4 posts categorized "Food and Drink"

March 03, 2012

JIRO DREAMS OF SUSHI



Jiro-dreams-of-sushi-3As you might imagine from the documentary’s title, “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” is a character study/biography of a master sushi chef named Jiro.

The 85-year-old Jiro Ono’s 10-seat restaurant — located in the Tokyo subway system—has received dining’s highest ranking of three Michelin stars. Reservations are booked a month in advance. A true master of his craft, Jiro has taught his two sons to follow in his footsteps. Jiro’s oldest son Yoshikazu, 50, works directly under his father, preparing the most amazing sushi in the world.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi | Reading is Delicious

Director David Gelb provides a crash-course in the stratified world of Tokyo fish markets from which Yoshikazu chooses the very best cuts of fish. The master chef lives by a simple set of rules that include things such as maintaining cleanliness and taking his job seriously. Here is a man attempting to live as modestly as possible in the service of the work he loves doing.

The Masters Review | How “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” Teaches us to be Great  Writers

There’s nothing flashy about David Gelb’s serviceable rendering of a man who has achieved an unrivaled mastery of a cuisine he helped invent. You too might come away from the movie craving Jiro Ono’s sushi, whether or not you like raw fish.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is a Delectable Treat | WIRED

Rated PG. 81 mins.

4 Stars

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August 17, 2011

TOAST

COLE SMITHEY

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Get cool rewards when you click on the button to pledge your support through Patreon. Thanks a lot pal! Your kind generosity keeps the reviews coming!

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Colesmithey.comLacking in purpose and logic "Toast" is an upside-down biopic from start to finish. British food writer Nigel Slater's memoir "Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger" provides the unbalanced recipe for television director SJ Clarkson to turn into a mumbling coming-of-age narrative.

Nine-year-old Nigel (Oscar Kennedy) grows up in England's West Midlands during the '60s with a pair of misfit parents who would make most kids run away from home. Nigel's asthmatic Mum (Victoria Hamilton) can't boil water; she hates vegetables. Dad (Ken Stott) treats Nigel with a disdain typically reserved for tax collectors. He occasionally gets violent. Nigel loves food, or at least the idea of food. In bed at night he pours over gourmet magazines as if they were girlie mags.

ColeSmithey.com

Just when Mum is coming around to encouraging Nigel's budding kitchen efforts she shuffles off her mortal coil, allowing Dad to hire Mrs. Potter (Helena Bonham Carter), a low class maid with a knack for whipping up culinary masterpieces. Given Nigel's passion for learning to cook, you might imagine he would befriend the housekeeper his father is destined to marry. Mrs. Potter could certainly teach the kitchen neophyte a thing or three. Instead, Nigel tries endlessly to one-up Mrs. Potter by making dishes to please his father's nonexistent palate for anything that doesn't come out of a can.

Toast,' About the Food Writer Nigel Slater - Review - The New York Times

Freddie Highmore takes over as the teenaged Nigel whose gay tendencies are kept at a back-burner simmer. When the moment comes that he makes his move on another boy, it practically comes out of left field. As a movie about sexual discovery, the toaster never gets plugged in. Highmore's performance leaves much to be desired. He acts as if he's doing punishment service for his agent.

MOVIE REVIEW: 'Toast' a warm coming-of-age tale - The San Diego  Union-Tribune

The film's simultaneously best and worst element is Helena Bonham Carter. Carter's Mrs. Potter is the most interesting and likable character in the whole film. But the audience is pitted against her by Nigel's illogical hatred of the one person who could and would help him in his quest to become a skilled chef. Most ironic is that Nigel Slater didn't even grow up to become a chef. Instead he became an author and broadcaster. No inkling of that trajectory is explained in a biopic that rings false on every note.

Toast (film) - Alchetron, The Free Social Encyclopedia

Not Rated. 91 mins.

1 Star

Cozy Cole

Cole Smithey on Patreon

July 28, 2011

EL BULLI: COOKING IN PROGRESS

COLE SMITHEY

Groupthink doesn't live here, critical thought does.

This ad-free website is dedicated to Agnès Varda and to Luis Buñuel.

Get cool rewards when you click on the button to pledge your support through Patreon. Thanks a lot pal! Your kind generosity keeps the reviews coming!

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Colesmithey.comIn case your culinary experiences have been limited by, say, the collapse of global capitalism, "El Bulli" is widely considered the most famous as well as the best restaurant in the world. It holds the Michelin Guide's highest rating of three stars. In recent years the avant garde eatery has only been open six months out of each year in order to allow its visionary Catalan chef Ferran Adrià time to confer with his team of molecular gastronomists to design the next season's menu. Ironically and perhaps intentionally, at the time of the film's release the restaurant will close for at least two years before Ferran Adrià opens it again — with a totally new menu.

'El Bulli: Cooking in Progress' - Review - The New York Times

Gereon Wetzel's documentary study of Adrià's studious process of creation is generally a fly-on-the-wall affair that may seem dry because it doesn't give into the television-styled editorial crutches you might expect. Here the subjects are observed rather than interviewed. Adrià's disciplined assistant chefs work with scalpels rather than knives as they discuss visual elements of dishes disguised to look like a completely different food.

El Bulli wines to go under the hammer in Hong Kong and New York

A trip to the local market may involve purchasing "five grapes." The clinical atmosphere in the lab is intense. No music plays in the background. Adrià's top chefs Oriol Castro and Eduard Xatruch periodically crack smiles but no one is telling any jokes. Watching Adrià's poker face as he tastes concoctions most people can only dream about is part of the fun. Under his serious exterior Adrià has a wild imagination and a sly sense of humor.

Movie Review: "El Bulli: Cooking In Progress" ⋆ BYT // Brightest Young  Things

Half the film is spent in the food lab, and half on the setup and execution of the actual restaurant in the province of Girona, overlooking a picturesque seaside cove. Ingredients such as small chunks of ice are discussed while foods are freeze-dried, puréed, and vacuumized in an ongoing effort at deconstruction in order to make the diner "feel" as well as taste the food. The restaurant serves 35 courses to 55 diners each night over a period of four hours; "the more bewilderment the better." Water that tastes like a pine tree, rabbit brains, paper-thin tuna, and ravioli where the casing vanishes are dishes to be explored. "El Bulli: Cooking in Progress" is a fascinating cinematic window into an elite culinary world where anything is possible.

 Not Rated. 108 mins.

3 Stars

Cozy Cole

Cole Smithey on Patreon

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