9 posts categorized "Streaming"

September 03, 2018

SEPTEMBER PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

 
SEPTEMBER PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Olivier Assayas's Clouds of Sils Maria, 
Adventures in Moviegoing with Paul Feig, and Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man!
 
Saturday, September 1
Cul-de-sac*: Edition #577

This slyly absurd tale of paranoia stars Donald Pleasence and Françoise Dorléac as a withdrawn couple whose isolated house is invaded by a rude, burly American gangster on the run, played by Lionel Stander. The three engage in role-playing games of sexual and emotional humiliation in one of Roman Polanski's most evocative and claustrophobic tales of modern chaos. Supplemental features: a 2003 documentary about the making of the film and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Monday, September 3
The Holy Mountain:  
Now playing in Art-House America: Texas Theatre, Dallas, Texas

The Channel-exclusive series Art-House America recently visited the Texas Theatre, a Dallas venue that became infamous as the site where Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested and now hosts a variety of imaginative repertory screening events. Alongside our documentary profile of the theater, the staff is hosting an ongoing series in which they pick films that reflect their approach to programming. The latest addition is Alejandro Jodorowsky's perennial midnight-movie favorite, a mind-bending satire of religion, colonialism, and consumerism that stars the Chilean director as a mysterious figure called "The Alchemist" who leads a group of initiates on a bizarre esoteric quest. A feast of hallucinatory tableaux and outrageous imagery, The Holy Mountain is one of the most indelible cult classics of its era, and shares its audacious formal approach with the previous entry in the Texas Theatre's series, Chris Marker's entrancing sci-fi fable La Jetée.
 
Tuesday, September 4
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Cage* and Kes
Boys befriend birds in this week's short and feature pairing. The tensions within a Romanian nuclear family strapped for cash come to a boil in Adrian Sitaru's 2010 short The Cage when the young son adopts an ailing pigeon, to the chagrin of his exasperated father (Graduation's Adrian Titieni) and long-suffering mother. Then, Ken Loach's 1970 Kes, a benchmark of social realism, explores the inner life of a miner's son growing up in Northern England through his bond with a wild kestrel.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, September 5
Dead Man*: Edition #919

With Dead Man, his first period piece, Jim Jarmusch imagined the nineteenth-century American West as an existential wasteland, delivering a surreal reckoning with the ravages of industrialization, the country's legacy of violence and prejudice, and the natural cycle of life and death. Accountant William Blake (Johnny Depp) has hardly arrived in the godforsaken outpost of Machine before he's caught in the middle of a fatal lovers' quarrel. Wounded and on the lam, Blake falls under the watch of the outcast Nobody (Gary Farmer), who guides his companion on a spiritual journey, teaching him to dispense poetic justice along the way. Featuring austerely beautiful black-and-white photography by Robby Müller and a live-wire score by Neil Young, Dead Man is a profound and unique revision of the western genre. Supplemental features: a Q&A in which Jarmusch responds to questions sent in by fans, rarely seen footage of Neil Young composing and performing the film's score, an interview with actor Gary Farmer, deleted scenes, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Thursday, September 6
Adventures in Moviegoing with Paul Feig
In the latest episode of the Channel-exclusive guest-programmer series Adventures in Moviegoing, the director of Bridesmaids and Ghostbusters and creator of Freaks and Geeks sits down with author Sam Wasson to talk about some of his favorite films and the experiences that have shaped his approach to comedy. From childhood viewings of PlayTime and What's Up, Doc? to later discoveries like The Conversation, Feig draws lessons about storytelling and style from the films that have expanded his conception of what a movie can be.
 
Friday, September 7
Friday Night Double Feature: Barry Lyndon and Tom Jones
Stanley Kubrick and Tony Richardson take radically different routes through the past in these picaresque period films about rakish social climbers. Kubrick's magisterial 1975 adaptation of William Makepeace Thackeray's The Luck of Barry Lyndon adopts a tone of Olympian irony toward its ambitious hero (Ryan O'Neal) and mounts a lavish recreation of the eighteenth-century aristocracy he schemes his way into. Earthier, zippier, and bawdier, Richardson's 1963 Oscar winner Tom Jones injects an irreverent charm into Henry Fielding's classic portrait of an amorous foundling, played by Albert Finney in a star-making performance.
Tuesday, September 11
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Deer Boy* and Antichrist
These darkly atmospheric fairy tales stray into the forest to explore some of the primal anxieties of parents and children. Polish filmmaker Katarzyna Gondek's hauntingly atmospheric Deer Boy (2017) tells the tale of a boy born with antlers, a misfortune that causes his mother and father feelings of shame, and the child to question his true nature-especially when he grows old enough to learn the family trade: deer hunting. Danish provocateur Lars von Trier's psychodrama Antichrist (2009) trails a therapist (Willem Dafoe) and his wife (Charlotte Gainsbourg) into the woods, where they retreat after the accidental death of their infant son. But no respite is to be found, as they encounter all manner of gruesome terrors courtesy of Mother Nature- and, eventually, each other.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, September 12
Heaven Can Wait: Edition #291

Deceased playboy Henry Van Cleve (Don Ameche) presents himself to the outer offices of Hades, where he asks a bemused Satan for permission to enter through the gates of hell. Though the devil doubts that Henry's sins qualify him for eternal damnation, Henry proceeds to recount a lifetime of wooing and pursuing women, his long, happy marriage to Martha (Gene Tierney) notwithstanding. Ernst Lubitsch's Heaven Can Wait, nominated for Academy Awards for best picture and director, is an enduring classic that showcases the filmmaker's trademark blend of wit, urbanity, and grace. Supplemental features: a conversation from 2005 between film critics Molly Haskell and Andrew Sarris, an episode from 1982 of Creativity with Bill Moyers exploring screenwriter Samson Raphaelson's life and career, home recordings of director Ernst Lubitsch playing the piano, and more.
 
Friday, September 14
Friday Night Double Feature: Wife vs. Secretary and The Hudsucker Proxy

The corporate world of midcentury Manhattan invites intrigue and suspicion in these two spins on the screwball. In Clarence Brown's sophisticated romance Wife vs. Secretary (1936), high-rolling Manhattanites Van (Clark Gable) and Linda Stanhope (Myrna Loy) seem to be living the life-until Linda begins to (wrongly) suspect her magazine-publisher husband of having an affair with his secretary (Jean Harlow). Taking its cues from golden-age comedies like Brown's, the Coen brothers' brilliantly stylized corporate satire The Hudsucker Proxy (1994) sets into motion a dizzying plot involving a scheming executive (Paul Newman), the dimwit (Tim Robbins) he installs as the president of his company, and the crusading journalist (Jennifer Jason Leigh) who poses as the new boss's secretary in an effort to figure out why.
Tuesday, September 18
Tuesday's Short + Feature: When We Lived in Miami* and Key Largo

Drama erupts against darkening skies in the Sunshine State. In Amy Seimetz's hypnotic 2012 short When We Lived in Miami, filmed in the city during Hurricane Isaac, a young mother (Seimetz) struggles to raise her daughter after her husband's departure, with the wind and rain beginning to lash the coast. Using hurricane season as a backdrop for a harder-boiled story, John Huston's 1948 noir Key Largo stars Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall (together on-screen for the fourth and final time) as occupants of a run-down Florida Keys. As they hunker down ahead of an approaching storm, they end up being held hostage by an infamous gangster (Edward G. Robinson).
Wednesday, September 19
Clouds of Sils Maria*: Edition #822

This multilayered, immensely entertaining drama from the great contemporary French director Olivier Assayas is a singular look at the intersection of high art and popular culture. The always extraordinary Juliette Binoche is stirring as Maria, a stage and screen icon who is being courted to star in a new production of the play that made her famous-only this time she must assume the role of the older woman. Kristen Stewart matches her punch for punch as her beleaguered assistant, called upon to provide support both professional and emotional for her mercurial boss. And Chloë Grace Moretz is Maria's callow new castmate, a starlet waiting in the wings. An amorphous, soul-searching tale, filled with ethereal images of its Swiss Alps setting, Clouds of Sils Maria brilliantly dramatizes one woman's reckoning with herself and the world. Supplemental features: an interview with Assayas, a program featuring Binoche and Stewart on their roles in the film, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Friday, September 21
Friday Night Double FeatureThe Man with the Golden Arm and Pale Flower
The siren call of addiction beckons in these two noirish films with jazz-infused scores. Otto Preminger's 1955 The Man with the Golden Arm, which was controversial at the time of its release for its forthright depiction of heroin addiction, takes a hard look at the life of an aspiring Chicago drummer (Frank Sinatra) who struggles to stay clean after his release from prison. Elmer Bernstein's music, which was nominated for an Oscar (along with Sinatra), gives the movie with its distinctive nervous rhythm. A breakthrough for Japanese New Wave director Masahiro Shinoda, 1964's seductive and impeccably crafted Pale Flower travels deep into Tokyo's underworld, tracking a yakuza as he falls under the sway of a beautiful gambling addict. The percussive score by avant-garde composer Toru Takemitsu, a frequent collaborator of Shinoda's, serves to heighten the seductive yet dangerous atmosphere.
 
Monday, September 24
Observations on Film Art #23: Mutations of Memory-Editing in Hiroshima mon amour
With his 1959 debut feature, Hiroshima mon amour, French editor-turned-director Alain Resnais forever altered the way memory was captured on-screen. Working from a screenplay by Marguerite Duras, Resnais tells the story of a French actress and a Japanese architect who engage in a brief, intense affair against the backdrop of postwar Hiroshima. Through an innovative structure that weaves together past and present, the film navigates the currents of the couple's personal pain and public anguish. For the latest episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that offers viewers a monthly ten-minute dose of film school, Professor Jeff Smith examines the ways in which Resnais's puzzle-like masterpiece redefined cinematic language in its use of groundbreaking editing techniques.
Tuesday, September 25
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Voice Thief* and The Dance of Reality

Two twisted, carnivalesque visions, sprung from the wild minds of cult filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky and his son Adan. Starring Asia Argento, Adan's 2013 short film The Voice Thief tells the story of an opera singer who loses her voice, prompting her husband to go on a journey into the underworld to recover it. That same year, Alejandro made his semi-autobiographical The Dance of Reality, a fantastical rendering of his childhood growing up in politically turbulent Chile, featuring music composed by Adan.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, September 26
McCabe & Mrs. Miller: Edition #827

This unorthodox dream western by Robert Altman may be the most radically beautiful film to come out of the New American Cinema. It stars Warren Beatty and Julie Christie as two newcomers to the raw Pacific Northwest mining town of Presbyterian Church, who join forces to provide the miners with a superior kind of whorehouse experience. The appearance of representatives of a powerful mining company with interests of its own, however, threatens to be the undoing of their plans. With its fascinating flawed characters, evocative cinematography by the great Vilmos Zsigmond, innovative overlapping dialogue, and haunting use of Leonard Cohen songs, McCabe & Mrs. Miller brilliantly deglamorized and revitalized the most American of genres. Supplemental features: an audio commentary featuring Altman and producer David Foster, a making-of documentary, a conversation about the film and Altman's career between film historians Cari Beauchamp and Rick Jewell, a featurette from the film's 1970 production, and more.
 
Friday, September 28
Friday Night Double Feature: Fox and His Friends and Multiple Maniacs

Two of cinema's greatest queer provocateurs take center stage in this double bill, each with his signature troupe of outsider performers. In Fox and His Friends, Rainer Werner Fassbinder's controversial 1975 depiction of gay life in West Germany, the director stars as a working-class innocent who lets himself be taken advantage of by his bourgeois new boyfriend and his circle of materialistic friends. "Seeing a Fassbinder retrospective is better than drugs, liquor and sex put together," said John Waters, whose gloriously grotesque second feature, 1970's Multiple Maniacs, shows a similar taste for no-holds-barred provocation. Overflowing with depravity, Waters' gleeful mockery of the peace-and-love ethos features the Cavalcade of Perversion, a traveling show mounted by a group of misfits whose shocking proclivities are topped only by those of their leader, played by the larger-than-life Divine.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
September 1
Cul-de-sac, Roman Polanski, 1966
Kes, Ken Loach, 1970
 
September 4
The Cage, Adrian Sitaru, 2010
 
September 5
Dead Man, Jim Jarmusch, 1995
 
September 11
Deer Boy, Katarzyna Gondek, 2017
 
September 18
When We Lived in Miami, Amy Seimetz, 2013
 
September 19
Clouds of Sils Maria, Olivier Assayas, 2014
 
September 25
The Voice Thief, Adan Jodorowsky, 2013
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.
 

July 25, 2018

AUGUST PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
AUGUST PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Sydney Pollack's Tootsie, 
Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins on The World, the Flesh and the Devil, and Sofia Coppola's Lick the Star!
 
Wednesday, August 1
Tootsie: Edition #738*

In Tootsie, Michael Dorsey lands the role of a lifetime-as did the actor playing him, Dustin Hoffman. This multilayered comedy from Sydney Pollack follows the elaborate deception of a down-on-his-luck New York actor who poses as a woman to get a soap opera gig; while "Dorothy Michaels" skyrockets to fame, Michael finds himself learning to be a better man. Given support by a stellar cast that includes Dabney Coleman, Charles Durning, Teri Garr, George Gaynes, Bill Murray, and, in a breakthrough performance, Jessica Lange, Tootsie is a funny, cutting, and poignant film from an American moment defined by shifting social and sexual identities. Supplemental features: an audio commentary featuring director Sydney Pollack, interviews with Hoffman and comedy writer Phil Rosenthal, interview with Dorothy Michaels by film critic Gene Shalit, two documentaries about the making of the film, and more.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, August 1
Barry Jenkins Presents The World, the Flesh and the Devil*

As a guest curator on the Channel-exclusive series Adventures in Moviegoing, Barry Jenkins introduces this atmospheric science fiction film from 1959. Mine inspector Ralph (Harry Belafonte) digs himself out of a caved-in coal shaft only to discover that a sudden apocalypse has wiped humanity from the face of the earth. When he meets two other survivors in New York, he discovers that prejudice and taboo have outlived the demise of civilization itself. Directed by Ranald MacDougall, and produced by Belafonte's own production company, The World, the Flesh and the Devil fuses ingenious genre filmmaking with incisive social commentary.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Thursday, August 2
Female Trouble: Edition #929
Glamour has never been more grotesque than in Female Trouble, which injects the Hollywood melodrama with anarchic decadence. Divine, director John Waters' larger-than-life muse, engulfs the screen with charisma as Dawn Davenport, the living embodiment of the film's lurid mantra, "Crime is beauty," who progresses from a teenage nightmare hell-bent on getting cha-cha heels for Christmas to a fame monster whose egomaniacal impulses land her in the electric chair. Shot in Waters' native Baltimore on 16 mm, with a cast drawn from his beloved troupe of regulars, the Dreamlanders (including Mink Stole, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, Edith Massey, and Cookie Mueller), this film­-the director's favorite of his work with Divine-comes to life through the tinsel-toned vision of production designer Vincent Peranio and costume designer/makeup artist Van Smith. An endlessly quotable fan favorite, Female Trouble offers up perverse pleasures that never fail to satisfy. Supplemental features: audio commentary featuring Waters, a conversation between Waters and critic Dennis Lim, interviews with cast and crew members, deleted scenes and alternate takes, and more.
 
Friday, August 3
Friday Night Double Feature: The Clock and Before Sunrise

Time runs out for new lovers in these exquisitely romantic films by Vincente Minelli and Richard Linklater. The Clock (1945) stars Robert Walker as a soldier on leave who meets cute with Judy Garland in Penn Station. The couple fall deeply in love on a rhapsodic tour of New York City-stunningly recreated on a studio soundstage-before the war threatens to separate them forever. In Before Sunrise (1995), an American tourist (Ethan Hawke) and French student (Julie Delpy) meet by chance on a train to Vienna and decide to spend a day together. Over the course of a rambling, charming, intimate series of conversations, they form a tender connection, made all the more poignant by the chance that they'll never see each other again.
Tuesday, August 7
Tuesday's Short and Feature: Hunger* and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
Gluttony and greed drive men to dangerous and grotesque extremes in this week's Short + Feature pairing. Peter Foldes's 1974 Cannes-award-winning short Hunger, one of the first computer-animated films ever made, follows a shape-shifting figure who sets out at the end of a workday on a monstrous eating binge and is consumed by the wages of sin. Then, John Huston's classic fable of adventure and avarice-shot on location south of the border-stars Humphrey Bogart, Tim Holt, and Walter Huston (the filmmaker's father) as Americans in Mexico whose hunt for gold drives them to paranoia, desperation, and violence.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
 
Wednesday, August 8
Being There: Edition #864
In one of his most finely tuned performances, Peter Sellers plays the pure-hearted, childlike Chance, a gardener who is forced into the wilds of Washington, D.C., when his wealthy guardian dies. Shocked to discover that the real world doesn't respond to the click of a remote, Chance stumbles into celebrity after being taken under the wing of a tycoon (Melvyn Douglas, in an Oscar-winning performance), who mistakes his protégé's horticultural mumblings for sagacious pronouncements on life and politics, and whose wife (Shirley MacLaine) targets Chance as the object of her desire. Adapted from a novel by Jerzy Kosinski, this satire, both deeply melancholy and hilarious, is the culmination of Hal Ashby's remarkable string of films in the 1970s, and a carefully modulated examination of the ideals, anxieties, and media-fueled delusions that shaped American culture during that decade. Supplemental features: a documentary on the making of the film, excerpts from a 1980 American Film Institute seminar with director Hal Ashby, appearances from 1980 by actor Peter Sellers on The Don Lane Show, and more.
Friday, August 10
Friday Night Double Feature: An Actor's Revenge and Tootsie
The duplicitous world of acting takes center stage in these two tales of gender-bending thespians. Kon Ichikawa's kabuki-inspired melodrama An Actor's Revenge (1963) features a chameleonic performance by Kazuo Hasegawa, who plays a female impersonator intent on avenging the deaths of his parents. And in Sydney Pollack's Tootsie (1982), struggling actor Michael (Dustin Hoffman) lands the role of a lifetime by posing as a woman for a soap-opera gig-a part that brings him unexpected fame, as well as a crash course in the trials and tribulations faced by women in 1980s America.
Tuesday, August 14
Tuesday's Short and Feature: Lick the Star* and Smithereens

Trailblazing female filmmakers deliver two lo-fi portraits of young women living dangerously, both fueled by killer soundtracks. Just before breaking through with The Virgin Suicides, Sofia Coppola made her first foray into directing with Lick the Star (1998), a black-and-white 16 mm short about the viciousness of high school cliques that establishes the filmmaker's ongoing fascination with the interior lives of women. With Smithereens (1982)-the first American independent film to compete for the Palme d'Or-Susan Seidelman captures the grit and glam of eighties downtown New York through the story of a fame-seeking punk heroine.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, August 15
Barry Lyndon: Edition #897

Stanley Kubrick bent the conventions of the historical drama to his own will in this dazzling vision of a pitiless aristocracy, adapted from a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray. In picaresque detail, Barry Lyndon chronicles the adventures of an incorrigible trickster (Ryan O'Neal) whose opportunism takes him from an Irish farm to the battlefields of the Seven Years' War and the parlors of high society. For the most sumptuously crafted film of his career, Kubrick recreated the decadent surfaces and intricate social codes of the period, evoking the light and texture of eighteenth-century painting with the help of pioneering cinematographic techniques and lavish costume and production design, all of which earned Academy Awards. The result is a masterpiece-a sardonic, devastating portrait of a vanishing world whose opulence conceals the moral vacancy at its heart. Supplemental features: a documentary featuring cast and crew interviews as well as audio excerpts from a 1976 interview with director Stanley Kubrick, a program about the film's groundbreaking visuals, an interview with critic Michel Ciment, and more.
Thursday, August 16
Masterclass: Damien Chazelle on Chronicle of a Summer

The last few years have been a wild ride for director Damien Chazelle. His semi-autobiographical breakthrough, Whiplash, received three Academy Awards, and his contemporary spin on the golden-age musical, La La Land, made him the youngest person to ever win an Oscar. Last winter, the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Cinematheque invited Chazelle to present a rare 35 mm print of La La Land, and also hosted a series that included a selection of his personal favorite films. A passionate cinephile who developed his inventive approach to style and form while studying documentary filmmaking at Harvard, Chazelle joined professor Kelley Conway for a discussion about Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin's 1961 cinéma verité masterwork Chronicle of a Summer, in which he delved into the evolution of documentary cinema in the sixties and the ways in which nonfiction film has influenced his work with actors. In this program, we present the full wide-ranging talk alongside our edition of Chronicle of a Summer.
Friday, August 17
Friday Night Double Feature: Lolita and The Night of the Iguana

Sue Lyon delivers provocative performances in these two literary adaptations. With her heart-shaped glasses and coquettish charm, the actress, under the direction of Stanley Kubrick, made a cinematic icon out of the title character of Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, a fourteen-year-old girl entangled in a forbidden relationship with a middle-aged professor (James Mason). In John Huston's take on Tennessee Williams's play The Night of the Iguana, Lyon once again embodies a daring nymphet, this time attempting to seduce an unstable priest played by Richard Burton.
 
Tuesday, August 21
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Moonshiners* and A Private Function*

Oink, oink! This porcine pair of comedies kicks off with Juho Kuosmanen's 2018 short The Moonshiners, which sets out to remake a lost 1907 movie thought to be the first feature in Finnish film history. In Kuosmanen's take, a couple embark on a journey to find the essentials for a good life: moonshine-making equipment and a pig. Then, in Malcolm Mowbray's 1984 comedy A Private Function, Maggie Smith and Michael Palin star as a couple in postwar England who steal a hog fattened up for a royal wedding celebration.
*Premiering on the Channel this month. 
Wednesday, August 22
The Philadelphia Story: Edition #901
With this furiously witty comedy of manners, Katharine Hepburn revitalized her career and cemented her status as the era's most iconic leading lady-thanks in great part to her own shrewd orchestrations. While starring in the Philip Barry stage play The Philadelphia Story, Hepburn acquired the screen rights, handpicking her friend George Cukor to direct. The intoxicating screenplay by Donald Ogden Stewart pits the formidable Philadelphia socialite Tracy Lord (Hepburn, at her most luminous) against various romantic foils, chief among them her charismatic ex-husband (Cary Grant), who disrupts her imminent marriage by paying her family estate a visit, accompanied by a tabloid reporter on assignment to cover the wedding of the year (James Stewart, in his only Academy Award-winning performance). A fast-talking screwball comedy as well as a tale of regret and reconciliation, this convergence of golden-age talent is one of the greatest American films of all time. Supplemental features: an audio commentary from 2005 featuring film scholar Jeanine Basinger, a documentary about the origin of the character and her social milieu, a piece about actor Katharine Hepburn's role in the development of the film, two full episodes of The Dick Cavett Show from 1973, and more.
 
Friday, August 24
Friday Night Double Feature: Child's Pose and White Heat

The bond between mother and son isn't always so wholesome, as these two films go to show. Portraying a corrupt society where everyone seems to have a price, Romanian filmmaker Călin Peter Netzer's award-winning drama Child's Pose (2013) follows a well-to-do woman as she races to steer her ne'er-do-well son clear of facing charges for a fatal hit-and-run. Raoul Walsh's classic noir White Heat (1949) revolves around a psychopathic criminal (James Cagney) who learned his gangster ways from-and remains overly devoted to-his ruthless mother.
 
Monday, August 27
Observations on Film Art No. 22: Dissolves in The Long Day Closes

Terence Davies's achingly beautiful The Long Day Closes (1992) adopts the perspective of a young boy growing up in 1950s Liverpool, affording an intimate glimpse of the hopes and fears of a lonely child on the cusp of adolescence. Unlike many coming-of-age films, Davies's heavily autobiographical second feature eschews a linear progression in favor of a boldly nonchronological method of storytelling. In the latest episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that every month offers viewers a ten-minute dose of film school, Professor Kristin Thompson focuses on how the film's editing holds its unorthodox narrative structure together. Davies has said that "when you see a dissolve, whether you realize it or not, you always read it as time passing, either forward or backward," and here, Thompson observes the ways in which the technique allows The Long Day Closes to mimic the fluidity and emotional texture of memory.
 
Tuesday, August 28
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Night Mayor* and Je t'aime, je t'aime

Weird science powers these films from two of cinema's most original dreamers. In Guy Maddin's Night Mayor (2009), a black-and-white short set in 1939 Winnipeg, a Bosnian-immigrant inventor learns how to use the northern lights to broadcast images across his adopted homeland of Canada. In Alain Resnais's 1968 Je t'aime, je t'aime-a major influence on a later head-trip down memory lane, Michel Gondry's 2004 film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind-a group of scientists persuade a suicidal man to take part in a mysterious time-travel experiment.
 
Wednesday, August 29
Army of Shadows: Edition #385

This masterpiece by Jean-Pierre Melville about the French Resistance went unreleased in the United States for thirty-seven years, until its triumphant theatrical debut in 2006. Atmospheric and gripping, Army of Shadows is Melville's most personal film, featuring Lino Ventura, Paul Meurisse, Jean-Pierre Cassel, and the incomparable Simone Signoret as intrepid underground fighters who must grapple with their conception of honor in their battle against Hitler's regime. Supplemental features: a short program on Melville and the film, a rare short documentary shot on the front lines during the final days of German-occupied France, and more.
 
Friday, August 31
Friday Night Double Feature: Some Like It Hot and Insignificance

Marilyn Monroe and her enduring legacy step into the spotlight in this week's double bill. One of the most iconic Hollywood films of all time, Billy Wilder's 1959 comedy Some Like It Hotfeatures Monroe as the jazz singer Sugar "Kane" Kowalczyk, whose all-female band is joined by two musicians (Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon) dressed as women in order to hide from the mob. Nicolas Roeg's characteristically idiosyncratic 1985 chamber piece Insignificance takes place in a New York City hotel room, where characters based on four larger-than-life figures of the 1950s-Albert Einstein (Michael Emil), Joe DiMaggio (Gary Busey), Joseph McCarthy (Curtis), and Monroe herself (Theresa Russell)-reflect on their lives, fame, and the era they've come to signify.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
August 1
Tootsie, Sydney Pollack, 1982
The World, the Flesh and the Devil, Ranald MacDougall, 1959
 
August 7
Hunger, Peter Foldes, 1974
 
August 14
Lick the Star, Sofia Coppola, 1998
 
August 21
The Moonshiners, Juho Kuosmanen, 2017
A Private Function, Malcolm Mowbray, 1984
 
August 28
Night Mayor, Guy Maddin, 2009
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.

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June 02, 2018

STREAMING ON AMAZON PRIME JUNE 2018

Amazon-prime-video

Here's the list of films streaming on Amazon Prime beginning June 1. The bolded titles are my personal picks. Bon appetite.

June 1

1492: Conquest Of Paradise

2 Days In The Valley

Allan Quatermain And The Lost City Of Gold

All Or Nothing: New Zealand All Blacks: Season 1

As Good As Dead

August Rush

Babylon 5: Seasons 1-5

Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans

Beer For My Horses

Beowulf

Black Widow (AKA: Before It Had a Name)

Blitz

Blood And Glory

Blue Like Jazz

Breakdown

Burnt Offerings

Cavedweller

Chinese Box

Clown At Midnight

Command Performance

Danger Zone

Day Of The Dead

Doctor Zhivago

Dog Watch

Double Identity

Double Jeopardy

Dreams And Memories Of Where The Red Fern Grows

Drop Zone

Escape From Alcatraz

Event Horizon

Flickers

Forces Of Nature

Flood

Hans Christian Andersen: My Life As A Fairytale

Hard Rain

Harley Davidson And The Marlboro Man

House Of D

I Am David

Ladies Man

Leprechaun

Leprechaun 2

Leprechaun 3

Leprechaun 4: In Space

Leprechaun 5: In The Hood

Leprechaun 6: Back 2 Tha Hood

Leprechaun: Origins

Mousehunt

Mutant Species

Nacho Libre

Nurse 3D

Panic

Rare Birds

Religulous

Rescue Me: Seasons 1-9

Revenge Of The Pink Panther

Ring Of Fire

Saturday Night Fever

Serving Sara

Space Jam

Stanley & Iris

Survivor

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber Of Fleet Street

Tamara

Tears Of The Sun

The 4th Floor

The Age Of Innocence

The Ant Bully

The Ashram

The ‘Burbs

The Care Bears Movie

The Disaster Artist

The Eye 2

The Frozen Ground

The Iceman

The Natural

The Pink Panther Strikes Again

The Running Man

The Young Karl Marx

Tilt

Universal Soldier

Vampire In Brooklyn

The Waltons: Seasons 1-9

War, Inc.

Wonder Wheel

June 3

Lady Bird

Max 2: White House Hero

Stargate

June 5

Lions For Lambs

June 8

Lost In Oz: Season 1

June 9

Braven

Precious

Simon Says

June 15

Goliath: Season 2

June 16

Nostalgia

Transformers: The Last Knight

June 18

Suits: Season 7

June 26

Shutter Island

If You Give A Mouse A Cookie: Season 1

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