actor, and novelist Rebecca Miller sat down with us to share a personal history of moviegoing that stretches back to childhood. Miller's parents, playwright Arthur Miller and photographer Inge Morath, initiated her into art-house cinema at an early age, fostering the eclectic taste that would go on to inform her creative life. Miller is fascinated with movies that stay anchored in emotional realism while violating the codes of naturalism. Here she explains how her work in various art forms has influenced her filmmaking, and selects a series of favorites that speak to her abiding interest in evoking psychic states on-screen, including John Cassavetes's Opening Night, Agnès Varda's Vagabond, and Jane Campion's Sweetie.
 
Thursday, March 29
By Rebecca Miller

The subject of this month's Adventures in Moviegoing, writer-director Rebecca Miller transitioned from visual art to filmmaking with her 1995 directorial debut, Angela*, a haunting tale of a young girl who retreats into her fantasies to cope with her emotionally volatile mother. Miller's vivid evocations of complex psychological states are a hallmark of her subsequent features, including the 2005 drama The Ballad of Jack and Rose*, a devastating look at the twilight of the 1960s counterculture in which Daniel Day-Lewis plays a Scottish farmer whose discovery of new love throws his intensely close relationship with his teenage daughter into chaos.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, March 30
Friday Night Double Feature: The Phantom of Liberty and Tampopo

When Juzo Itami set out to make a movie about human appetite and culinary culture, he couldn't figure out how to string together the episodes he had imagined, until he remembered The Phantom of Liberty, which struck him as "the kind of film where the last thing of the scene before leads to the next event-that kind of quick-change thing." Luis Buñuel's penultimate film is an audacious satire of bourgeois norms, from the hypocrisy of conventional morality to the arbitrariness of social arrangements, as told through a series of non sequiturs. Inspired by Buñuel's "quick-change" structure, Itami interspersed the story of Tampopo's eponymous heroine with the erotic exploits of a gastronome gangster and a string of standalone skits, spicing the broth of his "ramen western" with comic flavor.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

March 6
Art, Adrian Sitaru, 2014
 
March 13
Home, Daniel Mulloy, 2016
 
March 14
Science Is Fiction: 23 Films by Jean Painlevé
 
March 19
Frownland, Ronald Bronstein, 2007
 
March 20
The Colour of His Hair, Sam Ashby, 2017
 
March 22
Police Beat, Robinson Devor, 2005
 
March 27
Lira's Forest, Connor Jessup, 2017
 
March 29
Angela, Rebecca Miller, 1995
The Ballad of Jack and Rose, Rebecca Miller, 2005
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE

ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. 

ABOUT FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck is a subscription on-demand service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive and constantly refreshed library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary arthouse, indie, foreign, cult and classic Hollywood films. FilmStruck is the exclusive streaming home to the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.
ABOUT THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium-from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to FilmStruck, the streaming service developed in collaboration with Turner Classic Movies - Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer's appreciation of the art of film.

November 29, 2017

DECEMBER PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
Includes Godzilla and fourteen other kaiju classics,
Aki Kaurismäki's Le Havre, and Nagisa Oshima's Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence!

Friday, December 1
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World*: Criterion Collection Edition #692

Stanley Kramer followed his harrowing Oscar winner Judgment at Nuremberg with the most grandly harebrained movie ever made, a pileup of slapstick and borscht-belt-y one-liners about a group of strangers fighting tooth and nail over buried treasure. Performed by a nonpareil cast, including Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Ethel Merman, Mickey Rooney, Spencer Tracy, Jonathan Winters, and a boatload of other playing-to-the-rafters comedy legends, Kramer's wildly uncharacteristic film is an exhilarating epic of tomfoolery. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary featuring It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World aficionados Mark Evanier, Michael Schlesinger, and Paul Scrabo; a documentary on the film's visual and sound effects, featuring interviews with visual-effects specialist Craig Barron and sound designer Ben Burtt; an excerpt from a 1974 talk show hosted by director Stanley Kramer and featuring Mad World actors Sid Caesar, Buddy Hackett, and Jonathan Winters; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, December 1
Friday Night Double Feature: Dodsworth and David Golder

Private woes take their toll on two successful self-made businessmen in this pair of domestic dramas from the 1930s. In William Wyler's Oscar-winning adaptation of Sinclair Lewis's Dodsworth (1936), Walter Huston stars as a Midwestern auto magnate who retires and embarks on a European voyage with his wannabe-chic wife, only to find that the two of them are growing further and further apart. In Julien Duviver's first sound film, the moody melodrama David Golder (1931), Harry Baur plays a ruthless banker grappling with business and family troubles.
 
Monday, December 4
A Night to Remember: Criterion Collection Edition #7

On April 14, 1912, just before midnight, the "unsinkable" Titanic struck an iceberg, plunging to the bottom of the sea and taking with it more than 1,500 of its 2,200 passengers. In his unforgettable render­ing of Walter Lord's book, British director Roy Ward Baker depicts with sensitivity, awe, and a fine sense of tragedy the ship's last hours. Featuring remarkably restrained performances, A Night to Remember (1958) is cinema's subtlest and best dramatization of this monumental twentieth-century catastrophe. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Don Lynch and Ken Marschall, author and illustrator of "Titanic": An Illustrated History; The Making of "A Night to Remember"(1993), a sixty-minute documentary featuring producer William MacQuitty's rare behind-the-scenes footage; an archival interview with Titanic survivor Eva Hart; and more.
 
Monday, December 4
Masterclass: Kenneth Turan and Marcel Ophuls on Disagreeable Truths

Marcel Ophuls talks to Los Angeles Times critic Kenneth Turan at UCLA about why and how he moved from making commercial feature films to chronicling occupied Europe and the Holocaust in epic documentaries like The Sorrow and the Pity and The Memory of Justice. Along the way, he also opens up about everything from his interview techniques and his experience as a second-generation auteur (the son of Max) to his thoughts on assessing guilt and responsibility for genocide and war crimes. Previous entries in our Masterclass series include conversations between Kirsten Johnson and Michael Moore and Alex Ross Perry and Robert Greene.
 
Tuesday, December 5
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Above and Cameraperson

With a keen eye for landscape and character, Kirsten Johnson's work documents political turmoil throughout the globe, calling into question the ethical stakes of nonfiction filmmaking. In The Above (2015), a mysterious surveillance blimp with unknown capabilities hovers above Kabul as the Afghans below go about their daily lives. In her breakthrough feature, Cameraperson (2016), she assembles footage captured throughout her twenty-five-year career, weaving together intimate moments from her private life with haunting images from her journeys abroad as a documentary cinematographer.
 
Wednesday, December 6
Le Havre: Criterion Collection Edition #619

With Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki returning to theaters this winter with his latest, The Other Side of Hope, we're revisiting his acclaimed previous film, which initiated his ongoing exploration of global migration and displacement. In this warmhearted comic yarn, fate throws a young African refugee into the path of a kindly old bohemian who shines shoes for a living in a French harbor city. A political fairy tale that exists somewhere between the reality of contemporary France and the classic French cinema of the past, Le Havre (2011) is a charming, deadpan delight and one of the director's finest films. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an interview with actor André Wilms; footage from the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, including a press conference and a French television interview with cast and crew; and more.
 
Thursday, December 7
Laughter First!: Harold Lloyd's Glasses Character Turns 100

Celebrate the centennial of Harold Lloyd's "Glasses Character" - the resourceful go-getter who always got the girl - with Kevin Brownlow and David Gill's lucid and entertaining documentary Harold Lloyd: The Third Genius. Crisply narrated by Lindsay Anderson, the film traces the performer's development all the way back to his early dramatic days and through his slapstick experiments, until he puts on horn-rimmed glasses and invents the figure who would go on to define his career. Brownlow and Gill pay exuberant tribute to the great silent clown, who was as wildly innovative as Buster Keaton and as skilled with sentiment as Chaplin, but had a resilience of his own that fit America's roaring twenties better than any other screen personality. The Third Genius streams alongside a selection of Lloyd's films: Safety Last! (1923), Girl Shy (1924), The Freshman (1925), The Kid Brother(1927), and Speedy (1928).
 
Friday, December 8
Friday Night Double Feature: The Stunt Man and 

Film sets become hazy frontiers between illusion and reality in these dizzying movies about movies. Richard Rush's Escher-like vortex The Stunt Man (1980) features Peter O'Toole at his most virtuosic, as a megalomaniacal director who manipulates a veteran on the run from the law into serving as a stuntman. Federico Fellini's kaleidoscopic  (1963) - perhaps the most gloriously expansive vision of itself the cinema has ever produced - weaves together the dreams, memories, and fantasies of a director (Marcello Mastroianni) whose latest project is collapsing around him.
 
Friday, December 8
Godzilla and Beyond*

This month, we're offering you the chance to go on a veritable viewing rampage, with this massive collection of fourteen kaiju classics. Running from Ishiro Honda's original Godzilla(1954) to the director's sci-fi drama Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975), these spectacular Toho productions track the King of the Monsters and a number of his fellow mutants as they evolved over the course of two decades, reflecting all the while many of the anxieties of a postwar world.  
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Saturday, December 9
Split Screen Season Nine

Two decades after it premiered on IFC, the pioneering television series Split Screen has a streaming home on the Channel. In this priceless time capsule, host John Pierson takes viewers on an irreverent trip through filmmaking communities and movie-loving culture at the turn of the millennium. This month, we present the show's penultimate season, which features appearances by Kevin Smith and Ross McElwee, and a hilarious segment in which Christopher Walken heads to the kitchen as the host of his own cooking show.
 
Monday, December 11
The Leopard: Criterion Collection Edition #235

An epic on the grandest possible scale, Luchino Visconti's 1963 masterpiece recreates the tumultuous years of Italy's Risorgimento - when the aristocracy lost its grip and the middle classes rose and formed a unified, democratic Italy. Burt Lancaster stars as the aging prince watching his culture and fortune wane in the face of a new generation, represented by his upstart nephew (Alain Delon) and his beautiful fiancée (Claudia Cardinale). Awarded the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, this lavish adaptation of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa's novel is presented in two distinct incarnations: Visconti's original Italian version and the alternate English-language version. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by film scholar Peter Cowie; an hour-long documentary featuring interviews with Claudia Cardinale, screenwriter Suso Ceccho D'Amico, Rotunno, filmmaker Sydney Pollack, and many others; and more.
 
Tuesday, December 12
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Return to Glennascaul* and The Third Man

Orson Welles brings his incomparable charisma to two dark gems. In Hilton Edwards's short Return to Glennascaul (1951), the actor stars as himself driving through the Irish countryside, where he picks up a man with car trouble and a chilling ghost story to tell; in Carol Reed's shadow-drenched noir masterpiece The Third Man (1949), he delivers one of his most iconic performances as the enigmatic Harry Lime, whose sudden death draws a childhood chum into a perilous journey through postwar Vienna.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, December 13
Phoenix*: Criterion Collection Edition #809

Christian Petzold's evocative 2014 drama, set in rubble-strewn Berlin in 1945, is like no other film about post-World War II Jewish-German identity. After surviving Auschwitz, a former cabaret singer (Nina Hoss) has her disfigured face reconstructed and returns to her war-ravaged hometown to seek out her gentile husband, who may or may not have betrayed her to the Nazis. Without recognizing her, he enlists her to play his wife in a bizarre hall-of-shattered-mirrors story that is as richly metaphorical as it is preposterously engrossing. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a new introduction by critic Imogen Sara Smith; a conversation between director Christian Petzold and actor Nina Hoss; The Making of "Phoenix," a 2014 documentary featuring interviews with Petzold, Hoss, actors Nina Kunzendorf and Ronald Zehrfeld, and production designer K. D. Gruber; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, December 14
I Am Curious: Criterion Collection Edition #179

Seized by customs upon entry to the United States, subject of a heated court battle, and banned in cities across the United States, Vilgot Sjöman's I Am Curious - Yellow is one of the most controversial films of all time. This landmark document of Swedish society during the sexual revolution tells the story of a searching and rebellious young woman, and her personal quest to understand the social and political conditions in 1960s Sweden, as well as her bold exploration of her own sexual identity. In celebration of its fiftieth anniversary, I Am Curious - Yellow is presented here with its companion piece I Am Curious - Blue, a parallel film featuring the same characters and in which the lines between documentary and fiction are even further blurred. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: excerpts from director Vilgot Sjöman's Self Portrait 92, a documentary made for Swedish television; a video introduction by the director; a selected scene audio commentary by Sjöman; and more.
 
Friday, December 15
Friday Night Double Feature: Fitzcarraldo and Burden of Dreams

The limits of human endurance are put to the test in German iconoclast Werner Herzog's 1982 Fitzcarraldo, an epic portrait of a rubber baron's attempts to build an opera house in the Peruvian jungle. The film was the result of a notoriously nightmarish five-year production, glimpses of which are captured in Les Blank's Burden of Dreams, an unsparing behind-the-scenes look at Herzog's quest to bring his impossible vision to the screen.
 
Monday, December 18
Creative Marriages: Juzo Itami and Nobuko Miyamoto

Juzo Itami became the most talked-about Japanese director of the eighties and nineties when he and his wife, actor Nobuko Miyamoto, created a string of audacious movies centered on independent women who were smart and passionate about their work. In the latest installment of Creative Marriages, we're celebrating their partnership in both life and cinema. Watch their 1985 international breakthrough, Tampopo, a mouth-watering "ramen western" starring Miyamoto as a single mother who becomes a first-class noodle chef with a lot of help from her friends. Also on view is the seriocomic social thriller A Taxing Woman (1987), a box-office smash that staged a frontal attack on the contemporary obsession with making money. You can also check out our previous Creative Marriages programs highlighting Federico Fellini and Giulietta Masina, Roger Vadim and Brigitte Bardot, and Jean Cocteau and Jean Marais.
 
Tuesday, December 19
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Time Piece and Tom Jones

Two masters deliver flights of playful cinematic style with their own witty sensibilities. In the Oscar-winning 1963 Tom Jones, British New Wave pioneer Tony Richardson updates Henry Fielding's picaresque eighteenth-century novel with an ebullient, fourth-wall-breaking irreverence. And in the Oscar-nominated 1965 short Time Piece, which features a parody of one of the most memorable scenes in Tom Jones, legendary puppeteer Jim Henson delivers a fast-paced, rhythmically edited tale of a young man desperately trying to escape the passage of time.
 
Wednesday, December 20
Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence*: Criterion Collection Edition #535

In this captivating, skewed World War II drama from Nagisa Oshima, David Bowie regally embodies a British officer interned by the Japanese as a POW. Rock star Ryuichi Sakamoto (who also composed this film's hypnotic score) plays the camp commander, obsessed with the mysterious blond major, while Tom Conti is a British lieutenant colonel who tries to bridge the emotional and language divides between captor and prisoner. Also featuring actor-director Takeshi Kitano in his first dramatic role, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence(1983) is a multilayered, brutal, at times erotic tale of culture clash, and one of Oshima's greatest successes. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: The Oshima Gang, a 1983 making-of featurette; video interviews with producer Jeremy Thomas, screenwriter Paul Mayersberg, actor Tom Conti, and actor-composer Ryuichi Sakamoto; and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Thursday, December 21
Observations on Film Art No. 14: Girl Shy - Harold Lloyd Meets Classical Hollywood

The silent comedy might be most famous today for its one-off gags and chases, but by the twenties the form had begun to tell increasingly sophisticated feature-length stories, thanks to such pioneering figures as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art - a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at great filmmakers' use of cinematic devices and traditions - scholar David Bordwell unpacks the narrative strategies at play in Lloyd's comedy of embarrassment Girl Shy(1924), illuminating the film's implementation of such classical Hollywood devices as psychological characterization and repeated motifs.
 
Friday, December 22
Friday Night Double Feature: Chéri and Journey to Italy

The work of the French author Colette, celebrated for its evocation of affairs of the heart during the belle epoque, inspired these two tales of precarious romance. Stephen Frears's seductive period piece Chéri (2009), an adaptation of Colette's 1920 novel of the same name, tells the story of the years-long relationship between a courtesan (Michelle Pfeiffer) and her peer's decadent and impressionable son (Rupert Friend). And Robert Rossellini's modernist drama Journey to Italy (1954), loosely based on Colette's Duo (1934), observes the mounting tensions between a married British couple (Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders) during a trip to the Neapolitan countryside.
 
Tuesday, December 26
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Light Is Calling and My Winnipeg

These two films, both beautifully tactile experiments with film form, make brilliant use of found footage. In his eight-minute film Light Is Calling (2004), Bill Morrison cedes the frame to a scene from a 1926 silent film as it appears on a decomposing film reel, in the process crafting a haunting meditation on the ravages of time; in his beguiling "docu-fantasia" My Winnipeg (2007), Guy Maddin mixes archival footage with his own expressionistic black-and-white material to evoke the weird and wonderful world of his hometown.
 
Friday, December 29
Friday Night Double Feature: The Apartment and Brief Encounter

With 2018 just around the corner, take a look back at a Hollywood classic whose climax takes place on New Year's Eve, along with the movie that inspired it. David Lean reached his first great peak with Brief Encounter (1945), starring Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard as refined middle-class lovers who fail to consummate their affair in a borrowed flat when the owner unexpectedly barges in on them. Billy Wilder loved the film, but wondered-who's the guy who owns the apartment? The result: Wilder's five-time Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), which casts Jack Lemmon as the shlemiel who gives his key to his superiors for their trysts, and Shirley MacLaine as the elevator girl and executive's mistress he unexpectedly falls in love with.  
 
Friday, December 29
Weekend: Criterion Collection Edition #635

This scathing satire from Jean-Luc Godard, which celebrates its fiftieth anniversary this week, is one of cinema's great anarchic works. Determined to collect an inheritance from a dying relative, a bourgeois couple travel across the French countryside while civilization crashes and burns around them. Featuring a justly famous sequence in which the camera tracks along a seemingly endless traffic jam, and rich with historical and literary references, Weekend is a surreally funny and disturbing call for revolution, a depiction of society reverting to savagery, and - according to the credits - the end of cinema itself. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a video essay by writer and filmmaker Kent Jones; archival interviews with actors Mireille Darc and Jean Yanne, cinematographer Raoul Coutard, and assistant director Claude Miller; and more.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

December 1
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Stanley Kramer, 1963
Happy Together, Wong Kar-wai, 1997
The World of Jacques Demy, Agnes Varda, 1995
 
December 8
Godzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1954
Godzilla: King of the Monsters!, Ishiro Honda and Terry O. Morse, 1956
Godzilla Raids Again, Motoyoshi Oda, 1955
Rodan, Ishiro Honda, 1956
Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster, Ishiro Honda, 1964
Mothra vs. Godzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1964
Invasion of Astro-Monster, Ishiro Honda, 1965
The War of the Gargantuas, Ishiro Honda, 1966
Son of Godzilla, Jun Fukuda, 1967
Destroy All Monsters, Ishiro Honda, 1968
All Monsters Attack, Ishiro Honda, 1969
Godzilla vs. Megalon, Jun Fukuda, 1973
Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla, Jun Fukuda, 1974
Terror of Mechagodzilla, Ishiro Honda, 1975
 
December 12
Return to Glennascaul, Hilton Edwards, 1951
 
December 13
Phoenix, Christian Petzold, 2014

December 15
Woman in Witness Protection, Juzo Itami, 1997
A Quiet Life, Juzo Itami, 1995
Tales of a Golden Geisha, Juzo Itami, 1990
The Gentle Art of Japanese Extortion, Juzo Itami, 1992
The Funeral, Juzo Itami, 1984
Rubber Band Pistol, Juzo Itami, 1962
The Last Dance, Juzo Itami, 1995

December 20
Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, Nagisa Oshima, 1983
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For more information on FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel,
 

June 26, 2017

JULY PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

      
 
JULY PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Adventures in Moviegoing with Brad Bird, Yasujiro Ozu's Tokyo Story,
and Andrew Haigh's Weekend!
 
Saturday, July 1
Changing Faces

What does a face tell us even when it's disguised or disfigured? And what does it conceal? Guest curator Imogen Sara Smith, a critic and author of the book In Lonely Places: Film Noir Beyond the City, assembles a series of films that revolve around enigmatic faces transformed by masks, scars, and surgery, including Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face (1960) and Hiroshi Teshigahara's The Face of Another (1966).
 
Tuesday, July 4
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Premature* and Ten*

Come hitch a ride with Norwegian director Gunhild Enger and the late Iranian master Abbas Kiarostami in two films that take place entirely within moving cars. In Enger's 2012 short Premature, a pregnant Spanish woman has an agonizing encounter with her boyfriend's family upon arriving in Norway, while in the 2002 feature Ten, Kiarostami takes a boldly minimalist approach to the fissures within Iranian society, capturing ten conversations between a female driver and a series of passengers.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, July 5
Weekend*: Criterion Collection Edition #622

A casual hookup between two young men teeters on the cusp of something more in this bittersweet romance, the breakout film by British director Andrew Haigh (45 Years). Our edition includes interviews with Haigh and his cast and collaborators, footage from the film's shoot, and two of the director's early shorts.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Thursday, July 6
Grand Illusion: Criterion Collection Edition #1

"If I had only one film in the world to save, it would be Grand Illusion," said Orson Welles. No wonder it was our first DVD edition! Jean Gabin, Pierre Fresnay, and Erich von Stroheim star in Jean Renoir's masterpiece, a prison-escape film that sounds an elegiac note for the doomed nobility of Europe. We're commemorating the eightieth anniversary of this masterpiece - and the ongoing World War I centennial - with our edition, which includes video footage of Renoir discussing his experiences in combat.
 
Friday, July 7
Friday Night Double Feature: Breaker Morant and Mister Johnson

Australian director Bruce Beresford, celebrated for American hits like the Oscar-winning Driving Miss Daisy and Tender Mercies, broke through internationally with Breaker Morant (1980), the riveting drama of three Australian soldiers who are court-martialed and made scapegoats for the crimes of the British Empire during the Boer War. Ten years later, he again trained his eye on the human costs of colonialism in Mister Johnson, which adapts Joyce Cary's novel about a Nigerian villager who seeks to ingratiate himself with the British authorities in hopes of realizing his ambitions.
 
Tuesday, July 11
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Taris and Three Colors: Blue

In 1931's Taris, Jean Vigo uses every trick in his toolbox-including underwater photography, whiplash editing, and slowed and reversed motion-to capture the athletic prowess of a champion swimmer. We've paired this short with another film that makes evocative use of water: the mournful first entry in Krzysztof Kieślowski's Three Colors trilogy, in which a grief-stricken Juliette Binoche finds solace in a blue-lit swimming pool.
 
Wednesday, July 12
Senso: Criterion Collection Edition #556

Period melodrama doesn't get more operatic than this Luchino Visconti masterpiece from 1954, adapted from a novella by Italian author Camillo Boito. The film's lush Technicolor palette glistens anew in a celebrated restoration by The Film Foundation and the Cineteca di Bologna featured on our edition, which also includes The Wanton Countess, the rare English-language version of the film, and documentaries on the production and Visconti's work in opera.
 
Thursday, July 13
Tokyo Story: Criterion Collection Edition #217

Widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time, Yasujiro Ozu's 1953 family drama follows an aging couple as they pay a visit to their increasingly distracted adult children in the city, giving profound expression to the director's recurrent theme of intergenerational conflict. Supplements on our edition include I Lived, But . . ., a feature-length documentary about Ozu's life and career, as well as Talking with Ozu, a tribute to the master with reminiscences by filmmakers such as Lindsay Anderson, Hou Hsiao-hsien, and Wim Wenders.
 
Friday, July 14
Friday Night Double Feature: The Earrings of Madame de . . . and Elena and Her Men

Journey back to the belle epoque with two films that revolve around dazzling women in high society, both by master filmmakers: Max Ophuls's 1953 The Earrings of Madame de . . ., a romantic tragedy swept along by the director's famously fluid camera work, stars Danielle Darrieux as a general's wife who falls in love with a baron, while Jean Renoir's 1956 Elena and Her Men, a freewheeling farce shot in lavish Technicolor, stars Ingrid Bergman as a Polish princess whose allure ultimately steadies the French government.

Monday, July 17
Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff*

Jack Cardiff, who in 2001 became the first honorary Oscar recipient to win primarily for his work as a cinematographer, gets a close-up of his own in this 2010 documentary by Craig McCall. The film surveys a career that included collaborations with King Vidor, Alfred Hitchcock, and, most famously, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. We're showcasing two of the most stunningly vibrant Technicolor films he made with the Archers: the gripping convent drama Black Narcissus (1947) and the bewitching ballet fantasia The Red Shoes(1948).
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Tuesday, July 18
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Asparagus* and Eraserhead

Reuniting two movies that made a mark playing back-to-back on the midnight-movie circuit in the late seventies, this week's Short + Feature pairs off David Lynch's unnerving black-and-white family nightmare Eraserhead with Suzan Pitt's colorful animated short Asparagus, a psychosexual phantasmagoria that, like Lynch's film, goes all in on surrealist imagery.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, July 19
Cameraperson*: Criterion Collection Edition #853

Deftly weaving together outtake footage she shot while on assignment for other films, veteran documentary cinematographer Kirsten Johnson's lauded directorial debut takes viewers all over the world, from a hospital in Nigeria to a farm in Bosnia to a boxing match in Brooklyn, as it reflects on the nature of nonfiction filmmaking and a life spent on the road. Our complete edition features a program on the editing of the film, interviews with Johnson and her collaborators, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Thursday, July 20
The Thin Blue Line: Criterion Collection Edition #753

A watershed work in the history of the documentary form, and a stylistically influential film featuring staged reenactments and a swirling score by Philip Glass, Errol Morris's 1988 true-crime masterpiece The Thin Blue Line closely examines the case of a man on death row for the murder of a police officer - a crime he may not have committed. New interviews with Morris and The Act of Killing director Joshua Oppenheimer are among the supplements on our director-approved edition.
 
Friday, July 21
Friday Night Double Feature: The Rocking Horse Winner* and Oliver Twist

The young British actor John Howard Davies headlines two classic literary adaptations about the fickle fortunes of boyhood: Anthony Pelissier's 1949 The Rocking Horse Winner, a little-known gem based on a short story by D. H. Lawrence, tells the tale of a child who discovers a magical talent for predicting the outcomes of horse races; David Lean's 1948 masterpiece Oliver Twist, based on the Dickens novel, tags along with the titular orphan as he lands in a den of thieves in the notorious underworld of nineteenth-century London.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Saturday, July 22
Split Screen Season 6

Two decades after it premiered on IFC, the pioneering television series Split Screen has a streaming home on the Channel, with batches of episodes from the show's four-year run going up every month. A priceless time capsule of independent American cinema at the turn of the millennium, the series features producer and host John Pierson guiding viewers across the country for an irreverent look at filmmaking communities and movie-loving culture. This month's newly available installments include appearances by Billy Wilder, George Kuchar, Guy Maddin, and Jonas Mekas.
 
Monday, July 24
Adventures in Moviegoing with Brad Bird and Joe Morgenstern

The director of Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol and some of the most acclaimed animated films of the past few decades (Ratatouille, The Incredibles, The Iron Giant), Brad Bird speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Joe Morgenstern about his journey through cinema. Alongside the interview is a selection of films that have had an impact on Bird's life, including The Red Shoes (1948), Yojimbo (1961), and Stranger Than Paradise (1984). This program marks the eighth installment of Adventures in Moviegoing, a Channel-exclusive series in which artists from a variety of backgrounds discuss their formative cinematic experiences. Previous contributors include Jhumpa Lahiri, Jonathan Lethem, Mary Karr, Roger Corman, and Bill Hader.
 
Tuesday, July 25
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Kitty* and Fat Girl

Actor Chloë Sevigny made her directorial debut with Kitty, a luminous adaptation of a 1980 Paul Bowles short story in which a young girl finds herself transformed into a cat. Sevigny's film, which had its premiere at Cannes, serves as a prelude to a provocative feature that the director has selected herself: Catherine Breillat's 2001 Fat Girl, a shocking portrait of adolescent sexuality and strained sisterhood.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, July 26
The Graduate: Criterion Collection Edition #800

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of Mike Nichols's The Graduate, one of the most influential American films of the 1960s. In this bitingly funny tale of postcollegiate existential confusion, a young Dustin Hoffman stars as Benjamin Braddock, a recent graduate who has an affair with an older, married friend of the family (Anne Bancroft). Our edition features an audio commentary with Nichols and Steven Soderbergh, screen tests, a program on Harold Michelson's innovative storyboards, and interviews with Hoffman, screenwriter Buck Henry, and Paul Simon, whose songs form the centerpiece of the film's iconic soundtrack.
 
Thursday, July 27
Observations on Film Art No. 9: Chaplin's Comedy of Murders

Our Channel-exclusive series Observations on Film Art offers thought-provoking doses of film school for movie lovers, delivered by professors David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, and Jeff Smith, the authors of the canonical textbook Film Art: An Introduction. This month's episode features Bordwell examining how Charlie Chaplin jettisoned his iconic tramp persona to portray a cold-blooded serial killer in the 1947 satire Monsieur Verdoux. Previous subjects in this series include offscreen sound in Claude Chabrol's La cérémonie, camera movement in Krzysztof Kieślowski's Three Colors: Red, music in Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent, editing in Akira Kurosawa's Sanshiro Sugata, and landscapes in the work of Abbas Kiarostami.   
 
Friday, July 28
Friday Night Double Feature: La tête d'un homme and Stray Dog

Go on the chase with some of cinema's most charismatic detectives in this pair of thrillers inspired by the writing of Georges Simenon. In Julien Duvivier's 1933 La tête d'un homme, Harry Baur stars as the author's most iconic creation, Inspector Maigret, who spends the film investigating an American woman's murder in Paris. Toshiro Mifune's rookie homicide detective scours a sweltering Tokyo for his stolen gun, with the help of a seasoned detective (Takashi Shimura), in Akira Kurosawa's 1949 psychologically penetrating drama Stray Dog
 
---

Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

July 1
A Woman's Face, George Cukor, 1941
The Face Behind the Mask, Robert Florey, 1941
 
July 4
Premature, Gunhild Enger, 2012
Ten, Abbas Kiarostami, 2002
 
July 5
Weekend, Andrew Haigh, 2011
 
July 7
Young and Innocent, Alfred Hitchcock, 1937
 
July 14
What Did the Lady Forget?, Yasujiro Ozu, 1937
Ornamental Hairpin, Hiroshi Shimizu, 1941
Princess Yang Kwei-fei, Kenji Mizoguchi, 1955
Samurai Saga, Hiroshi Inagaki, 1959
The Third Shadow Warrior, Umetsugu Inoue, 1963
Sincere Heart, Masaki Kobayashi, 1953
 
July 17
Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff, Craig McCall, 2010
 
July 18
Asparagus, Suzan Pitt, 1979
 
July 19
Cameraperson, Kirsten Johnson, 2016
 
July 21
Fallen Angels, Wong Kar-wai, 1995
Chinese Odyssey 2002, Jeffrey Lau, 2002
Miao Miao, Cheng Hsiao-tse, 2008
The Eagle Shooting Heroes, Jeffrey Lau, 1993
The Rocking Horse Winner, Anthony Pelissier, 1949
 
July 25
Kitty, Chloë Sevigny, 2016
 
July 28
And the Ship Sails On, Federico Fellini, 1983
Il bidone, Federico Fellini, 1955
Le petit soldat, Jean-Luc Godard, 1963
 
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE


ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. Other recent additions to the programming include MEET THE FILMMAKER: ATHINA RACHEL TSANGARI and ADVENTURES IN MOVIEGOING WITH BILL HADER.


ABOUT FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck is a new subscription on-demand service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary and classic art house, indie, foreign and cult films. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, FilmStruck will be the new exclusive streaming home for the critically acclaimed and award-winning Criterion Collection, including the Criterion Channel, a new premium service programmed and curated by the Criterion team.  FilmStruck is Turner's first domestic direct-to-consumer offering launched in November 2016.


ABOUT THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium-from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to FilmStruck, the streaming service developed in collaboration with Turner Classic Movies - Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer's appreciation of the art of film.
 
 
 
For more information on FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel,
 

November 05, 2016

FILMSTRUCK STREAMING WITH COLE SMITHEY DEBUTS ON FORBES NOV. 10, 2016

FILMSTRUCK STREAMING

FilmStruck is a brand new streaming service collaboration between Turner Classic Movies, The Criterion Collection, and Kino Lorber. FilmStruck represents the first time in history that such a broad spectrum of classic films has been so readily available for film-lovers to consume.

On Thursday, November 10, 2016 FILMSTRUCK STREAMING WITH COLE SMITHEY will premiere on Forbes. The new program joins Cole Smithey's existing Forbes [weekly] video series NETFLIX NOW!. The FilmStruck and Netflix programs will switch off each week.

I can't believe FilmStruck is here. What a great streaming service. Film-lovers go straight to heaven.  

November 01, 2016

FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck has launched. This streaming collaboration between Kino Lorber, Criterion, and Turner Classic Movies is every film-lovers dream. This is going to be HUGE I tell ya!

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SMART NEW MEDIA® Custom Videos

COLE SMITHEY’S MOVIE WEEK

COLE SMITHEY’S CLASSIC CINEMA

Throwback Thursday


Podcast Series