7 posts categorized "Rock 'n' Roll"

February 14, 2013

DON'T STOP BELIEVIN': EVERYMAN'S JOURNEY

Don't Stop Believin'Whether or not you are a fan of Journey’s music, Ramona S. Diaz’s uplifting documentary about Arnel Pineda’s rise from an impoverished Philippine youth to becoming the lead singer for a hugely successful rock band, will charm you. Discovered by Journey’s guitarist Neal Schon from thousands of YouTube videos, Arnel Pineda has the voice of an angel or a lion — depending on how you perceive his vocal power.

Short in stature but overflowing with exuberant youthful energy, Pineda wins over fans and detractors alike. The documentary isn’t the best-edited, but the filmmaker can hardly make a wrong move with the camera-friendly Arnel Pineda as her subject. Candid, funny, and grounded to his relationship with his wife, Pineda comes across a worthy recipient for all that fame and fortune has to offer. Having already conquered the lure of alcohol and drugs, Pineda's attention to his health allows him to perform with a staggering amount of energy.

Colesmithey.com

Even Iggy Pop never had anything on this guy. The filmmaker does manage to ask the correct question of Journey’s manager, who reveals that Arnel is indeed a fully vested member of the five-man band; he receives the same amount of money as his adoring band mates. It’s fascinating to see how a young singer from Manila can transform a classic rock band of aging white guys into a super-band. In the case of Journey especially, Arnel Pineda proves the postulate that, “It’s the singer, not the song.”

Colesmithey.com

Not Rated. 105 mins.

3 Stars

Groupthink doesn't live here, critical thought does.

This website is dedicated to Agnès Varda and to Luis Buñuel.

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May 07, 2012

TONIGHT YOUR'E MINE

Colesmithey.comAs far as movies about nothing go, David Mackenzie’s synth-rock fantasy love story scrapes the bottom of the barrel. Teen idol characters and their booze-filled fans gather at Scotland’s outdoor music festival “T in the Park” to mix bodily fluids with tobacco, pot, rain, and grime.

Luke Treadway’s Adam is the egotistical singer for a crummy rock duo band with a proclivity for rehearsing acoustic versions of their songs in the back of ultra-compact cars. The disposable pop musician meets his polar opposite/equal in rival bandleader Morello (Natalia Tena) when the two find themselves handcuffed together by an asinine festival prankster who promptly disappears with the key. Unskilled in the art of using a paperclip to unlock a handcuff, the pair spends the movie bickering with their respective partners when they aren’t drawn into performing onstage together against their will.

Image result for TONIGHT YOUR'E MINE movie

Short on substance, and barely approaching any degree of musical interest, “Tonight You’re Mine” is a half-baked piece of cinematic fluff for barely pubescent female audiences who ostensibly don’t know any better. What a snooze.

Image result for TONIGHT YOUR'E MINE movie

Rated R. 80 mins.

1 Star

Groupthink doesn't live here, critical thought does.

This website is dedicated to Agnès Varda and to Luis Buñuel.

Get cool rewards when you click on the button to pledge your support through Patreon.

Cole Smithey on Patreon

April 08, 2012

HIT SO HARD: THE LIFE AND NEAR DEATH STORY OF PATTY SCHEMEL

Hit So HardThe rough-and-tumble story of “Hole” drummer Patty Schemel’s rapid rise to rock-star fame, and equally rapid decline due to addiction, makes for an affecting documentary.

Inculcated in the crucible of Kurt Cobain’s and Courtney Love’s magical sphere of musical creativity, red-haired lesbian drummer Patty Schemel had the chops to propel Love’s grunge band Hole through multiple recordings and huge stadium rock shows all over the world. Patty’s addictive personality — informed by her parents’ alcoholism — was bound to fall prey to the mass quantities of booze and drugs that came with the territory. The death of Kurt Cobain, and Hole’s bass player Kristen Pfaff were dark omens.

Hit So Hard – The Life and Near Death of Patty Schemel – Alex Donald's  Multiverse

Director/editor P. David Ebersole packs this vibrant film with a treasure trove of archive live performance footage, home movies, and personal photographs to document stages of Patty’s time with Hole. Rare home movie footage of Kurt Cobain goes a long way toward establishing the family-like atmosphere in Carnation, Washington, where Patty lived with the young couple and their baby. Ebersole shuffles together interview sessions with Patty that were separated by several years. The filmmaker plays a neat editorial trick when he reveals the dates the sessions were recorded as a late-film reveal.

Hit So Hard' Follows Patty Schemel, Drummer for Hole - The New York Times

The documentary gets into minor trouble with text graphics of messages and quotes that periodically come across various parts of the screen in various sizes and fonts. The effect is distracting rather than informing. Nonetheless, “Hit So hard” is a candid and heartfelt look at one woman’s struggles in the music business. Patty Schemel definitely hits hard.

Not Rated. 101 mins.

3 Stars

Groupthink doesn't live here, critical thought does.

This website is dedicated to Agnès Varda and to Luis Buñuel.

Get cool rewards when you click on the button to pledge your support through Patreon.

Cole Smithey on Patreon

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